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Loyola University Chicago

Asian Studies

Fall 2014 Courses

ASIA 101—Explorations in Asia Studies

MWF 1:40-2:30pm Janet Fair

This course introduces the histories and cultures of East, Southeast, and South Asia from early modern times to the present. 

 

CHIN 101—Chinese I

MWF 10:25-11:15am Hong Chen

MWF 11:30am-12:20pm Hong Chen

This is an introductory course in Modern Standard Chinese (Mandarin) for students with none or little prior experience in Chinese. This course introduces the four basic communicative skills in Chinese: listening, speaking, reading and writing, and emphasizes on conversation.

Outcome: Students will achieve active control of Chinese sound system and writing system. They will be able to understand and respond to greetings, as well as talk about family members, time, hobbies and friends. They will learn nearly 200 characters. 

 

CHIN 103—Chinese III

MWF 1:40-2:30pm Hong Chen

CHIN103 builds on the knowledge and skills gained in CHIN 101-102. This course develops conversational skills by using fundamental grammatical patterns and vocabulary in functional contexts. 

Outcome: Students will learn dialogues used in the contexts of dinning out, studying in library, asking directions, attending birthday party, seeing a doctor, and dating.

 

ENGL 315C—South Asian Literature since 1900

TuTh 11:30am-12:45pm Harveen Mann

 

FNAR 357—South Asian Visual Culture

MWF 11:30am-12:20pm Sarita Heer

 

HIST 209—East Asia Since 1500

TuTh 8:30-9:45am Mark Allee

TuTh 10:00-11:15am Mark Allee

TuTh 8:30-9:45am Elena Valussi (WTC)

TuTh 10:00-11:15am Elena Valussi (WTC)

 

HIST 296—Women in East Asia

TuTh 1:00-2:15pm Elena Valussi (WTC)

This course studies the lives of Asian women in China, Japan, and Korea from early modern times to the present by examining changing roles of women and how these changes have come about.

Outcome: Students will be able to explain how life reflects law in the political, social, economic and cultural history of Asian women; how imperialism and war have affected women; how women have effected change. 

 

HIST 345—Reform & Revolution China 1800-1949

TuTh 1:00-2:15pm Mark Allee

 

HNDI 101—Hindi-Urdu I

MoWe 5:30-6:45pm Vijay Shah

 

HONR 209B—Encountering Asia

TuTh 1:00-2:15pm Kathleen Adams

TuTh 11:30am-12:45pm Tracy Pintchman

TuTh 2:30-3:45pm Michael Agliardo

 

JAPN 101—Japanese I

MWF 9:20-10:10am Janet Fair

This course introduces the four basic communicative skills in Japanese: listening, speaking, reading, and writing.  Students gain knowledge of Japanese culture and ways of thinking which provide the context for communicating in Japanese.  No previous knowledge of Japanese is required.

Outcome: Students will be able to understand and respond to greetings, introductions, and basic question about time, location, and directions and will be able to read and write hiragana and katakana, the two phonetic Japanese scripts as well as about 25 ideographic characters. 

 

JAPN 103—Japanese III

MWF 12:35-1:25PM Heather Bowen-Struyk

Students will expand their knowledge of Japanese vocabulary, grammar, usage, and speech levels, using Japanese as a medium for learning Japanese

Outcome: Students will use written and spoken Japanese to ask for and express opinions, to ask for assistance, and to participate in a variety of written and verbal social routines. 

 

LITR 245—Asian Masterpieces

Mo (2:45-4:25pm) We (2:45-3:35pm) Hong Chen

 

LITR 287—Topics in Asian Literature

MWF 1:40-2:30pm David Posner

 

SOCL 122—Race and Ethnic Relations

TuTh 2:30-3:45pm David Embrick

MWF 9:20-10:10am Staff

This course examines the development of cultural, society, and self-understanding by exploring the social construction of race in the United States. The course explores how social constructions of race affect interpersonal relations, laws, policies, and practices in various racial and ethnic communities.

Outcome: Students will be able to demonstrate understanding of the conditions which have worsened racial tensions as well as how social movements have been successful at eradicating racially oppressive laws and working towards a just society. 

 

SOCL 250—Inequality in Society

TuTh 2:30-3:45pm Judson Everitt

This course examines the manner in which contemporary society is divided by race, ethnicity, class, sexuality and gender, and the impact of social institutions on these divisions. An emphasis will be placed on income/wealth differences, status differences, class conflict and social conflict over time.

Outcome: Students will acquire a better understanding of social inequality and what can be done to make society more just.

 

SOWK 370—Ethnicity, Race and Culture

TuTh 10:00-11:15am Staff

This course examines economic, social, institutional and political forces that shape the experiences and life chances of persons within Asian, Latino, and Native American cultures. Social and economic justice in relation to diversity will be explored.
Students will understand the relevance of diversity to social work values and interventions. 

 

THEO 282—Introduction to Hinduism

Th 4:15-6:45pm Yarina Liston

Outcome: Students will be able to demonstrate understanding of the most important Hindu scriptures, the general outline of the historical evolution of Hinduism, the key Hindu concepts, terms, values, and religious practices, and the basic narratives and imagery of Hinduism.

 

THEO 295—Introduction to Islam

We 4:15-6:45pm Omer Mozaffar

We 7:00-9:30pm Omer Mozaffar

Mo 7:00-9:30pm Azam Nizamuddin

TuTh 1:00-2:15pm Marcia Hermansen

TuTh 2:30-3:45pm Marcia Hermansen

Outcome: Students will be able to demonstrate understanding of the most important Muslim scriptures, the general outline of the historical evolution of Islam, the key Islamic concepts, terms, values, and religious practices, and the diversity within Islam. 

 

THEO 297—Introduction to Buddhism

MWF 2:45-3:35pm Hugh Nicholson

Mo 4:15-6:45pm Staff

Tu 4:15-6:45pm Staff

Outcome: Students will be able to demonstrate understanding of the most important Buddhist scriptures, the general outline of the historical evolution of Buddhism, including its different major branches, and the key Buddhist concepts, terms, values, and religious practices. 

 

For a complete list of BEIJ and VIET courses, please visit their websites at: http://www.thebeijingcenter.org/programs/semester-abroad/academics/courses/fall-2014-2/

http://www.luc.edu/studyabroad/vietnam.shtml

Loyola

Asian Studies
Department of History
Crown Center, 5th Floor, 1032 W. Sheridan Road, Chicago,IL 60660 ยท 773.508.2238
asianstudies@luc.edu

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