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Loyola University Chicago

Department of English

Undergraduate Courses

100 Developmental Writing

English 100 is a basic writing course that provides instruction in fundamental composition skills to prepare the student for UCWR 110.  The course emphasizes mastery of grammar, usage, and punctuation.  Placement required.

Outcome:  Students will develop skill in:  writing with a clear audience and purpose in mind; developing a clearly stated thesis which acts as the governing idea of an essay; writing coherent paragraphs and well-organized longer essays using various invention strategies; using transitions to link ideas; exhibiting a working knowledge of basic grammar, usage, and punctuation conventions.


102 College Composition ESL 1

English 102 is the first of a two-course sequence designed to improve the linguistic abilities of those for whom English is a second language.  This course provides grammar and writing instruction for students who require more focused work in revising language usage and composing than English 103 can provide.  Placement required.

Outcome:  Students will develop skill in: writing essays that develop a clearly-stated governing idea and that provide relevant support for that idea; proceeding through all stages of the writing process: prewriting, drafting, and revising, with emphasis on improving language usage; editing their own compositions, and working with other students in peer-editing groups; consistently employing English-language grammar, usage, and punctuation.


103 College Composition ESL 2

English 103 is the second of two courses intended to improve the linguistic abilities of those for whom English is a second language.  English 103 stresses the acquisition of necessary language skills in the areas of grammar and usage, comprehension and critical reading, and writing at a level appropriate to university study in an English-speaking country.  Placement required.

Outcome:  students develop skill in: writing with a clear audience and purpose in mind; developing a clearly stated thesis which acts as the governing idea of an essay; writing coherent paragraphs and well-organized longer essays using various invention strategies; using transitions to link ideas; exhibiting a working knowledge of grammar, usage, and punctuation.


185 Creative Writing

A three-week intensive course in creative writing for students in the Pre-Collegiate Summer Scholars Program.

Outcome: Students will be able to demonstrate understanding of the creative and critical skills necessary for writing their own original fiction or poetry and for discussing, analyzing, and formulating arguments about it, and about their fellow students' work. Enrollment Requirement Group

Class restricted to Pre-Collegiate Summer Scholars.


206 Children's Literature


210 Business Writing

English 210 provides training and practice in various forms of writing (such as memos, instructions, letters, resumes, proposals, and reports) relevant to students who are considering careers in business.

Learning Outcome: Students will demonstrate familiarity with genres and styles of writing commonly used in business, with the stages of the writing process, and with individual and collaborative methods of composing.


 211 Writing for Pre-Law Students

Pre-requisite: successful completion of UCWR 110. Studies in argument and exposition from a lawyer's perspective for students considering the study of law.

Outcome: Students will gain an understanding of the principles involved in writing clear and effective prose for a variety of legal purposes, and be able to apply these principles to their own writing in the field.


270 Criticism and Theory 

This course explores a range of critical approaches and literary theories, including reader-response, new criticism, gender theory (including feminism and theories of masculinity), Marxism, new historicism and psychoanalysis.

Outcome: students will be able to describe, analyze, and formulate an argument about, literary productions using the critical and technical vocabulary.


271 Introduction to Poetry

The course will survey British and American poetry, especially from the Romantic movement on, especially of lyric kinds. Class discussion will generally focus on the form and sense of individual poems, and will in general be about poetic ways of meaning, and individual poets' understandings of what poetry is and what it is to do.

Outcome:  Students will be able to demonstrate an understanding of significant poems by selected British and American poets, demonstrate an understanding of basic critical terminology, and demonstrate an understanding of relevant critical perspectives on poetry.


272 Introduction to Drama 

This course focuses on the understanding, appreciation, and criticism of drama; extensive readings and several critical analyses are required.

Outcome: Students will be able to demonstrate understanding of drama's ability to express the deepest and most complex feelings and concerns of human beings as individuals, as family members, and as members of society: the individual's place in the universe, in relation to others, and in relation to the socio-political system that he or she inhabits. Students will also be able to demonstrate understanding of how plays are constructed in different ways to serve different purposes.


273 Introduction to Fiction

This course focuses on the understanding, appreciation, and criticism of prose fiction.

Outcome: Students will be able to demonstrate understanding of fiction as a means of exploring human experience and understanding the creative process, and be able to use the technical vocabulary necessary for understanding fiction.


274 Introduction to Shakespeare

This course focuses on the works of Shakespeare as literature and as theatre, covering at least three of the four genres (comedy, history, tragedy, romance).

Outcome: Students will be able to demonstrate understanding of the theatrical and poetic works of Shakespeare, such elements of drama as plot, character, theme, imagery, and verse forms, as well as the personal, political and theatrical world in which Shakespeare lived and worked.


277 Chief American Writers I, to 1865

This course focuses on the study of selected American writers from the earlier period; these may include Thoreau, Emerson, Melville, Douglass.

Outcome: Students will be able to demonstrate understanding of the history of literary production in America from its earlier times and how writers moved generally from non-fiction to fiction and poetry forms.


278 Chief American Writers II, 1865–Present

This course focuses on the study of fiction, poetry and drama produced in America from 1865 to the present.

Outcome: Students will be able to demonstrate understanding of the personal, cultural, and political experience of America's diverse population as it is reflected in the literature of the period.


279 Medieval Culture

The chief objective of this course is to introduce students to texts and ideas characteristic of medieval culture, with a special focus on works in English read in translation.

Outcome: Students will receive training in the understanding, appreciation, and criticism of works of medieval culture; extensive readings and several critical analyses are required.


280 Biography/Autobiography

This course studies literary depictions of individuals¿ lives; authors will vary each time the course is offered.  Possible sub-topics may include spiritual autobiography, slave narratives, or women's lives.

Outcome:  Students will be able to discuss the literary depictions of individuals¿ lives read in the course, and will acquire the critical vocabulary that will enable them to describe and analyze, and formulate arguments about, contemporary concepts of and approaches to identity.


282 African-American Literature

This course focuses on the development of the African American literary tradition from the emergence of the slave narrative to the contemporary present.

Outcome: Students will be able to discuss the significance of major African American literary movements and the contributions of representative writers from these periods.


283 Women in Literature

This course focuses on the representation of women in literature, as discussed in a variety of literary works.

Outcome: Students will be able to demonstrate understanding of the representations of women in various periods of literary history and diverse cultural contexts.


284 Introduction to Film History

This course is an introduction to the history and aesthetics of film.

Outcome: Students will be able to demonstrate understanding of the history of film and will be able to engage in close readings of films.


285 Introduction to Tragedy

This course introduces students to the genre of dramatic tragedy through the study of classical and contemporary plays and such playwrights as Marlowe, Shakespeare, O'Neill, and Miller.

Outcome:  Students will be able to recognize and discuss some of the elements that determine whether a play is or is not a tragedy, and will be able to describe the importance of genre to the interpretation of drama.


286 Introduction to Comedy

This course introduces students to literary works which may be defined as comedy:  that is, works that begin in difficulty but end happily, and works which produce laughter in their audiences.  Texts may include novels, poems, plays, and film.

Outcome:  Students will be able to recognize and discuss some of the elements that determine whether a work is or is not a comedy, and will be able to describe the importance of genre to the interpretation of comic works.


288 Nature in Literature

This course focuses on the relationship of human beings and the environment in which they function, as represented in a variety of literary works.

Outcome: students will be able to demonstrate understanding of the representations of "nature" in various periods of literary history and diverse cultural contexts.


289 Society in Literature

This variable topics course focuses on the relationship between literature and society. Each semester the course focuses on a particular social issue and a selection of literary texts that deal with the issue.

Outcome: Students will be able to recognize the ways literary form influences the meaning of literary representations of society, and to demonstrate understanding of texts representing society in various periods of history and diverse cultural contexts.


290 Human Values in Literature

This variable topics course focuses on a perennial psychological or philosophical problem facing the individual as exemplified in literary works, e.g., the passage from innocence to experience, the problem of death, and the idea of liberty.

Outcome: Students will be able to demonstrate understanding of the ability of literature to express the deepest and most abiding concerns of human beings, and how literary works come to be.


297 Survey of British Literature I

This course surveys the first eight hundred years of English literature through the reading of major works from the Anglo Saxon beginnings to Paradise Lost. Authors studied will vary, but may include the Beowulf poet (in translation), the Sir Gawain and the Green Knight poet, Chaucer, Spenser, Shakespeare, Webster, Jonson, Donne, Herbert, Marvell, and Milton.

Outcome:  Students will receive training in the understanding, appreciation, and criticism of works of Old English, medieval, and Renaissance cultures.


298 Survey of British Literature II

This course serves as an introduction to the study of British literature from the early 18th century to the present.  Authors studied will vary, depending on the instructor.

Outcome:  Students will receive training in the understanding, appreciation, and criticism of works of Restoration, eighteenth century, Romantic, Victorian, and modern cultures.


300 English Language: History

Study of the origin and development of English:  its sounds, word-forms, and syntax.

Outcome:  Students will demonstrate knowledge of the history of English and some understanding of linguistic theory.


302 Structure of American English

This course focuses on the study of American English, including modern grammars, theories of usage, and linguistic geography.

Outcome:  Students will be able to demonstrate knowledge of the unique characteristics of American English, and of the functions and effects of variations in American speech and writing.


303 Grammar: Principles and Pedagogy

This study of English grammar focuses on structural and transformational applications, such as identification, analysis, and generation of parts of speech, phrases, and clauses according to form and function. The goal of this course is to bring an innate process, language production, into the realm of conscious analysis. Required for students planning to teach high school English, but open to others. 

Outcome:  Students will demonstrate understanding of grammar and sentence structure sufficient to teach them.


306 Studies in Women Writers

This course investigates significant issues raised in and by women-authored works.   Readings may cover fiction, drama, and/or poetry from any literary period.

Outcome:  Students will gain knowledge about women's lives and writings; will understand the difference gender makes to the writing, reading, and interpretation of literature; and will acquire the critical vocabulary that will enable them to describe and analyze, and formulate arguments about, women-authored literature.


307 Feminism and Gender Topics


308 Biblical Literature

This course introduces students to the Hebrew Bible and New Testament with special attention to narrative modes, ethical problems, and sacred mysteries.  The course will include discussion of aspects of hermeneutics, and will focus on passages of the Bible that continue to shape contemporary cultures today. Depending on the instructor, the course may also include literature based on the Bible, such as Milton's Paradise Lost.

Outcome:  Students will be able to demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the Bible, one of the fundamental texts of Jewish, Christian, and Islamic cultures.


309 Irish Literature

This course focuses on the study of one or more topics in Irish literature as defined by the subtitle each time the course is offered.

Outcome:  Students will be able to engage in close readings of Irish literary texts and demonstrate understanding of the particular significance of Irish literature for literary studies.


310 Advanced Writing

This is a course in writing clear and effective prose in whatever form/genre is being studied; the subtitle will define the form/genre more precisely.

Outcome:  Students will gain an understanding of the principles involved in writing clear and effective prose in whatever form/genre is under study, and be able to apply these principles to their own writing in this form/genre.


311 U.S. Latino/a Literature

Students will study literature by U.S. Latino and Latina writers (esp. Mexican American, Puerto Rican, Dominican American, and Cuban American). Readings will highlight the variety of aesthetic styles and cultural points of view that characterize this rapidly growing field. Issues like language (bilingualism, translation, and code-switching), immigration, nationalism, transnationalism, and citizenship will be especially important.

Outcome: Students will develop analytical tools, culturally-specific terms, and critical questions to help them to interpret and to write about Latino/a literature.


312 Studies in World Lit in English

This course will introduce students to a range of critical and theoretical approaches to the study of world literatures in English.   Authors studied may include leading theorists like Frantz Fanon, Edward Said, Gayatri Spivak, Homi Bhabha, Paul Gilroy, and Arjun Appadurai; and literary writers like Chinua Achebe, Jean Rhys, Ngugi wa Thiongo, and Arundhati Roy. 

Outcome:  Students will be able to demonstrate understanding of the critical skills and theoretical insights necessary for discussing, analyzing and formulating arguments about world literatures in English.


313 Border Literatures

This course will survey a range of contemporary fiction that crosses national, cultural, social, political and personal borders. The study of border literatures will vary, and may include Hispanic-American writers, the Caribbean poet, Derek Walcott, and other literatures that move between disparate locations (England, India, Africa, Burma, etc.).

Outcome:  Students will be able to demonstrate familiarity with contemporary theoretical approaches, and to analyze texts that demonstrate how personal, cultural, and political identities develop in transnational contexts.


314 African Literature in English

This course focuses on the study of texts written by Anglophone African authors, along with works in translation in such genres as the novel, poetry, drama, autobiography, and film.

Outcome:  Students will be able to demonstrate understanding of the distinctive historical conditions that inform African literature, which may include concerns of gender, language, identity, colonialism, and education.


315 South Asian Literature in English

This course focuses on the study of literature written in English from South Asia and the South Asian diaspora. Authors studied may include Narayan, Naipaul, Desai, Sidhwa, and Rushdie.

Outcome:  Students will be able to demonstrate understanding of the personal, cultural, and political experiences of South Asia's diverse populations as they are reflected in the literature of the modern and contemporary period.


316 Caribbean Literature In English

This course will introduce students to the study of literature written in English from the Caribbean. Authors studied may include Lamming, Rhys, Walcott, Cliff, Lovelace, and Brathwaite.

Outcome: Students will be able to demonstrate understanding of the different genres of Caribbean literature, as well as the personal, political, and cultural contexts of the literature.


317 The Writing of Poetry

This course provides extensive practice in both the reading and the writing of poetry.

Outcome: Students will be able to demonstrate understanding of the critical skills necessary for discussing, analyzing and formulating arguments about poetry, and will produce a portfolio of original poems.


318 The Writing of Fiction

This course will discuss the techniques of fiction writing and will offer guidance in writing some works of original short fiction.

Outcome: Students will be able to demonstrate understanding of the critical skills necessary for discussing, analyzing and formulating arguments about fiction, and will produce original short stories.


320 English Literature: The Medieval Period

This course provides a survey of Old and Middle English Literature, studied partly in translation and partly in the original.

Outcome:  Students will receive training in the understanding, appreciation, and criticism of works of medieval culture.


321 Introduction to Anglo-Saxon

This course introduces students to the fundamentals of the Old English language (c. 600-1150), surveying poetry and prose in the original.

Outcome:  Students will be able to read Old English and to demonstrate a knowledge of literary works written during the Anglo-Saxon period.


322 Chaucer

This course introduces students to the life and writings of Chaucer through the reading of a representative selection (but not necessarily all) of The Canterbury Tales and through considering a variety of critical perspectives on them.

Outcome:  Students will be able to demonstrate knowledge of Chaucer's poetry, the ability to read Middle English, and familiarity with some critical perspectives on Chaucer's works.


323 Studies in Medieval Literature

Intensive study of specific topics in the field of Medieval literature and culture.

Outcome:  Students will be able to demonstrate an understanding of significant works of the Medieval period, of the historical political, social and intellectual backgrounds that provide a context for the works studied, and of relevant theoretical and critical perspectives.


325 British Literature: The Renaissance

This course is a study of selected literature of the Tudor, Stuart, and Cromwellian periods, excluding Shakespeare, by authors such as Sidney, Spenser, Lanyer, Donne, Wroth, and Milton.

Outcome:  Students will become familiar with:  the texts of significant authors of the period; how to read these texts in relation to the intellectual and social contexts in which they were produced; the literary genres, traditions, and conventions they employed and transformed.


326 Plays of Shakespeare

This course is an advanced study of selected plays as theatre and as literature.  Topics may include Shakespeare's life, sources, and influence; background of Early Modern literature and drama; Shakespeare's theatre; the tradition of Shakespeare criticism.

Outcome:  Students will be able to demonstrate understanding of, to analyze, and to defend interpretations of the plays of Shakespeare.


327 Studies in Shakespeare

Prerequisite: ENGL 274 or 326

Intensive reading of selected Shakespeare plays. 

Outcome:  Students will be able to demonstrate understanding of, to analyze, and to defend interpretations of a particular body of plays by Shakespeare, chosen by genre, theme, etc.


328 Studies in the Renaissance

The course will be a highly selective survey of late Renaissance literature, from John Donne and Ben Jonson to Andrew Marvell.

Outcome:  Students will be able to:  1) demonstrate an understanding of significant works by selected Renaissance authors; 2) demonstrate an understanding of historical, political, social, and intellectual backgrounds as they provide a context for the poems; 3) demonstrate an understanding of relevant theoretical and critical perspectives.


329 Milton

This course will cover Milton's early poetry, one or two of his prose works, and his late, major poems:  Paradise Lost, Paradise Regained, and Samson Agonistes.

Outcome:  Students will be able to:  1) demonstrate an understanding of Milton's major works, and a knowledge of his career; 2) demonstrate an understanding of social, political, and cultural backgrounds as they provide a context for Milton's poems; 3) demonstrate an understanding of relevant theoretical and critical perspectives.


330 British Literature: Restoration and Eighteenth Century

Study of literature between Dryden and Blake including such authors as Swift, Addison, Pope, Johnson, Defoe, Fielding, Wycherley, Sheridan, and Goldsmith.

Outcomes:  Students will demonstrate their ability to analyze and interpret a variety of works written by the authors studied; they will also show an awareness of the social, political, and historical contexts that inform an understanding of these works.


333 Restoration and Eighteenth Century Studies

This course will provide intensive consideration of selected Restoration and eighteenth-century texts.

Outcome:  Students will demonstrate their ability to analyze and interpret a variety of works studied in the course; they will also show an awareness of the social, political, and historical contexts that inform an understanding of these works.


335 Brit Literature: Romantic Period

This course focuses on the study of literature of the Romantic movement in its historical context; authors may include Blake, Wordsworth, Coleridge, Smith, Byron, P.B. Shelley, M.W. Shelley, Keats, Hemans, Hazlitt, and Austin. 

Outcome:  Students will be able to demonstrate knowledge of major works of the Romantic movement, and of its relationship to historical developments of the period.


338 Studies in the Romantic Period

Students will engage in intensive consideration of selected Romantic period texts.  The focus of the course will vary according to the instructor's choice of topic.

Outcome:  Students will be able to discuss and analyze the texts studied in this course, and to articulate diverse positions on the issues related to the course's central topic.


340 British Literature: Victorian Period

This course provides a survey of important works of prose, poetry, and fiction from the Victorian period (1832-1901).  Authors may include Tennyson, the Brownings, Arnold, the Brontës, Hopkins, Hardy, Newman, Dickens, Thackeray, and George Eliot.

Outcome:  Students will demonstrate their ability to analyze and interpret a variety of works studied in the course, and to articulate an awareness of the social, political, and historical contexts that inform an understanding of these works.


343 Victorian Period Studies

This course provides an opportunity for intensive consideration of selected Victorian texts that centers on a particular theme or genre or author.  The course will vary each time it is taught.

Outcome:  Students will be able to demonstrate knowledge of the subject of the course and an appreciation of that particular aspect of Victorian life, art, and thought.


344 Studies in Modernism

This course focuses on selected issues in current critical discussions of modernism. The issues may concern competing conceptions of modernism or a particular writer or group of writers associated with modernism.

Outcome: Students will be able to articulate diverse positions on the issues of the course.


345 British Literature: The 20th Century

This course focuses on selected examples of British poetry, fiction, drama, film, and non-fiction written in the 20th century. The principle of selection may be cultural, theoretical, or formal.

Outcome: Students will be able to demonstrate knowledge of assigned texts and will be able to explain the relationship among assigned texts in relation to the themes of the course.


348 Studies in British Literature: The 20th Century

This course focuses intensively on selected twentieth century British texts in relation to social and literary issues of the period. The selection may focus on cultural, theoretical, or formal issues.

Outcome: Students will be able to demonstrate detailed knowledge of particular texts and will be able to describe the relation of the assigned texts to a particular set of critical questions.


349 Irish Renaissance


351 Contemporary Literature

This course focuses on texts written from the end of World War II to the present.

Outcome: Students will be able to demonstrate understanding of recent major literary trends with special attention to the intersection of culture and technology with literary experimentation of genre and form.


354 Contemporary Critical Theory

This course, which is required of all English majors, introduces students to critical terminology and to issues in contemporary criticism and theory.  Readings may include critical works that have informed and established formalist, feminist, psychoanalytic, and Marxist approaches to literary analysis, as well as those associated with gender studies, cultural studies, postcolonialism, and deconstruction.

Outcome:  Students will be able to demonstrate knowledge and understanding of significant texts and theories relating to issues in contemporary criticism.


355 Studies in Literary Criticism

Intensive study of specific topics in the field of literary criticism and theory.

Outcome:  Students will be able to demonstrate an understanding of significant works in the designated field, and will be able to discuss relevant theoretical and critical perspectives.


356 Rhetorical Theory: History

This course is an historical survey of major trends and figures in rhetorical theory.  Rhetoric will be studied as a theory of the use of language to create responses in an audience, and as a theory of discourse alongside literary theory and philosophy.

Outcome:  Students will become familiar with:  major trends and figures in the history of rhetorical theory; areas of intersection between rhetorical theory and other kinds of discourse concerned with the nature and effect of language (and possibly other media), especially within philosophy and literary theory; selected theories concerning the social and political force of rhetoric.


357 Literature from a Writer's Perspective

This course examines literature from various periods in poetry and/or prose for technical innovation and genre development, with particular emphasis on applications to the creative process.

Outcome:  Students will gain a deeper understanding of the technical innovations and/or genre developments being studied, and will be able to apply these to their own creative works of fiction and/or poetry.


358 Cultural Theory

This course provides an introduction to the theory informing the field of Cultural Studies and to the history of theoretical writings about culture. 

Outcome: Students will be able to demonstrate knowledge and understanding of significant theoretical texts in the field of cultural studies.


359 High and Low Culture

Students will study the interactions between elite and popular culture, possibly focusing on a historical period or on a conceptual issue such as the framing of canons. Students will review and assess the assumptions and goals of those who create and critique works of culture. Students will also analyze the criteria by which specific works are judged. 

Outcome: Students will be able to describe, analyze, and formulate an argument about cultural productions, using appropriate critical and technical vocabulary.


360 Topics in Culture

This course offers intensive study of a selected topic concerned with the material analysis of "culture" such as electronic media, popular drama and performance, colonial culture, music or film. Students will analyze key (e.g. vanguard, exemplary, and contested) cultural artifacts. Students will also examine the criteria by which specific works are praised and critiqued.

Outcome: Students will receive training in the understanding, appreciation, and criticism of cultural productions. They will also be able to use the critical vocabulary necessary for understanding cultural artifacts.


361 Modern Poetry

This course is a study of poetry since 1880, focusing on poetic style and technique as well as on historical and cultural contexts.

Outcome: Students will be able to demonstrate knowledge and understanding of significant texts, techniques, and concepts in modern poetry, and to situate these in relation to important literary and historical contexts.


362 Studies in Poetry

Study of poetry centered on a theme, topic, genre, critical approach, author, or group of authors. Readings may cut across historical periods and geographical boundaries.

Outcome: Students will be able to demonstrate knowledge and understanding of poetic texts and of their interrelationships and contexts.


365 Drama: Medieval and Renaissance

This course focuses on the study of dramatic works from the Medieval and Renaissance periods in their historical contexts.

Outcome:  Students will be able to demonstrate understanding of the theatrical works of these periods, of the historical contexts in which the drama was written and produced, and of the major issues relating to theatre of the periods.


366 Drama: Restoration–20th Century

This course focuses on the study of dramatic works from later periods in their historical contexts.

Outcome:  Students will be able to demonstrate understanding of the chosen plays in their thematic, generic, or other chosen contexts; they will be able to analyze and defend interpretations of a variety of plays.


367 Modern Drama

This course includes extensive readings in dramatists since 1870, and the study of major world movements, experiments, and innovations.

Outcome:  Students will be able to recognize and define major modern dramaturgical techniques and to demonstrate understanding of, to analyze, and to defend interpretations of a variety of plays.


368 Studies in Drama

This course is a study of drama centered on a theme, topic, genre, critical approach, author, or group of authors.  Readings may cut across historical periods and geographical boundaries.

Outcome:  Students will be able to demonstrate understanding of the chosen plays in their thematic, generic, or other chosen context; they will be able to analyze and defend interpretations of a variety of plays.


369 Women in Drama

This course focuses on women as playwrights, actors, directors, spectators, and subjects of drama from the Early Modern period to the present.

Outcome:  Students will be able to demonstrate understanding of the ways in which women and issues important to women have been presented on the stage; they will be able to analyze and defend interpretations of a variety of plays.


371 The Modern Novel

This course covers prose fiction since 1880, and includes  global, social, political, moral, and economic influences on the novel.

Outcome:  Students will be able to demonstrate understanding of the critical skills and theoretical insights necessary for discussing, analyzing and formulating arguments about the novel in the modern world.


372 Studies in Fiction

This course is a study of fiction centered on a theme, topic, genre, critical approach, author, or group of authors.  Readings may cut across historical periods and geographical boundaries.

Outcome:  Students will be able to demonstrate an ability to employ descriptive and critical language appropriate to the discussion and analysis of fiction generally and, in particular, of the kind of fiction (e.g. theme, topic, genre, etc.) on which the course is centered. Students will be able to demonstrate an ability to articulate the formal and thematic continuities and discontinuities among these works.


375 American Literature to 1865

This course is a study of selected works of American Literature of this period against the background of historical events, political and social changes, moral and cultural traditions.  Authors may include Bradford, Bradstreet, Franklin, Poe, Hawthorne, Melville, Emerson, and Thoreau.  

Outcome:  Students will be able to demonstrate understanding of the distinctive historical conditions that inform American literature of this period, and will be able to identify and discuss some of its ideological and generic characteristics.


376 American Literature 1865–1914

This course is a study of the rise of American Literature of this period.  Authors may include Whitman, Dickinson, Twain, James, and Dreiser.

Outcome:  Students will be able to demonstrate understanding of the distinctive historical conditions that inform American literature of this period, and will be able to identify and discuss some of its ideological and generic characteristics.


377 American Literature 1914–1945

This course is a study of literature of early twentieth-century America.  Authors may include Cather, Eliot, Frost, Hemingway, Fitzgerald, Faulkner, O'Neill, Miller, and Williams.

Outcome:  Students will be able to demonstrate knowledge of the literature of this period in American history, and familiarity with critical perspectives on the works studied.


379 Studies in American Literature

This course focuses on texts written by American authors. This advanced seminar course varies in topic and may concentrate on a selection of works by a major American writer or a particular literary movement, period, or theme.

Outcome: students will be able to demonstrate an understanding of American literature and culture with focused attention to a major or distinctive feature of the American literary tradition.


381 Comparative American Literature

This course focuses on the study of U.S. literature and culture in relation to other literatures and cultures.

Outcome:  Students will demonstrate an ability to identify the formal and thematic features that, as literature, U.S. writing shares with the literature of other cultures. Students will also demonstrate an ability to specify the formal and thematic features that, as an expression of and response to cultural forces particular to the U.S., differentiate U.S. writing from that of other cultures.


382 Studies in American Culture

Intensive study of specific topics in the field of American culture.

Outcome:  Students will be able to demonstrate an understanding of significant works by selected American authors, of the historical political, social and intellectual backgrounds that provide a context for the works studied, and of relevant theoretical and critical perspectives


383 Theology & Literature


384 African-American Literature: Advanced Studies

This course focuses on texts written by African American authors. This advanced seminar course varies in topic and may concentrate on a selection of works by a major African American writer or a particular African American literary movement, period, or theme.

Outcome: students will be able to demonstrate an understanding of African American literature and culture with specialized attention to a major or distinctive feature of the African American literary tradition.


390 Advanced Seminar

Prerequisite:  junior standing

This course is required of all English majors.  It offers an advanced, intensive study of a period, author, genre, theme or critical issue in a seminar setting.  Topics are announced when the course is offered.

Outcome:  students will be able to recognize the ways that the subject matter of the seminar relates to the production, representation, and interpretation of artistic culture.


393 Teaching English to Adults

1 units min / 3 units max

This course offers training and practical experience in tutoring adults in written and spoken English in a volunteer literacy program at Loyola University.   Students examine literacy issues and write a research paper.

Outcome:  Students will be able to demonstrate understanding of societal and cultural factors affecting literacy, and will develop communication and critical thinking skills. Field Studies


394 Internship

Prerequisites: junior standing, six English courses.

This course provides on-the-job experience for majors in adapting their writing and analytical skills to the needs of such fields as publishing, editing, and public relations.

Outcome:  Students will be able to analyze their experience in terms of the skills they brought to their jobs, what they learned about the fields they worked in, and what new skills they developed as a result of their experiences. Field Studies


395 Honors Tutorial

Content will vary each time the course is offered, but in general will entail in-depth study of a literary genre or a major author or theme in literature.

Outcome:  Students will strengthen their capacity to analyze literature and to discuss it, both orally and in writing, and will be able to demonstrate understanding of the materials studied and of relevant theoretical and critical perspectives.


396 Teaching High School


397 Advanced Writing Workshop: Poetry

Prerequisite: ENGL 317.

Students will read master poets as models and will write and revise poems of their own, which will be discussed by the class in a workshop format.

Outcome:  Students will produce original poems, building upon skills honed in English 317.  They will also be able to demonstrate a deepening understanding of the critical skills necessary for analyzing and discussing original poetry, theirs and their fellow students¿.


398 Advanced Writing Workshop: Fiction

This course allows students to develop further their skills in writing and analyzing original fiction begun in English 318, in a supportive workshop atmosphere.

Outcome:  Students will produce original short stories, building upon skills honed in English 318.  They will also be able to demonstrate a deepening understanding of the critical skills necessary for analyzing and discussing original fiction, theirs and their fellow students¿.


399 Special Studies in Lit

Subject matter of this course will be designated by a subscript whenever the course is offered.  Usually taken as an independent study.

Outcome:  Students will be able to demonstrate understanding of the topic of the course, and of the research and critical skills necessary to analyze and discuss it.  Usually students will work independently and produce a research paper, under the direction of a faculty member.

Loyola

Department of English
Crown Center for the Humanities
1032 W. Sheridan Road
Chicago, IL 60660
773.508.2240

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