Loyola University Chicago

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Loyola University Chicago

Department of Biology

M.S. in Biology: Course Offerings

300-Level Courses
These Courses May only Be Taken as Bio. 495 Courses.
  • BIOL 511. Biology Teaching Practicum (2 credit hrs.)
  • BIOL 595. Thesis Supervision (no credit)
  • BIOL 605. Master's Study

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Students study the fundamental logic of the scientific method, look for its elements to analyze papers, and apply it to write and to prepare oral presentations.

Seminars by graduate students on specific, current research topics are presented.

Graduate students will meet and discuss the research presented by five or six speakers.

An introduction to the fundamentals of teaching biology. Topics include course planning, lecture preparation and presentation, lab teaching and evaluation. The lab component involves presentations in undergraduate biology courses.

Prerequisite: 251. The analysis of developmental processes such as spermatogenesis, oogenesis, fertilization, embryonic cleavage, cell determination and differentiation in selected species. Emphasis will be on experiments that reveal how these processes are controlled.

Prerequisites: BIOL 102 & 112 or 125; PSYC. 101, 304 and 306. A "hands-on" experience with the instrumentation, measurement techniques and experimental designs used in electrophysiological studies of nervous system function.

Prerequisites: BIOL 302, 282 and CHEM 224. Concepts of microbial life, physiology, biochemistry and immunology. Topics covered in the course include microbial methods, nature, metabolism, biosynthesis, environmental effects and differences among microorganisms.

Prerequisites: 251, 282. Lecture and laboratory. The study of the nature and chemical basis of the immune responses. History and vocabulary of immunology; experiments involving immune recognition and destruction; theories regarding self-tolerance and immunological diseases.

Prerequisite: BIOL 282, 302, CHEM 224 or instructor's permission. Fundamentals of microbe-host interactions and microbial diseases. Microbial mechanisms of pathogenicity are examined, as are in-depth readings and discussion of specific microbial diseases.

Prerequisite: 251. A course designed to consider symptomatology, modes of transmission, physical and chemical properties of viruses with special emphasis on their biological relationships and recent advances in virus research.

Prerequisite: 282; 265 recommended. An overview of evolutionary change as seen in the fossil record, including rates and direction of evolution. Focuses on the mechanisms of evolutionary change: natural selection, genetic drift, mutation, migration. Discussions highlight recent controversies within the field.

Prerequisite: 102 & 112 or 125 or permission. Interdisciplinary. The biological basis of animal behavior, including function and evolution of behavioral patterns.

Prerequisites: 251, 282. Lecture and laboratory. A study of homologous systems and vertebrate phylogeny.

Prerequisite: 102 & 112 or 125. Interrelations between the behavior and ecology of monkeys, apes and prosimians. Problems of conservation and management. Implications for human behavior.

Prerequisite: 102 & 112 or 125. Interrelations between the behavior and ecology of monkeys, apes and prosimians. Problems of conservation and management. Implications for human behavior.

Prerequisite: BIOL 102 & 112 or 125; ANTH 101 or 103 or NTSC 104. Lecture. Introduction to skeletal anatomy, along with various methods and techniques currently employed by physical anthropologists to ascertain age at death, sex & diseases of past human populations.

Prerequisites: MATH 132 or 162 and BIOL 102 & 112 or 125. An introduction to statistical methods used in designing biological experiments and in data analyses. Topics include probability and sampling distribution, designed biological experiments and analysis of variance, regression and correlation, stochastic processes, and frequency distributions. Computer laboratory assignments with biological data will be performed.

Prerequisite: 251. Lecture and laboratory. Microscopic anatomy of animal cells and tissues. Structural patterns of tissues in vertebrate organs.

Prerequisite: BIOL 251. A non-laboratory introduction to the structure of the human body. While major emphasis will be placed on structure at the gross level, tissue structure, embryogenesis, organogenesis and physiological correlates will also be considered.

Prerequisite: 265, 282. The social behavior of animals with an emphasis on the evolutionary and ecological determinants of those behaviors.

Prerequisites: BIOL 251 and CHEM 222 or 224. Lecture and laboratory. Animal function and structure; emphasis on humans and other vertebrates as basis for understanding organ physiology. Functional relationships stressed. Feeding, digestion, water relations, respiration, hormone systems, receptor and effector mechanisms, central nervous coordination, regulation of homeostasis, dynamics of the circulatory system and the physiology of bone and musculature.

Prerequisite: 350. Survey of hormones that regulate metabolism, salt and water balance, calcium and phosphorus metabolism, and reproduction; special emphasis on hormonal transduction signal integration of endocrine systems.

Prerequisite: 251. Anatomy and physiology of male and female reproductive systems, fertilization, implantation, pregnancy, and birth; immunological aspects of reproduction.

Prerequisites: BIOL 251, 265, 282. Introduction to animal agents and vectors of human disease. Topics will include life cycles of parasites, epidemiology, immunological aspects, and current research on related tropical diseases.

Prerequisites: BIOL 251. Developmental Neurobiology will focus on cellular and molecular underpinnings of the development of neuronal features of the nervous system. Topics include neural induction and subsequent differentiation events, regulation of neuronal survival, axon guidance, target selection, and synaptogenesis.

Prerequisite: 265 or permission of chairperson. Ecological study of an area in North America outside Midwest. Includes a field trip to specific region. Trip is at student expense.

Prerequisite: 251. The study of neurons and nervous systems. The purpose of this course is to introduce major principles and concepts in modern neurobiology. An emphasis is placed upon an understanding of the electrophysiology of the neuron and the manner in which groups of neurons are organized into functional nervous systems subserving sensory, motor, or integrative functions.

Prerequisite: 265. Lecture and laboratory. Insects and related arthropods of medical, public health and veterinary importance. Relationships between vectors, pathogens and hosts.

Prerequisites: BIOL 251 and CHEM 224 or equivalent. Lecture and laboratory. The molecular basis of cellular structure and the biochemical reactions which make this structure possible.<

Prerequisite: 265. Lecture and laboratory. Focuses on plant population dynamics: plant animal interactions, including herbivory, pollination, dispersal; plant community dynamics, such as the processes of succession; and the effect of global climate on the distribution of major vegetation types. The Laboratory is divided between weekend field trips to local forests, prairies, bogs and laboratory studies.

Prerequisite: 265. Lecture and laboratory and/or field trips. Systematics, phylogeny, anatomy, physiology, behavior, functional morphology and ecology of fishes. Includes field collecting trips in Lake Michigan and local streams and lakes and individual projects/ research papers.

Prerequisites: BIOL 265 and CHEM 102 or 106. Lecture and Laboratory. Study of various physical, chemical, and ecological aspects of Lake Michigan, with emphasis on field study, techniques, and discussions of recent research and the impact of humans on Lake Michigan biology. Laboratory exercises emphasize fish ecology.

Prerequisites: BIOL 362 and either PSYC 240 or PSYC 305, or both PSYC 240 and 305 and PSYC 311. The first of two laboratory courses intended for neuroscience minors. The course will cover anatomical, physiological, behavioral, and neurocomputational approaches to the study of the nervous system and the brain. This course will emphasize learning basic neuroscience laboratory techniques.

Prerequisite: BIOL 373. The second of two laboratory courses intended for neuroscience minors. The course will cover anatomical, physiological, behavioral, neurocomputational approaches to the study of the nervous system and the brain. This course will help prepare students to conduct independent research projects. Students will conduct one independent research project during the last part of the course.

Prerequisite: BIOL 265. The classification and ecology of insects that have become fully or partially adapted to the aquatic environment. Emphasis will be on the ecology and biology (behavior, physiology and phylogeny) of aquatic insects. Students will acquire an understanding of the ecological relationships between aquatic insects and their physical and biological environment, including their interactions with humans. The course includes laboratory field trips to local aquatic habitats.

Prerequisites: Senior standing as Biology Major or permission of instructor. The object of this course is an intensive inquiry into established knowledge and current research in the biology of the elasmobranch fishes. This seminar course stresses reading in the current literature, student-led discussion and presentation of recent findings in the anatomy, behavior, physiology, ecology and evolution of sharks and their relatives, the skates and rays. An optional field trip to Florida for a limited number of students during the semester provides an opportunity to observe elasmobranchs in both the laboratory and at sea. The field trip experience may not always be offered and does not count as part of the grade.

Prerequisites: 341 or permission of instructor. An introduction to the principles and techniques employed in preparing/ using biological specimens for transmission and scanning electron microscopy.

Lecture. Prerequisite: 350. Principles and mechanisms of drug action. Topics discussed include drug-receptor interaction, pharmacokinetics, drug distribution, metabolism, and neuro-transmission, blood-brain barrier, and toxicology.

Prerequisites: BIOL 251, 282, 283 and CHEM 222 or 224. An intensive laboratory course in the basic principles and techniques of molecular biology, including cloning, restriction mapping, nucleic acid hybridization, polymerase chain reaction, and DNA sequencing. Short independent research projects are a required component. Substantial amount of time in the laboratory will be required outside the regular class periods.

The nature, diversity, functional ecology, and evolutionary relationship of both prokaryotic and eukaryotic microbes with relationship to higher organisms are discussed. (Castignetti, Kelly)

Microbial nutrition and metabolism, both aerobic and anaerobic are presented. Aspects of anabolism and catabolism are studied in relation to microbial physiology and diversity. (Castignetti. Kelly)

Experimental approach to advanced topics including cell-cell interactions, growth factor control, pattern formation, and cell lineage, using mammalian and nonmammallian models. (Wasserman)

Experimental approach to advanced topics in eukaryotic molecular genetics. (Boussy, Doering, Laten, Pickett)

The following topics are treated: structure and function of cell components; modifications of cells in differentiation and injury; and cytological techniques and methods for the study of subcellular fractions. (Wasserman)

Analysis of molecular mechanisms responsible for controlling gene expression in plants and animals with an emphasis on experimental methods.

This course is a survey of organ-system functions in vertebrate organisms, including discussions related to the evolution of physiological mechanisms and to the process by which animal species adapt to different types of environments and/or adjust to changing conditions within a given habitat. (Rotermund, Suter)

Techniques and experimental work with protozoa, helminth and arthropod parasites are conducted. Recent developments in the physiology and biochemistry of parasites and their life cycles are also treated.

Lecture and laboratory. An introduction to the study of lakes and streams. The course includes discussion of physical and chemical factors, the biota, production, and community dynamics. Laboratories include field trips to local aquatic habitats. (Tuchman)

An in-depth survey of the structure and function of different wetland ecosystems emphasizing interactive biogeochemical factors. Methods of wetland creation and restoration are explored. Laboratories include several field trips to a diversity of wetland habitat types. (Tuchman)

The biology of insects from morphology to control is presented. Lab emphasis is on insect identification and anatomy. (Hamilton)

Neurobiological, hormonal, chronobiological, and environmental aspects of the physiology and anatomy of reproductive systems of vertebrate animals. Gametogenesis, mating behavior, pregnancy, lactation, sexual differentiation, puberty, and evolutionary theories about sex are discussed. Emphasis is placed on reading primary and secondary scientific literature and on developing skills in hypothesis formulation and experimental design. (Suter)

An advanced ecology course focusing on one of the following areas: disturbance and succession, plant-herbivore interactions, pollinational ecology, or dispersal ecology. It includes reading of key papers and an independent research proposal. (Tuchman)

This course deals with analysis of factors regulating abundance and distribution of organisms. Experimental approaches will be emphasized. (Savitz)

The design and analysis of biological experiments using parametric and nonparametric inferential statistics. It includes the use of computerized statistical packages. (Berg, Boussy)

The classification and ecology of insects that have become fully or partially adapted to the aquatic environment. Emphasis will be on the ecology and biology (behavior, physiology and phylogeny) of aquatic insects. Students will acquire an understanding of the ecological relationships between aquatic insects and their physical and biological environment, including their interactions with humans. The course includes laboratory field trips to local aquatic habitats.

This course focuses on the most recent developments in the field of endocrinology. Topics will include hypothalamic-pituitary relationships and gonadal functions. In addition, specific surgical, radioimmunoassay, and radioisotopic techniques will be discussed. (Suter)

A comprehensive survey of the molecular biology of the gene. The course will cover contemporary knowledge about gene structure and function primarily in bacteria, including protein synthesis, control of RNA synthesis, DNA structure and replication. (Laten)

This course deals with the principles of population genetics emphasizing experimental evidence for the dynamic properties of genes in population. Ecological genetics, the impact of molecular biology and quantitative inheritance will be discussed. (Boussy)

An introduction to the principles and techniques employed in preparing biological specimens for transmission and scanning electron microscopy. (Jones)

Supervised reading in a specific area of biology not covered by other graduate courses is conducted. This is not intended to substitute for reading in the specific area of thesis research. (Staff)

A comprehensive study in selected topics and recent developments in a particular field of biology. (Staff)

Loyola

Loyola University Chicago · 1032 W. Sheridan Road, Chicago,IL 60660
Phone: 773.508.3620 · Fax: 773.508.3646 · E-mail: biologydept@luc.edu

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