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Loyola University Chicago

University Core

Knowledge Area: Theological and Religious Knowledge

Learning Outcome: Demonstrate an understanding of theological and religious questions and traditions.

This area of study promotes critical thinking and informed reflection on theology and religion. Students ought to develop familiarity with the basic content of, and modes of scholarly inquiry into, selected theological and religious systems, including forms of religious ethics, and to develop productive intellectual attitudes to guide them in their search.

Competencies: By way of example, Loyola graduates should be able to:

Theological and Religious Studies Knowledge Courses

Foundational Course: Tier I (1 course required)

THEO 100: Introduction to Christian Theology
This course is an introduction to reflection on and analysis of the Christian theological tradition.

Outcome: Students will be able to demonstrate understanding of the tasks of Christian theology in its efforts to understand the human situation from the perspective of faith, various challenges to theology in the contemporary world, and will focus on one or more current theological issues.
THEO 107: Introduction to Religious Studies
The course explores religion as a significant part of human experience and introduces the student to the description and analysis of various forms of religion.

Outcome: Students will be able to analyze and interpret various ways in which religious traditions intersect with contemporary issues.
 

Tier II Courses: (1 course required)

Requirement for all Tier II Courses: THEO 100 or THEO 107 for students admitted to Loyola University for Fall 2012 or later.  No requirement for students admitted to Loyola prior to Fall 2012.

THEO 231: Old Testament
This course provides an introduction to the Old Testament / Tanakh (Hebrew Scriptures).

Outcome: Students will be able to demonstrate understanding of of central texts, beliefs, ethical understanding, and practices of Judaism and Christianity.
 THEO 232: New Testament
This course is an introduction to the historical and theological reading of the various documents of early Christianity known as the New Testament.

Outcome: Students will be able to demonstrate understanding of the various literary genres found in the New Testament and explain why the recognition of genre is essential to the interpretation of the New Testament, as well as the importance of how the New Testament documents have reached their present form.
THEO 265: The Sacraments
This course studies the realities of Christian faith life as expressed and celebrated in the concrete rituals of the Christian communities.

Outcome
: Students will be able to demonstrate how a sacramental system of aesthetics is often embedded in cultural artifacts such as poetry, music, painting, literature, and film, and recognize and interpret the impact of history and cultures on the development of Christian doctrine and practices.
THEO 266: The Church in the World
This course provides an introduction to ways in which the Christian churches, and primarily the Roman Catholic Church, understand and enact their identity in relation to the secular world of culture, economics, and politics, both nationally and globally.

Outcome: Students will be able to analyze and interpret contrasting Christian understandings of the notion of original sin, and demonstrate knowledge, with attention to historical development, of the central texts, beliefs, ethical understandings, and practices of at least one religious tradition.
THEO 267: Jesus Christ
This course examines the life of Jesus Christ, utilizing the Gospels, the writings of Paul and other biblical authors, the early ecumenical councils, and the history of church doctrine, including contemporary scholarship.

Outcome: Students will be able to demonstrate understanding of the nature of Jesus Christ as both human and divine, what this might mean, how this formulation was derived, and the varieties of understanding of Christ within the Scriptures, the church, and modern scholarship.
THEO 272: Introduction to Classical Judaism
This course provides an introduction to Classical Judaism.

Outcome: Students will be able to name and discuss some of the most important Jewish scriptures, articulate the general outline of the historical evolution of Classical Judaism, and define and discuss key concepts,terms, values, and religious practices foundational to Classical Judaism.
THEO 276: Black World Religions
This course explores the revelatory manner in which the divine comes to unique presence and expression among African peoples throughout human history. It will examine the religious experiences and traditions of: Africa's ancient Nile Valley civilizations, long recognized as cradling the world's spiritual and philosophical wisdom and as influencing the formative development of Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. 

Outcome:  Students will demonstrate their knowledge of African peoples' religious experiences within their various historical and cultural contexts.
THEO 278: Women and Religion
This course will study the role of women in at least one (if not more) of the major world religious traditions.

Outcome: Students will be able to demonstrate understanding of the influence of religion on gender roles, and how women in the contemporary world are reinterpreting their religious traditions.
THEO 279: Roman Catholicism
This course provides an introduction to Roman Catholicism.

Outcome: Students will be able to demonstrate understanding of the most important Roman Catholic beliefs, the historical evolution of Roman Catholicism, the key Roman Catholic concepts, terms, values, and religious practices, and the main lines of current Roman Catholic debates about its identity in today's world.
THEO 281: Christianity Through Time
The course is a survey course in the history of Christian thought. Not a course in Church history, this is a course whose primary goal is to investigate the major interactions between Christian thought and practice and the cultures that it has been a part of in its two thousand year history.

Outcome: Students will learn to analyze and interpret religious texts, beliefs and practices using standard scholarly methods and tools.
THEO 282: Introduction to Hinduism
This course provides an introduction to Hinduism.

Outcome: Students will be able to demonstrate understanding of the most important Hindu scriptures, the general outline of the historical evolution of Hinduism, the key Hindu concepts,terms, values, and religious practices, and the basic narratives and imagery associated with some of the most important Hindu deities.
THEO 293: Christian Marriage
This course examines the Christian understanding of marriage

Outcome: Students will be able to demonstrate understanding of ethical principles used to evaluate particular issues relevant to the understanding of the Christian tradition of marriage, such as, homologous in vitro fertilization, artificial birth control, indirect abortion (pregnant woman seeking treatment for cancer), etc.
THEO 295: Introduction to Islam
This course will provide an introduction to Islam.

Outcome: Students will be able to demonstrate understanding of the most important Muslim scriptures, the general outline of the historical evolution of Islam, the key Islamic concepts, terms, values, and religious practices, and the diversity within Islam in terms of sectarian, regional, and historical developments.
THEO 297: Introduction to Buddhism
This course provides an introduction to Buddhism.

Outcome: Students will be able to demonstrate understanding of the most important Buddhist scriptures, the general outline of the historical evolution of Buddhism, including its different major branches, and the key Buddhist concepts,terms, values, and religious practices.

Loyola

University Core Curriculum Committee · 1032 W. Sheridan Road · Chicago, IL 60660

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