Loyola University Chicago

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Loyola University Chicago

Department of Biology

James M. Calcagno

 

  Professor
Department Anthropology
Coffey Hall 401
1032 W. Sheridan Road
Chicago, Illinois 60660
(773) 508-3472
(773) 508-3295 (fax)
(773) 508-3029 (Fellowship Office; Sullivan Hall 285)
E-mail: jcalcag@luc.edu

RESEARCH INTERESTS

Dr. Calcagno is a biological anthropologist with research and teaching interests in paleoanthropology, dental anthropology, primate behavioral ecology, and evolutionary anthropology. He has conducted research in Denmark, England, Italy, Kenya, South Africa, and Uganda, as well as closer to home in Chicago. He is an advocate of four-field anthropology and holistic, biocultural approaches to the study of humanity.

Dr. Calcagno is also the Director of the Loyola Fellowship Office, focusing on increasing the number and success rate of applications from Loyola students for prestigious national awards, such as those listed at: www.luc.edu/fellowshipoffice

Current Research Activities

Dr. Calcagno's most recent research interests pertain to perhaps the most fundamental question of anthropology: What makes us human? Along those lines, he has co-organized two Wiley- Blackwell symposia at recent meetings of the American Association of Physical Anthropologists (AAPA). In 2009, he collaborated with Dr. Agustin Fuentes, University of Notre Dame, to investigate the integration of evolutionary perspectives and biocultural approaches toward a better understanding of human natures and human cultures. In 2011, he began working with Dr. Ben Campbell, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, to examine what biological anthropologists can offer to those outside of anthropology who are also interested in what makes us human.

Selected Publications Reflecting Research Interests and Undergraduate* Co-Authorship

2011 And Thanks for Asking!: Some Answers to What Makes Us Human? from Biological Anthropology. American Journal of Physical Anthropology, 144 (Suppl. 52): 101.

2010 Monogamy and Sexual Diversity in Primates: Can Evolutionary Biology Contribute to Christian Social Ethics? In: God, Science, Sex, Gender: An Interdisciplinary Approach to Christian Ethics. University of Illinois Press, pp. 155-166.

2009 Evolution, culture, and the role of biological anthropology. American Journal of Physical Anthropology, 138 (Suppl. 48): 145.

2003 Keeping Biological Anthropology in Anthropology, and Anthropology in Biology. American Anthropologist, 105(1):6-15. (Guest editor of Special AA Issue)

2002 Longitudinal study of delayed reproductive success in a pair of white-cheeked gibbons (Hylobates leucogenys). (Co-authored with K Lukas, RT Barkauskas, SA Maher*, BA Jacobs, JE Bauman, & AJ Henderson) Zoo Biology, 21:413-434.

1999 Social interactions between captive adult male and infant lowland gorillas: Implications regarding kin selection and zoo management. (Co-authored with AE Enciso* & KC Gold) Zoo Biology, 18: 53-62.

1996 Spatial and behavioral use of an outdoor habitat by the white-cheeked gibbon (Hylobates leucogenys). (Co-authored with CS Klein*, KC Gold, & M Gies), 1996 Regional Conference Proceedings of the American Zoo and Aquarium Association, pp. 628-632.

1995 Environmental enrichment effects of bedding material on nonsocial and abnormal behavior of captive gorillas (Gorilla gorilla gorilla). (Co-authored with DL Brown*, KC Gold, & SD Thompson) 1995 Regional Conference Proceedings of the American Zoo and Aquarium Association, pp. 29-35.

1993 Reproductive behavior in captive red ruffed lemurs (Varecia variegata rubra). (Co- authored with AA Sabor*) 1993 Regional Conference Proceedings of the American Association of Zoological Parks and Aquariums, pp. 292-299.

1993 Possible third molar impactions in early hominids. (Co-authored with KR Gibson) American Journal of Physical Anthropology, 91:517-521.

1991 Selective Compromise: Evolutionary Trends and Mechanisms in Hominid Tooth Size. (Co-authored with KR Gibson) IN: Advances in Dental Anthropology, MA Kelley & CS Larsen (eds). New York: Wiley-Liss. Chapter 5, pp. 59-76.

1989 Mechanisms of Human Dental Reduction: A Case Study from PostPleistocene Nubia. Lawrence: University of Kansas Publications in Anthropology, Volume 18.

1988 Human dental reduction: Natural selection or the probable mutation effect? (Co- authored with KR Gibson) American Journal of Physical Anthropology, 77:505-517.

1986 Dental reduction in postPleistocene Nubia. American Journal of Physical Anthropology, 70: 349-363.

1981 On the applicability of sexing human skeletal material by discriminant function analysis. Journal of Human Evolution, 10: 189198.



Loyola

Loyola University Chicago · 1032 W. Sheridan Road, Chicago,IL 60660
Phone: 773.508.3620 · Fax: 773.508.3646 · E-mail: biologydept@luc.edu

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