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Music of the Jesuit Missions

Music of the Jesuit Missions

A local church in Chiquitania

Spring Colloquium

Wednesday, April 10, 2013, from 10:00 AM - 4:00 PM
All events are free and open to the public

Loyola University Chicago
1032 W. Sheridan Rd.
Chicago, IL 60660

The Hank Center for the Catholic Intellectual Heritage presents a research colloquium: Music of the Jesuit Missions. This colloquium will explore the history, traditions, and efforts to restore and re-introduce the colonial music of Latin America.

The focus of the project has been to research the Jesuit contribution to music education in nomadic indigenous populations’ communities usually called reducciones. The reducciones were first established by European missionaries in the 16th century. The Jesuits arrived to the continent a few decades later and created slightly different communities: they allowed indigenous people to practice and preserve their traditions while at the same time providing European education, including music composition and performance.

The colloquium will focus on the Jesuit missions in Chiquitania, a region located in Eastern Bolivia. Over the course of 70 years, the Jesuits founded eleven settlements in the region. The missions were self-sufficient, had thriving economies, and were virtually autonomous from the Spanish crown.  They also built churches with a distinct style that combined Indigenous and European architecture and decoration styles. In instructing the people of Chiquitania, these humble Jesuit priests found an effective way to teach both music performance and composition. 

The missions of the Chiquitos, comprised of six towns, are the last remaining Jesuit settlements in Bolivia. Inspired by the idea of the “ideal city,” these settlements preserved their unique life style, architecture, and remarkable musical heritage.  These missions are included on the UNESCO World Heritage List.

After the Jesuit expulsion in 1767, Chiquitano Indians, the original inhabitants, tried to preserve their musical legacy for two centuries. Nevertheless, many music scores were forgotten or damaged.  Loyola University Chicago professor of music, Dr. Gustavo Leone embarked on a three year project to restore, preserve, and reintroduce to contemporary audiences this invaluable musical heritage. “I was inspired to learn more about music as a tool for evangelization,” Dr. Gustavo Leone explained what motivated him to start the project.

In 2010 he travelled to the missions in Bolivia, where he photographed the scores and spent long hours painstakingly restoring the manuscripts.

Newly restored manuscripts from the music archives of the Chiquitos and the Cathedral of Durango will be discussed and performed in concert as part of the colloquium.

 

COLLOQUIUM  PROGRAM:

Presentations

• 10:00 AM -11:00 AM Lecture

Music Archives of Chiquitos: The Restoration of Manuscripts

Dr. Gustavo Leone, Professor, Department of Fine and Performing Arts, Loyola University Chicago

• 11:00 AM-12:00 AM: Lecture
That’s how Beautiful these Naked  Barbarians Sing
Music of the Jesuit reductions and the narratives of civilization

Dr. Jutta Toelle, Faculty at Institüt Fur Musikwissenschaft und Medienwissenschaft, Universität zu Berlin, Humboldt

 

Break

 

Presentation

• 1:00 PM-2:00 PM Lecture,

The Global, the Local, the Stereotyped, and the Imagined: Reviving New Spanish Music

Dr. Drew Edward Davies, Associate Professor of Musicology, Northwestern University, Chicago

 

Panel Discussion

• 2:00 PM -2:45 PM 

Dr. Gustavo Leone, Professor, Department of Fine and Performing Arts, Loyola University Chicago

Dr. Jutta Toelle, Faculty at Institüt Fur Musikwissenschaft und Medienwissenschaft, Universität zu Berlin, Humboldt

Dr. Drew Edward Davies, Associate Professor of Musicology, Northwestern University, Chicago

Dr. Hector Garcia, Professor of Spanish Literature, Loyola University Chicago

Dr. Robbert Kendrick, Professor of Music, University of Chicago

 

Free Concert

3:00 PM -4:00 PM

Madonna della Strada Chapel

Bella Voce, directed by Andrew Lewis

Chicago Arts Orchestra, directed by Javier José Mendoza.