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Loyola University Chicago

University Core

Core Knowledge Area: Historical Knowledge

Learning Outcome: Demonstrate historical understanding.

History is a form of inquiry and understanding that encompasses all aspects of the human experience and illuminates how the past causes the present and thus the future. Graduates should demonstrate understanding of the importance of chronology, sequential development, and geography; be able to evaluate historical evidence; understand the forces and processes of historical change and continuity; and have the capacity to handle diverse historical interpretations.

Competencies: By way of example, Loyola graduates should be able to:

Historical Knowledge Courses ( 2 courses required)

ANTH 107: Ancient Worlds
This course explores the cultures and civilizations that rose and fell in our distant past; its coverage is global in character and historical in content.

Outcome: Students will understand the varied geographical, historical, and cultural contexts in which ancient civilizations rose and fell.
CLST 274: The World of Archaic Greece
This course focuses on the history, as well as the literature, art, culture and society of Archaic Greece (c. 750-480 B.C.E.), the crucible of Classical Greece and (so) of western civilization.

Outcome: Students will be expected to master the chronology of the period, know its signature political, cultural and social events (e.g., the Olympic games, trade and colonization, introduction of science, etc.) and the significance of major historical figures of the age (e.g., Hesiod, Archilochos, Thales, Croesus, etc.).
CLST 275: The World of Classical Greece
This course focuses on the history, literature, art, culture and society of Classical Greece from c. 480 B.C.E. to c. 300 B.C.E., with a necessary focus on Athens.

Outcome: Students will be expected to master the chronology of the period, know its significant political, cultural, and societal events (e.g., Peloponnesian War) and the major figures and their significance for the period (e.g., Pericles, Aristophanes, Socrates).
CLST 276: The World of Classical Rome
This course focuses on the history, literature, art, culture and society of Rome from earliest times through the 2nd century CE.

Outcome: Students will be expected to master the chronology of the period, know its significant political, cultural, and societal events (e.g., Punic Wars) and the major figures and their significance for the period (e.g., Caesar, Vergil, Nero) and through which they will trace sequential developments in the systems and ideologies of Roman government (e.g., Senatorial authority, tensions between aristocracy and populism, etc.
CLST 277: The World of Late Antiquity
This course will investigate the historical development of the Roman Empire and adjacent lands in the 3rd to 5th centuries C.E., when the Mediterranean basin and Europe re-evaluated their Classical past and decisively set their course toward Medieval and later governmental, religious, and cultural history.

Outcome: Students will be expected to master the chronology of the period, know its significant, political, cultural, and societal events (crisis of the 3rd cent. CE., the triumph of Christianity, etc.), and the major figures and their significance (e.g., Julian, Augustine, Claudian, etc.). Through these they will trace the sequential developments in the systems and ideologies of the late antique world.
HIST 101: The Evolution of Western Ideas and Institutions to the 17th Century
This course is an introduction to history as a discipline, and an analysis of the origins, early development and structure of Western civilization from the ancient world to the 17th century.

Outcome: Students will be able to demonstrate historical understanding of the period and to conduct historical investigations.
HIST 102: The Evolution of Western Ideas and Institutions from the 17th Century
This course is an introduction to history as a discipline, and an analysis of the development and structure of Western civilization from the 17th century to the present day.

Outcome: Students will be able to demonstrate historical understanding of the period and to conduct historical investigations.
HIST 203: American Pluralism
This course is an introduction to history as a discipline, and an analysis of the origins, development and structure of the United States as a pluralistic and multiracial society from 1609 to the present.

Outcome: Students will be able to demonstrate historical understanding of the development of the United States as a pluralistic society and to conduct historical investigations.
HIST 204: Global Perspectives on History from 1500 to the Present
This course deals with the emergence of the modern world by describing and analyzing the encounters and interactions between and among various political entities, cultures, and societies that have over the last several centuries produced this world.

Outcome: Students will be able to demonstrate historical understanding of the development of the Modern World and to conduct historical investigations.
HIST 208: East Asia Since 1500
This course explores the roles and contributions of China, Japan, and Korea from the sixteenth century to the present tracing such themes as nationalism, capitalism, socialism, imperialism, war, peace, race, and gender struggles.

Outcome:  Students will demonstrate an ability to evaluate and explain the forces of historical continuity and change; understand the relationships among historical events, cultures and social forces; analyze and discuss the significance of primary and secondary sources.
HIST 209: Survey of Islamic History
This course consists of a survey of Islamic History from the emergence of the Islamic religious tradition in the 7th century until the contemporary period.

Outcome: Students will be able to demonstrate understanding of the historical events, cultures and social forces of Islam.
HIST 210: Introduction to Latin American History
This course explores the formation of modern Latin America by examining the region as global nexus where ideologies, cultures, peoples, and political entities have conjoined and clashed from the fifteenth century to the present.

Outcome:  Students students to Latin American history from the fifteenth century to the present in order to get an overview of the region in a global history setting.
HIST 211: United States to 1865
This course is an introduction to the history of the United States from the colonial era through the Civil War.

Outcome: Students will be able to demonstrate historical understanding of the growth and development of democratic government, the formation of a diverse society; the expansion of the national territory; and the crisis over slavery and secession.
HIST 212:  United States Since 1865
This course is an introduction to the history of the United States from the end of the Civil War to the present.

Outcome: Students will be able to demonstrate historical understanding of the growth and development of modern industrial society; the development of the general welfare state; the emergence of the United States as a world power; the debate over civil rights and civil liberties; and the evolution of the political culture of the United States.
HIST 213: Introduction to African History
This course surveys the History of Africa from dynastic Egypt to post-colonialism.  The primary focus of this course will be to examine the interactions African peoples had with non-Africans from the 15th century to the present. 

Outcome: Students will be able to demonstrate critical thinking and communication skills, as well as an understanding of  diversity in the world.

 

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