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Loyola University Chicago

Department of Classical Studies

Descriptions - courses currently scheduled

 

Descriptions of Courses Currently Scheduled by the Department of Classical Studies


Spring 2014   

University Core Literary Foundations (Taught in Translation)    

Interpreting Literature with Dr. Edith Pennoyer (Penny) Livermore    
Literary Knowledge Tier 1 - Skills of Critical Thinking
UCLR 100-12C.....Class #4092.....M-W-F.....9:20am-10:10am.....MUND-605

Interpreting Literature with Dr. Anna Peterson    
Literary Knowledge Tier 1 - Skills of Critical Thinking
UCLR 100-13C.....Class #4556.....M-W-F.....2:45pm-3:35pm.....MUND-609

Interpreting Literature with Dr. James Keenan    
Literary Knowledge Tier 1 - Skills of Critical Thinking
UCLR 100-14C.....Class #4894.....T-Th.....10:00am-11:15am.....CS-313

Classical Studies (Taught in Translation)    

English Use of Greek and Latin with Instructor to be Determined    
enrollment restricted to students of St Joseph Seminary
CLST 131-K01.....Class #2099.....TBA.....TBA.....TBA

Religions of Ancient Greece with Dr. Laura Gawlinski    
departmental elective
CLST 241-001.....Class #4912.....M-W-F.....12:35pm-1:25pm.....MUND-506

This course will examine the rituals and beliefs of the ancient Greeks through the literary, historical, epigraphical, archaeological, and art historical records. The critical interpretation of both textual and visual sources will play a large role in the course, and emphasis will be placed on the benefits and limitations of the sources for Greek religion. In addition to the reading of ancient texts, images of myth and cult on vases, dedications, and architectural sculpture will be examined, and minor deities and small shrines will be added to the "big picture" in order to give a richer view of religious expression in antiquity. The course will explore most of the major topics and problems in the study of Greek religion: myth vs. cult, sacred spaces, the influence of politics and economics, the role of gender, the relationship of magic to religion, prophecy and divination, theories about animal sacrifice, rites of passage, personal and communal piety, and mystery cults from the Eleusinian Mysteries to early Christianity.

Classical Mythology with Dr.  Edith Pennoyer (Penny) Livermore    
Literary Knowledge Tier 2 - Skills of Critical Thinking
CLST 271-001.....Class #1077.....M-W-F.....11:30am-12:20pm.....MUND-520

Classical Mythology with Dr.  Anna Peterson    
Literary Knowledge Tier 2 - Skills of Critical Thinking
CLST 271-002.....Class #1078.....M-W-F.....10:25am-11:15am.....MUND-406

Classical Mythology with Dr.  Patricia Graham-Skoul    
Literary Knowledge Tier 2 - Skills of Critical Thinking
CLST 271-003.....Class #1079.....T-Th.....10:00am-11:15am.....DU-230

Classical Mythology with Dr.  Edith Pennoyer (Penny) Livermore    
Literary Knowledge Tier 2 - Skills of Critical Thinking
CLST 271-004.....Class #1891.....T-Th.....11:30am-12:45pm.....DU-235

Classical Mythology with Dr.  Edith Pennoyer (Penny) Livermore    
Literary Knowledge Tier 2 - Skills of Critical Thinking
CLST 271-005.....Class #4902.....T.....7:00pm-9:30pm.....DU-228

Heroes & Classical Epics with Dr. Jonathan Mannering    
Literary Knowledge Tier 2 - Skills of Critical Thinking
CLST 272-001.....Class #1080.....M-W-F.....9:20am-10:10am.....CUN-217

This course centers upon the key epics of the ancient Greek and Roman worlds, their nature and significance, and, especially, the concepts of heroes and heroism. Topics of interest include and are not limited to: power and the construction of individual authority; strife and healing, both interpersonal and societal; ethnicity and cultural identity; family, household and community; gender; leadership and trust; war, its causes and costs; narrative technique. Outcome: Students should be able to demonstrate knowledge of ancient epic as a literary genre, what heroes are and why they are featured in epics, and how epics began and evolved to reflect audiences and their social, cultural, political and other concerns, values (such as leadership) beliefs and practices. Writing assignments will emphasize scrupulous analysis and pointed adducement of textual evidence to substantiate broader claims about theme and meaning.

Heroes & Classical Epics with Dr. Jonathan Mannering    
Literary Knowledge Tier 2 - Skills of Critical Thinking
CLST 272-002.....Class #1081.....M-W-F.....10:25am-11:15am.....CUN-217

This course centers upon the key epics of the ancient Greek and Roman worlds, their nature and significance, and, especially, the concepts of heroes and heroism. Topics of interest include and are not limited to: power and the construction of individual authority; strife and healing, both interpersonal and societal; ethnicity and cultural identity; family, household and community; gender; leadership and trust; war, its causes and costs; narrative technique. Outcome: Students should be able to demonstrate knowledge of ancient epic as a literary genre, what heroes are and why they are featured in epics, and how epics began and evolved to reflect audiences and their social, cultural, political and other concerns, values (such as leadership) beliefs and practices. Writing assignments will emphasize scrupulous analysis and pointed adducement of textual evidence to substantiate broader claims about theme and meaning.

Heroes & Classical Epics with Dr. Anna Peterson    
Literary Knowledge Tier 2 - Skills of Critical Thinking
CLST 272-003.....Class #1082.....T-Th.....11:30am-12:45pm.....CC-142

Heroes & Classical Epics with Dr. Edith Pennoyer (Penny) Livermore    
Literary Knowledge Tier 2 - Skills of Critical Thinking
CLST 272-004.....Class #3208.....T-Th.....2:30pm-3:45pm.....DU-235

"Quae regio in terris nostris non plena laboris?" [What land on Earth is not filled with our Work? - Virgil, Aeneid 1.420]
A beloved verse from Virgil, embedded in mosaic in the vestibule of the Madonna De la Strada Chapel and appropriated, for the Jesuit Order, from its original context with regard to the laborious policies and projects of the expansion of Rome, could also be applied to the majesty and might of the exacting study of ancient Epic. For the Epic has indeed pervaded Western literary tradition in the footprints and the dreams of these enduringly human characters and events which have survived, and shall survive, as long as these songs and stories. The purpose of this Course, with its exacting study through ancillary scholarship, is to raise our consciousness of these enduring human values and of their relevance to the heroic, and even to the non-heroic, in our own quotidian lives -- the heroes, both song and unsung, the singers and the silent, whose labors have extended and survived throughout all corners of earth. Because, as Homer wrote in both the Iliad and the Odyssey, the events in Epic were all ordained by Zeus "in order that there might be a song for those yet to be born."

Classical Tragedy with Dr. Lauren Schwartzman    
Literary Knowledge Tier 2 - Skills of Critical Thinking
CLST 273-001.....Class #1084.....M-W-F.....11:30am-12:20pm.....DU-234

Classical Tragedy with Dr. Patricia Graham-Skoul    
Literary Knowledge Tier 2 - Skills of Critical Thinking
CLST 273-002.....Class #2954.....T-Th.....2:30pm-3:45pm.....MUND-506

Classical Tragedy with Dr. Kirk Shellko     
Literary Knowledge Tier 2 - Skills of Critical Thinking
CLST 273-004.....Class #4067.....W.....7:00pm-9:30pm.....DU-230

Classical Tragedy introduces students to the authors, social contexts and performances of ancient Greek drama. Students will learn how to interpret the "myth" presented on the ancient Greek stage and how to apply what they have learned to detect and interpret the moral, social and political issues raised in them. They will learn the names, works and careers of the principal tragedians, Aeschylus, Sophocles, and Euripides. Students will learn to assess the formal and aesthetic properties of the works of different tragedians. Emphasis will be given to specifics of performance and seeing a play in the "theater of the mind" as well as gaining command of relevant terminology, e.g., parodos, peripeteia, mimesis, catharsis, etc. Students will learn to outline the plot, argument and key themes of each work clearly and will gain an understanding of the historical context and social conditions motivating each work. The main themes of Greek tragedy (e.g., power, gender, justice, violence etc.) invite comparison to themes of contemporary theater and film. Students will acquire an awareness of ancient Greek tragedy in its connection with our own theatrical and literary culture, and will understand the influence of Greek drama on modern stage and literature. They will be able to employ several concepts in the analysis of Classical Tragedy.

World of Classical Greece with Dr. Brian Lavelle    
Historical Knowledge Tier 2 - Skills of Critical Thinking
CLST 275-001.....Class #4903.....T-Th.....1:00pm-2:15pm.....DU-228

Classical Rhetoric (Writing Intensive) with Dr. Jonathan Mannering    
Literary Knowledge Tier 2 - Skills of Critical Thinking
CLST 279-01W.....Class #4904.....M-W-F.....1:40pm-2:20pm.....DU-235

Classical Comedy and Satire with Dr. Gregory Dobrov    
Literary Knowledge Tier 2 - Skills of Critical Thinking
CLST 283-001.....Class #4905.....M-W-F.....12:35pm-1:25pm.....CC-140

Introduction to Classical Archaeology (cross-list ANTH 334, HIST 300B) with Dr. Laura Gawlinski    
departmental elective
CLST 334-001.....Class #4905.....M-W-F.....10:25am-11:15am.....MUND-520

This course examines the process, history, and discoveries of classical archaeology. By using sites and objects from Greece, Italy, and Turkey as case studies, students will be introduced to the methods for uncovering information and analyzing the resulting data and materials. We will also consider how the discipline has changed over time and what its relationship has been to classical philology, anthropology, history, and art history. At the same time, we will explore the role of the classical archaeologist in conserving, protecting, and presenting the past, with reference to ethical issues like looting, repatriation, and the antiquities trade.

The Humanism of Antiquity II with Dr. Jacqueline Long    
departmental major capstone
CLST 384-001.....Class #1085.....Th.....4:15pm-6:45pm.....SULL-202

In this capstone course, students from the Department's different majors (and the Latin minor; Greek and Classical Civilization minors at their choice) will bring their individual knowledge and judgment together in shared inquiry into how selected important Roman texts develop ideas about the human person. What did Roman civilization contribute to the ongoing conversation about individuals' relationships with one another, with their community, with the state, with other peoples, with the natural world, and with the transcendent? How did the course of Roman history frame Roman society, culture, and values? And how can we today advance our understanding of this part of our past?

Theories of Myth (cross-list LITR 392) with Dr. James Keenan    
departmental elective
CLST 392-001.....Class #4907.....T-Th.....2:30pm-3:45pm.....MUND-621

Ancient Greek    

Ancient Greek II with Dr. Gregory Dobrov    
pre-requisite: GREK 101 or equivalent
GREK 102-001.....Class #1894.....M-W-F.....1:40pm-2:30pm.....CC-140

Introduction to Greek Oratory with Dr. Gregory Dobrov    
pre-requisite: GREK 101-102 or equivalent
GREK 275-001.....Class #4908.....F.....4:15pm-6:45pm.....CC-572

Readings in Greek Literature II with Dr. Gregory Dobrov    
pre-requisite: third-semester GREK or equivalent
GREK 389-001.....Class #4911.....F.....4:15pm-6:45pm.....CC-572

Latin    

Latin II with Dr. John Makowski    
pre-requisite: LATN 101 or equivalent
LATN 102-001.....Class #1893.....M-W-F.....9:20am-10:10am.....DU-234

Latin II with Fr. John Kilgallen, S.J.    
enrollment restricted to students of St Joseph Seminary
pre-requisite: LATN 101 or equivalent
LATN 102-K01.....Class #2157.....M-W-F.....11:30am-12:20am.....MUND-308

Age of Augustus with Dr. John Makowski    
pre-requisite: LATN 101-102 or equivalent
LATN 284-001.....Class #4909.....M-W-F.....11:30am-12:20Pm.....DU-124

Latin Verse with Dr. John Makowski    
pre-requisite: third-semester LATN or equivalent
LATN 343-001.....Class #6024.....M-W-F.....11:30am-12:20Pm.....DU-124


Summer 2014   

Art of Ancient Greece (cross-listed with FNAR 336) with Dr. Brian Lavelle    
Rome Center Summer Inter-Session
Artistic Knowledge - Skills of Critical Thinking
CLST 206-001.....Class # 2592.....M-T-W-Th-F....9:00am-4:00pm.....on-site in Greece

Classical Mythology with Dr. Greg Dobrov   
Lakeshore Campus Summer Session A
Tier 2 Literary Knowledge - Skills of Critical Thinking
CLST 271-001.....Class # 1765.....M-T-W-Th....10:25am-12:05pm.....LSB 212

Classical Mythology with Dr. Alexander Evers   
Lakeshore Campus Summer Session B
Tier 2 Literary Knowledge - Skills of Critical Thinking
CLST 271-002.....Class # 2437.....M-T-W-Th....10:25am-12:05pm.....DU 229

Heroes & the Classical Epics with Dr. Edith Pennoyer (Penny) Livermore   
Lakeshore Campus Summer Session A
Tier 2 Literary Knowledge - Skills of Critical Thinking
CLST 272-002.....Class # 1595.....M-T-W-Th....8:30am-10:10am.....LSB 212

"Quae regio in terris nostris non plena laboris?" [What land on Earth is not filled with our Work? - Virgil, Aeneid 1.420]
A beloved verse from Virgil, embedded in mosaic in the vestibule of the Madonna De la Strada Chapel and appropriated, for the Jesuit Order, from its original context with regard to the laborious policies and projects of the expansion of Rome, could also be applied to the majesty and might of the exacting study of ancient Epic. For the Epic has indeed pervaded Western literary tradition in the footprints and the dreams of these enduringly human characters and events which have survived, and shall survive, as long as these songs and stories. The purpose of this Course, with its exacting study through ancillary scholarship, is to raise our consciousness of these enduring human values and of their relevance to the heroic, and even to the non-heroic, in our own quotidian lives -- the heroes, both song and unsung, the singers and the silent, whose labors have extended and survived throughout all corners of earth. Because, as Homer wrote in both the Iliad and the Odyssey, the events in Epic were all ordained by Zeus "in order that there might be a song for those yet to be born."

Classical Tragedy with Dr. Edith Pennoyer (Penny) Livermore   
Lakeshore Campus Summer Session A
Tier 2 Literary Knowledge - Skills of Critical Thinking
CLST 273-001.....Class # 1189.....M-T-W-Th....12:20pm-2:00pm.....IC 105


Fall 2014   

University Core Literary Foundations (Taught in Translation)    

Interpreting Literature with Dr. Greg Dobrov    
Literary Knowledge Tier 1 - Skills of Critical Thinking
UCLR 100-01C.....Class #3851.....M-W-F.....12:35pm-1:25pm.....MUND-504

Interpreting Literature with Dr. Lauren Schwartzman    
Literary Knowledge Tier 1 - Skills of Critical Thinking
UCLR 100-02C.....Class #3852.....M-W-F.....11:30am-12:20pm.....MUND-203

In this course, we will explore the human need to tell stories through three very different genres: ancient Greek tragedy, short fiction through the ages, and the twentieth century novel. We will also encounter ways of interpreting these diverse texts, from ancient theories to modern and post-modern views. Along the way we will continue to ask ourselves, "what is literature and why is it so important to humankind?"

Interpreting Literature with Dr. John Makowski    
Literary Knowledge Tier 1 - Skills of Critical Thinking
UCLR 100-03C.....Class #4888.....M-W-F.....2:45pm-3:35pm.....MUND-609

Readings from Greek and Roman literature; thematic focus on love (eros) and death (thanatos); genres of literature including novel, lyric love poetry, tragedy, epic, and philosophical writing.

Interpreting Literature with Dr. Edith Pennoyer (Penny) Livermore    
Literary Knowledge Tier 1 - Skills of Critical Thinking
UCLR 100-04C.....Class #4889.....T-Th.....8:30am-9:45am.....LSB-412

A Kaleidoscope of Writings from Antiquity!
A window into selected literature of the ancient Near East, Egypt, Israel, Homeric and Classical Greece, and Rome, with ancillary reflections on their attendant history and culture. While reading these works in translation, for the most part, we will attempt to ferret out the sheer beauty of the texts, both poetry and prose, and discern the common themes throughout this salient and enduring literature of the early Mediterranean and environs, still so relevant today.

Interpreting Literature with Dr. Edith Pennoyer (Penny) Livermore    
Literary Knowledge Tier 1 - Skills of Critical Thinking
UCLR 100-05C.....Class #5359.....T-Th.....11:30am-12:45pm.....MUND-508

A Kaleidoscope of Writings from Antiquity!
A window into selected literature of the ancient Near East, Egypt, Israel, Homeric and Classical Greece, and Rome, with ancillary reflections on their attendant history and culture. While reading these works in translation, for the most part, we will attempt to ferret out the sheer beauty of the texts, both poetry and prose, and discern the common themes throughout this salient and enduring literature of the early Mediterranean and environs, still so relevant today.

Interpreting Literature with Dr. Brian Lavelle    
Literary Knowledge Tier 1 - Skills of Critical Thinking
UCLR 100-06C.....Class #5360.....T-Th.....1:00pm-2:15pm.....MUND-603

Classical Studies (Taught in Translation)    

Art of the Roman World with Dr. Laura Gawlinski    
Artistic Knowledge - Skills of Critical Thinking
CLST 207-001.....Class #5361.....M-W-F.....1:40pm-2:30pm.....DU-228

This course explores the art of the Roman world chronologically, beginning with some of the earliest inhabitants of Italy and following the growth of the empire until the death of Constantine. We will examine different forms of art and architecture and how they were produced, including wall paintings, sculpture, jewelry, ceramics, and public and private buildings. In addition to recognizing technical and aesthetic qualities, we will also seek to understand the art in its context: its relationship to a particular moment in time, use as political propaganda and a representation of values, expression of status or gender, and interpretation by different audiences. We will always keep in mind that the Roman world was more than just the city of Rome by considering how Roman art was influenced by the Etruscans and Greeks and what art can reveal about what "Roman" meant at different places in the empire from Britain to the Near East.

Classical Mythology with Dr. Jonathan Mannering    
Literary Knowledge Tier 2 - Skills of Critical Thinking
CLST 271-001.....Class #5362.....M-W-F.....9:20am-10:10am.....DU-228

Classical Mythology with Dr. Edith Pennoyer (Penny) Livermore    
Literary Knowledge Tier 2 - Skills of Critical Thinking
CLST 271-002.....Class #1045.....M-W-F.....2:45pm-3:35pm.....DU-234

A Tapestry of Stories from ancient Greece and Rome!
This course will introduce us to the early stories of Creation, the myriad beings both divine and human there generated, and the stories attending them as imagined and fashioned by the ancient Greeks, in particular. Classes will be accompanied by visual illustrations, illustrative scenes from films, and an analysis of word roots in both Greek and Latin which foster a deeper understanding of the languages in which these song and stories first originated.

Classical Mythology with Instructor To Be Determined    
Literary Knowledge Tier 2 - Skills of Critical Thinking
CLST 271-003.....Class #1047.....T-Th.....10:00am-11:15am.....DU-230

Classical Mythology with Dr. James Keenan    
Literary Knowledge Tier 2 - Skills of Critical Thinking
CLST 271-004.....Class #3503.....T-Th.....1:00pm-2:15pm.....DU-234

Heroes and Classical Epics with Dr. Edith Pennoyer (Penny) Livermore    
Literary Knowledge Tier 2 - Skills of Critical Thinking
CLST 272-001.....Class #4603.....M-W-F.....11:30am-12:20pm.....DU-228

A dedicated and sacred journey into the world of the Trojan War heroes, both men and women, both during and after the conflicts, and the shining traditions which have lived on into our own times through Homer's Iliad, Homer's Odyssey, and Virgil's Aeneid in English translation. Beginning with an analysis of the oral tradition underlying the Greek epics, we shall journey line-by-line through these majestic works, unparalleled in beauty and import. And we shall pay special attention to specific vocabularies of the works, in the original Greek and Latin, which can aid our understanding of the liveliness of the works in their entirety, as well as their immense relevance to our own quotidian lives.

Heroes and Classical Epics with Dr. Brian Lavelle    
Literary Knowledge Tier 2 - Skills of Critical Thinking
CLST 272-002.....Class #4604.....T-Th.....10:00am-11:15am.....DU-228

This course focuses on the ancient Greek and Roman epic poems, the heroes and the "supporting" characters in them. The poems describe the journeys of heroes, sometimes spatial, frequently psychological, always emotional. These journeys involve obstacles and contrary forces which heroes must overcome. The heroes, their journeys and their struggles are metaphors for us and every human being, our journeys and our struggles. Students will read and consider the Iliad, the Odyssey and the Aeneidas literature, but also as important statements about humanity. The centering questions and topics students will confront are several. What is the nature of an "epic" and how and why does such literature come about? How do the components of epic impact an audience? What are the ingredients of a "hero" and what makes or unmakes him? What motivates an Achilles or an Odysseus? Who is the "supporting cast" and why is it important? What is the author actually trying to say to his audience? This course will be focused upon appreciating the epics on their own terms, but also upon how they capture the "universals" of shared human experience.

Heroes and Classical Epics with Dr. Kirk Shellko    
Literary Knowledge Tier 2 - Skills of Critical Thinking
CLST 272-002.....Class #4605.....W.....7:00pm-9:30pm.....CC-140

This course centers upon the Homeric Iliad and Odyssey and Vergil's Aeneidand endeavors to place these epic poems into their historical, social, and cultural contexts. Students will learn the definition of epic as a literary genre and discover how this genre evolved to reflect audiences and times. They will learn the components of epic language, in particular, literary devices and structural features (e.g., formulas, nested stories, epic similes). They will be able to describe the plots of the three epics and know the main- and mid-level human characters, gods, and goddesses. They will be able to define and better understand the meanings of "hero" and "heroism." Students will be able to express mature appreciation for the epics as whole works. Learning how the epics are variously interpreted as well as basic methods of literary criticism (e.g., analysis of language, content, structure, etc.), students will employ these as ways to understand and interpret the poems. As they read, learn and evaluate modern views of the epics, they will also acquire better means to distinguish critically between views and interpretations. A strong emphasis in this class will be upon the vital connections between past and present, and how students can become more aware of and understand important lasting concepts such as heroism, leadership, self-definition, etc. Finally, students will relate these stories to modern story-telling in order to understand how the heroes of the ancient Greeks live with us today. In short, they will interpret what epic poetry offered ancient listeners and what it has to teach modern readers. The classical tradition is rich with meaning and significance, even to modern 21st century adults, and this class will not only be an exploration of the culture and instruction of the ancient world through epic, but an investigation of what classic motifs remain with us today.

Classical Tragedy with Dr. Lauren Schwartzman    
Literary Knowledge Tier 2 - Skills of Critical Thinking
CLST 273-002.....Class #2218.....M-W-F.....2:45pm-3:35pm.....DU-228

In this course, we will read great tragedies by all three surviving dramatists, Aeschylus, Sophocles and Euripides. We will examine questions of performance, origins, the rituals of tragedy, dramatic theory and many other interesting topics in pursuit of the answer to the question, "why do we enjoy watching tragedy happen to someone else?"

Classical Tragedy with Dr. Kirk Shellko    
Literary Knowledge Tier 2 - Skills of Critical Thinking
CLST 273-003.....Class #2727.....T.....7:00pm-9:30pm.....CC-140

Classical Tragedy introduces students to the authors, social contexts and performances of ancient Greek drama. Students will learn how to interpret the "myth" presented on the ancient Greek stage and how to apply what they have learned to detect and interpret the moral, social and political issues raised in them. They will learn the names, works and careers of the principal tragedians, Aeschylus, Sophocles, and Euripides. Students will learn to assess the formal and aesthetic properties of the works of different tragedians. Emphasis will be given to specifics of performance and seeing a play in the "theater of the mind" as well as gaining command of relevant terminology, e.g., parodos, peripeteia, mimesis, catharsis, etc. Students will learn to outline the plot, argument and key themes of each work clearly and will gain an understanding of the historical context and social conditions motivating each work. The main themes of Greek tragedy (e.g., power, gender, justice, violence etc.) invite comparison to themes of contemporary theater and film. Students will acquire an awareness of ancient Greek tragedy in its connection with our own theatrical and literary culture, and they will reflect upon the influence of Greek drama on modern stage and literature. They will be able to employ several concepts in the analysis of Classical Tragedy.

Humanism of Antiquity I with Dr. James Keenan    
departmental major capstone
CLST 383-001.....Class #1060.....Th.....4:15pm-6:45pm.....LSB-412

Ancient Greek    

Ancient Greek I with Dr. Gregory Dobrov    
GREK 101-001.....Class #1992.....M-W-F.....1:40pm-2:30pm.....MUND-404

A student-centered and hands-on initiation into Ancient Greek. You will gain the basic vocabulary and skills to read the original texts of Homer, Herodotus, Plato, the New Testament, and Church Fathers. Our textbook "From Alpha to Omega" (Ann Groton, Focus) is user-friendly and accessible. Along the way, you will learn a great deal about language in general.

Introduction to New Testament with Dr. Gregory Dobrov    
meets with GREK 388
pre-requisite: GREK 102 or equivalent
GREK 267-002.....Class #5374.....F.....4:15pm-6:45pm.....CC-572

Readings in Greek Literature I with Dr. Gregory Dobrov    
meets with GREK 267 
pre-requisite: GREK 281 or equivalent
GREK 388-003.....Class #5373.....F.....4:15pm-6:45pm.....CC-572

Latin    

Latin I with Dr. John Makowski    
LATN 101-001.....Class #1991.....M-W-F.....10:25am-11:15am.....DU-229

This course begins fundamental grounding in Latin vocabulary, forms, syntax, and reading. You will become able to read great literature as it was originally composed, and also to transfer your skills and understanding to English and other languages.

Latin I with Fr. John Kilgallen, S.J.
this section is open to students of St. Joseph's Seminary only
LATN 101-K01.....Class #5960.....M-W-F.....11:30am-12:20pm.....MUND-205

Introduction to Roman Prose with Dr. John Makowski    
meets with LATN 286
pre-requisite: one year of college-level Latin or the equivalent 
LATN 271-001.....Class #4612.....M-W-F.....12:35pm-1:25pm.....IC-215

This class will complete the introduction of syntax needed to read Latin prose and complete the transition to connected reading of original texts. Grammar and analysis will continue to be emphasized so as to consolidate your understanding of how language functions systematically: this insight will strengthen your mastery of every language you use. At the same time, we will also begin to look at Latin prose texts as literature and sources of information - where even more fun begins.

The Age of Nero with Dr. John Makowski    
meets with LATN 271
pre-requisite: LATN 271/272 or equivalent
LATN 286-001.....Class #5384.....M-W-F.....12:35pm-1:25pm.....CC-572

Latin readings from Neronian Rome; selections from Petronius' Satyrika and from the works of Seneca; historical and cultural background.


Revised on 2 May 2014 by jlong1@luc.edu

Loyola

Department of Classical Studies · 1032 W. Sheridan Road, Chicago, IL 60660
Phone: 773.508.3650 · Fax: 773.508.2153 · E-mail: lhardison@luc.edu

Notice of Non-discriminatory Policy