Loyola University Chicago

Emergency Response Plan

Influenza H1N1 (Swine Flu)

Past Communication - 04/28/09 - 1:24 p.m.

In response to the reported human cases of swine influenza in the United States, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) have recently issued a public health advisory.

To date, there are no known cases in Illinois. It is important, however, to take precautions in order to stay healthy and to do your part in keeping the community safe. Public health authorities recommend the following:

  • Cover your nose and mouth with a tissue when you cough or sneeze, and throw the tissue in the trash after you use it.
  • Wash your hands often with soap and water, especially after you cough or sneeze. Alcohol-based hand cleaners are also effective.
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose, or mouth, as germs spread more easily that way.
  • Avoid close contact with people who are sick. If you get sick, the CDC recommends you stay home from work or school and limit contact with others to keep from infecting them.

Symptoms of swine influenza are similar to seasonal influenza and include fever, cough, sore throat, body aches, headache, chills, and fatigue. Some people have also reported diarrhea and vomiting. Students experiencing flu-like symptoms should call the Wellness Center at 773.508.8883



 

Past Communication - 04/29/09 - 5:00 p.m.

The Chicago Department of Public Health has informed the University that a Loyola student has a probable, but unconfirmed, case of swine flu, and that it appears to be isolated at this time.

The student, a male, 20 years old, who lived on-campus in Fairfield Hall, has been home for several days and is doing well.

At this time, authorities have informed the University that it can continue to conduct business as usual.

As always, we encourage everyone to take precautions in order to stay healthy and to do your part to keep the community safe.

For more information and updates, visit the University's swine flu website at http://www.luc.edu/erp/h1n1.shtml.



Past Communication - 05/01/09 - 11:52 a.m.

The Chicago Department of Public Health has revised some of its guidelines for the Chicagoland area regarding the swine flu. Please keep in mind this is a rapidly evolving situation and is likely to change in the upcoming days, weeks, and months, as more information becomes available.

Loyola's Wellness Center is working closely with the Department of Public Health to determine next steps due to the revised guidelines. Please keep in mind that there continues to be only one probable case of swine flu in a Loyola student reported by the Department of Public Health, but it is reasonable to believe that there may be more, due to the fact that a probable case was identified on-campus. The Wellness Center, like most Chicago facilities, has seen an increase in suspected cases, with the majority of them being mild. We also continue to see the normal seasonal cases of regular flu, mono, and allergies.

Revised Department of Public Health guidelines include:

Mild Influenza-like Illness Recommendations:
At this time, the Chicago Department of Public Health strongly recommends that persons who develop Influenza-like Illness (fever with either cough or sore throat) stay home and remain there for seven days after the onset of illness, or at least 24 hours after symptoms have resolved, whichever is longer.

Mild Influenza-like Illness is defined as a fever (temperature of 100°F or greater) AND a cough, AND/OR a sore throat, in the absence of a KNOWN cause other than influenza (e.g., strep throat and mono).

At this time, the Chicago Department of Public Health:

  • Does not recommend influenza testing for persons with mild Influenza-like Illness.
  • Says antiviral treatment (Tamiflu and Relenza) is strongly recommended only for people ill with influenza who also have underlying conditions that increase the risk for more severe illness due to influenza (e.g., chronic pulmonary, cardiovascular, renal, hepatic, hematological or metabolic disorders, immunosuppression, compromised respiratory function, and conditions which increase the risk for aspiration, long-term aspirin therapy, pregnancy, age > 65 years, and age < 5 years).
  • Says treatment should only be started if within 48 hours of symptom onset.
  • Recommends influenza testing only for persons with severe Influenza-like Illness that meet the following clinical criteria: Severe Influenza-like Illness is defined as having a fever of 100.3ºF or greater AND difficulty breathing OR pneumonia AND having been a patient in the intensive care unit within the last seven days AND no known cause other than influenza.

It is important to take precautions in order to stay healthy, and to do your part to keep the community safe. Public health authorities recommend the following:

  • Cover your nose and mouth with a tissue when you cough or sneeze, and throw the tissue in the trash after you use it.
  • Wash your hands often with soap and water, especially after you cough or sneeze. Alcohol-based hand cleaners are also effective.
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose, or mouth, as germs spread more easily that way.
  • Avoid close contact with people who are sick. If you get sick, the CDC (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention) recommends you stay home from work or school and limit contact with others to keep from infecting them.

Symptoms of swine flu are similar to seasonal influenza and include fever, cough, sore throat, body aches, headache, chills, and fatigue. Some people have also reported diarrhea and vomiting. Students experiencing flu-like symptoms should call the Wellness Center at 773.508.8883, and faculty and staff members should contact your health-care provider.

For more information about the swine flu, visit http://www.cdc.gov/swineflu/general_info.htm or http://www.cdc.gov/h1n1flu/college-alert.htm.



Past Communication - 05/04/09 - 4:45 p.m.

There have been a few new suspected cases on campus as of Monday, May 4, 2009. The majority of the cases Loyola has seen have been mild, but we encourage the Loyola community to continue following the precautions we communicated in earlier messages. Please be sure to check the CDC Web page for more information and for further updates.



Past Communication - 5/13/09 - 4:58 p.m.

The Chicago Department of Public Health (CDPH) has informed the Wellness Center that the previously identified probable H1N1 flu case is now confirmed. We have also received notification from the CDPH that two other cases in Loyola students have been confirmed in the Chicago area. All cases are doing well. Please be aware that the number of confirmed cases may increase as delayed test results become available.

The Wellness Center continues to work closely with the Chicago Department of Public Health in monitoring the situation. Please do your part to help safeguard the health of the community.

If you think you have H1N1 flu:

  • Stay at home except to seek medical care. In order to help stop the spread of the virus, call your healthcare facility before seeking care unless it is an emergency.
  • Avoid close contact with others for 7 days after your symptoms begin or until you have been symptom-free for 24 hours, whichever is longer.

Health tips for everyone

  • Cover your mouth and nose with a tissue when you cough or sneeze.
  • Wash your hands often with soap and water or use an alcohol-based hand gel.
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose, or mouth.
  • Avoid contact with ill persons.



Past Communication - 06/11/09 - 5:11 p.m.

On June 11, 2009, the World Health Organization (WHO) signaled that a global pandemic of novel influenza A (H1N1) was underway by raising the worldwide pandemic alert level to Phase 6. This action was a reflection of the spread of the new H1N1 virus, not the severity of illness caused by the virus. At the time, more than 70 countries had reported cases of novel influenza A (H1N1) infection and there were ongoing community level outbreaks of novel H1N1 in multiple parts of the world.

 

Presumed Case of H1N1 Influenza (8/25)

Dear Loyola Community,

As expected, with the return and increased number of students on campus, we have identified one presumed case of the H1N1 influenza flu. Currently, it seems that the severity of the illness has NOT increased, but it is reasonable to expect to see more cases in the future. With this in mind, it is very important that you do the following to help stop the spread of this illness:

If you think you have the flu:

  • Stay home (and away from classes) and limit interaction with other people (called “self-isolation”), except to seek medical care. 

  • Do not return to campus or class for at least 24 hours after being fever-free (even when not using a fever-reducing medicine). Some people with influenza will not have a fever; therefore, absence of fever does not mean absence of infection. (For more information, visit http://www.cdc.gov/h1n1flu/guidance/exclusion.htm.) 

  • If possible, residential students with a flu-like illness who live relatively close to the campus should return to their home. Please do so in a manner that limits contact with others as much as possible. For example, travel by private car or taxi, as opposed to taking public transportation. 

  • Students with a private room, or those who cannot leave campus, should remain in their room and receive care and meals from a single person. Students can establish a “flu buddy scheme,” in which students pair up to care for each other if one or the other becomes ill. If close contact with others cannot be avoided, the ill student should wear a surgical mask during the periods of contact. 

  • Promptly seek medical attention if you have a medical condition that puts you at increased risk of severe illness from flu, you are concerned about your illness, or you develop severe symptoms, such as increased fever, shortness of breath, chest pain or pressure, or rapid breathing.

We encourage everyone to take precautions in order to stay healthy and to do your part in keeping the community safe. Public health authorities recommend the following:

  • Get a regular flu shot! 

  • Cover your nose and mouth with a tissue when you cough or sneeze, and throw the tissue in the trash after you use it. 

  • Frequently wash your hands with soap and water, especially after you cough or sneeze. Alcohol-based hand cleaners are also effective. 

  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose, or mouth, as germs spread more easily that way. 

  • Avoid close contact with people who are sick. If you get sick, the CDC recommends that you stay home from work or school and limit contact with others to keep from infecting them.

Symptoms of Novel Influenza A (H1N1) are similar to seasonal influenza and include fever, cough, sore throat, body aches, headache, chills, and fatigue. Some people have also reported diarrhea and vomiting. Students experiencing flu-like symptoms should call the Wellness Center at 773.508.8883. Faculty and staff members should contact their health care providers.

Get Updates Every Day
In addition to visiting LUC.edu/erp/h1n1.shtml, you can now receive ongoing updates, news, events, and health tips from the Wellness Center by following them on Twitter at www.twitter.com/LoyolaWellness or by reading their blog on igNation at blogs.luc.edu/wellnesscenter.

 

Sincerely,

Diane Asaro, MSN, RN, BC
Director, Wellness Center

 



Free Flu Shots and H1N1 Educational Sessions (Sent 10/1/09)

Loyola Community,

On Tuesday, October 6, and Friday, October 9, the University will hold free seasonal flu vaccine clinics for benefits-eligible faculty and staff members on the Water Tower and Lake Shore campuses. No appointment is necessary.

October 6
Water Tower Campus
8 a.m. to 4 p.m.
Terry Student Center, Rooms 303 & 304, 26 E. Pearson Street

October 9
Lake Shore Campus
8 a.m. to 4 p.m.
Regis Hall, 6340 N. Winthrop Avenue

Free seasonal flu shots will also be offered on each campus during the annual Health Days fairs on November 4 and 5. Please note that if you are pregnant, you will need a note from your primary care provider; shots will only be given to those in their second or third trimester. Please also be aware that the seasonal flu shot does not protect against H1N1 influenza. However, while this seasonal flu shot is not expected to provide H1N1 immunity, experts are encouraging individuals to get their seasonal flu shot earlier this year.

H1N1 Educational Sessions
Human Resources has invited Dr. Julie Morita and Lorraine Schoenstadt, MS, RN, BC, from the Chicago Department of Public Health Immunization, to provide free H1N1 virus educational sessions for faculty and staff members on Monday, October 5, and Tuesday, October 6.

October 5
Lake Shore Campus
Noon to 2:30 p.m.
Bremner Lounge, Centennial Forum Student Union

October 6
Water Tower Campus
11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m.
Beane Hall, 13th floor, Lewis Towers

Please attend one of these H1N1 sessions to learn more about the virus and how to maintain your well being. Looking ahead, the Health Maintenance Institute will come to campus to distribute the H1N1 vaccine to faculty and staff members, at no cost, once it receives approval from the Chicago Department of Public Health. When that vaccine becomes available, you will receive additional communication from Human Resources containing the dates, times, and locations of those vaccine clinics.

If you have any questions, please contact Human Resources at 312.915.6175.

Sincerely, 

Carolyn M. Wright
Director, Benefits and Compensation



Past Communications 10/21/09 to Students

Message from the Wellness Center
Second H1N1 Vaccination Clinic on Thursday

Loyola Students,

The Wellness Center has a small supply of its initial H1N1 influenza vaccine shipment left, and we will hold a student-only vaccine clinic tomorrow, Thursday, October 22, from noon to 2:30 p.m., in Bremner Lounge, CFSU.

Vaccines will be distributed to all Loyola students ages 24 and under. Students 25 and older are able to receive the vaccine as long as they fit into one of the first three high-risk groups listed below. All vaccines will be distributed on a first-come, first-served basis. There is no charge for the vaccine; however, a Loyola ID is required. 

High-Risk Groups:

1) Pregnant women have a high complication risk from the H1N1 virus and can potentially provide protection to a developing infant who cannot be vaccinated. They are therefore a high priority group. However, pregnant women must bring a note from their physician recommending that they be vaccinated against H1N1.

2) Those who live with or care for children younger than 6 months of age are a priority because younger infants have a higher complication risk from influenza and cannot be vaccinated.

3) Health care and emergency services workers (including Loyola nursing students in a clinical rotation and members of LUCEMS) with direct patient contact are a priority because they could potentially infect vulnerable patients. All forms needed by health care workers to verify vaccination must be brought to the clinic and will only be signed at that time.

4) Loyola students age 18 and younger, with chronic medical conditions, should be vaccinated because underlying conditions can increase the risk of complications from influenza. A Loyola student under 18 years of age must have parental consent to receive the vaccination.

Future H1N1 and regular seasonal flu vaccine updates will be sent by special broadcast e-mail if/when more vaccines are made available. We are committed to getting the vaccine to you as soon as possible after its arrival. Please note that H1N1 vaccines will only be distributed at designated flu clinics; please do not call the Wellness Center for H1N1 vaccine appointments, as center hours have been reserved for responding to sick patients.

We appreciate your patience throughout this process.

Sincerely,

Diane Asaro, MSN, RN, BC
Director, Wellness Center

 



Past Communication - 10/30/09

H1N1 Update

Dear Loyola Community,

Currently, Loyola is seeing a small increase in the number of H1N1 flu cases on campus, as are most institutions across the country. The cases we see continue to be mild to moderate in severity, and they are resolving as expected. With Halloween this weekend, the Wellness Center would like to remind you about the actions that each of you can take to decrease your chances of infection.

  • Cover your nose and mouth with a tissue when you cough or sneeze, and throw the tissue in the trash after you use it.
  • Frequently wash your hands with soap and water, especially after you cough or sneeze. Alcohol-based hand cleaners are also effective.
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose, or mouth, as germs spread more easily that way.
  • Avoid close contact with people who are sick. If you get sick, the CDC recommends that you stay home from work or school and limit contact with others to keep from infecting them.
  • Get a seasonal and H1N1 flu shot when it becomes available. If you haven’t been able to obtain one, focus on the tips above to decrease your chances of infection.
  • Do not share cups or bottles when drinking any types of liquid.

And, if you’re planning to celebrate Halloween, please keep in mind:

  • Drinking games, like beer pong, have been attributed by some to various cases of H1N1 among college students.
  • Alcohol does not kill the flu virus or prevent its spread from person to person.
  • Alcohol, tobacco, and other drugs can weaken your immune system, making your body more vulnerable to infections.

Do what you can to fight viruses like H1N1 and stay healthy; get regular sleep, eat nutritious foods, exercise, and avoid drinking too much alcohol and using other drugs.

If you think you have the flu:

  • Stay home (and away from classes) and limit interaction with other people (called "self-isolation"), except to seek medical care.
  • Do not return to campus or class for at least 24 hours after being fever-free (even when not using a fever-reducing medicine). Some people with influenza will not have a fever; therefore, absence of fever does not mean absence of infection. (For more information, visit cdc.gov/h1n1flu/guidance/exclusion.htm.)
  • If possible, residential students with a flu-like illness who live relatively close to the campus should return to their home. Please do so in a manner that limits contact with others as much as possible. For example, travel by private car or taxi, as opposed to taking public transportation.
  • Students with a private room, or those who cannot leave campus, should remain in their room and receive care and meals from a single person. Students can establish a "flu buddy scheme," in which students pair up to care for each other if one or the other becomes ill. If close contact with others cannot be avoided, the ill student should wear a surgical mask during the periods of contact.
  • Promptly seek medical attention if you have a medical condition that puts you at increased risk of severe illness from flu, you are concerned about your illness, or you develop severe symptoms, such as increased fever, shortness of breath, chest pain or pressure, or rapid breathing.

Symptoms of Novel Influenza A (H1N1) are similar to seasonal influenza and include fever, cough, sore throat, body aches, headache, chills, and fatigue. Some people have also reported diarrhea and vomiting. Students experiencing flu-like symptoms should call the Wellness Center at 773.508.8883. Faculty and staff members should contact their health care providers.

Get Updates Every Day
In addition to visiting this website, you can now receive ongoing updates, news, events, and health tips from the Wellness Center by following them on Twitter at www.twitter.com/LoyolaWellness or by reading their blog on igNation at https://webapps.luc.edu/ignation/.

Sincerely,

Diane Asaro, MSN, RN, BC
Director, Wellness Center



Past Communications 11/3/09 to Students

Message from the Wellness Center

Third H1N1 Vaccination Clinic on Tuesday, November 3

Loyola Students,

The Wellness Center will hold a student-only H1N1 vaccine clinic on Tuesday, November 3, from 10:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. in the Gentile Center. Vaccines will be distributed to Loyola students who fit into at least one of the high-risk groups listed below. All vaccines will be distributed on a first-come, first-served basis. There is no charge for the vaccine; however, a Loyola student ID is required. 

High-Risk Groups:

  • Pregnant women have a high complication risk from the H1N1 virus and can potentially provide protection to a developing infant who cannot be vaccinated. They are therefore a high priority group. However, pregnant women must bring a note from their physician recommending that they be vaccinated against H1N1.

  • Household contacts and caregivers of children younger than 6 months of age are a priority because younger infants have a higher complication risk from influenza and cannot be vaccinated.

  • Health care and emergency services workers who are students (including Loyola nursing students in a clinical rotation and members of LUCEMS) with direct patient contact are a priority because they could potentially infect vulnerable patients. All forms needed by health care workers to verify vaccination must be brought to the clinic and will only be signed at that time.

  • All students, 24 and younger, are a priority because many cases of 2009 H1N1 influenza have affected healthy young adults who often live, work, and study in close proximity. They are also a frequently mobile population. A Loyola student under 18 years of age must have parental consent to receive the vaccination.

  • Students, ages 25 through 64 with chronic medical conditions, should be vaccinated because underlying conditions can increase the risk of complications from influenza.

Moving forward, please take advantage of the H1N1 vaccine from other sources if it becomes available to you. While the Wellness Center expects to receive more H1N1 vaccine, we cannot be certain.

Future H1N1 and regular seasonal flu vaccine updates will be sent by special broadcast e-mail if/when more vaccines are made available. We are committed to getting the vaccine to you as soon as possible after its arrival. Please note that H1N1 vaccines will only be distributed at designated flu clinics; please do not call the Wellness Center for H1N1 vaccine appointments, as center hours have been reserved for responding to sick patients.

We appreciate your patience throughout this process.

Sincerely,

Diane Asaro, MSN, RN, BC
Director, Wellness Center

 



H1N1 Vaccine Update for Faculty and Staff

Update: 11.10.09

Loyola Community,

Human Resources is committed to providing the H1N1 vaccine to faculty and staff members; however, because we must follow the federal government's Centers for Disease Control and Prevention distribution guidelines, we are currently unable to provide an exact date when the vaccine will be made available to our employees. In the meantime, if you fit into a high-risk category (see www.cdc.gov), or have been exposed to H1N1, you should consider contacting your physician or the Chicago Department of Public Health to request information about how to receive the H1N1 vaccine.

When the H1N1 vaccine is made available to Loyola, another special broadcast e-mail message will be sent out and will include information about any on-campus vaccination clinics scheduled.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact Human Resources at 312.915.6175.

Sincerely,

Carolyn M. Wright
Director of Benefits and Compensation



Fourth H1N1 Vaccination Clinic on Thursday, November 12

Update: 11.11.09

Loyola Students,

The Wellness Center will hold a student-only H1N1 vaccine clinic on Thursday, November 12, from 9 a.m. to Noon in Bremner Lounge, CFSU. Vaccines will be distributed to Loyola students who fit into at least one of the high-risk groups listed below. All vaccines will be distributed on a first-come, first-served basis. There is no charge for the vaccine; however, a Loyola student ID is required.

High-Risk Groups:

  • Pregnant women have a high complication risk from the H1N1 virus and can potentially provide protection to a developing infant who cannot be vaccinated. They are therefore a high priority group. However, pregnant women must bring a note from their physician recommending that they be vaccinated against H1N1.

  • Household contacts and caregivers of children younger than 6 months of age are a priority because younger infants have a higher complication risk from influenza and cannot be vaccinated.

  • Health care and emergency services workers who are students (including Loyola nursing students in a clinical rotation and members of LUCEMS) with direct patient contact are a priority because they could potentially infect vulnerable patients. All forms needed by health care workers to verify vaccination must be brought to the clinic and will only be signed at that time.

  • All students, 24 and younger, are a priority because many cases of 2009 H1N1 influenza have affected healthy young adults who often live, work, and study in close proximity. They are also a frequently mobile population. A Loyola student under 18 years of age must have parental consent to receive the vaccination.

  • Students, ages 25 through 64 with chronic medical conditions, should be vaccinated because underlying conditions can increase the risk of complications from influenza. Moving forward, please take advantage of the H1N1 vaccine from other sources if it becomes available to you. While the Wellness Center expects to receive more H1N1 vaccine, we cannot be certain.

Future H1N1 and regular seasonal flu vaccine updates will be sent by special broadcast e-mail if/when more vaccines are made available. We are committed to getting the vaccine to you as soon as possible after its arrival. Please note that H1N1 vaccines will only be distributed at designated flu clinics; please do not call the Wellness Center for H1N1 vaccine appointments, as center hours have been reserved for responding to sick patients.

We appreciate your patience throughout this process.

Sincerely,
Diane Asaro, MSN, RN, BC
Director, Wellness Center 



H1N1 Updated FAQ (Sent on 11/17/09)

Message from the Wellness Center

H1N1 Updated FAQ

Loyola Students,

The number of new cases of H1N1 influenza in students has remained steady and students continue to recover well from the illness. That said, please be sure to take the proper precautions in order to stay healthy and take a moment to review the updated information posted on the FAQ page, which includes information on self isolation, self care, and how to handle missing classes.

Sincerely,

Diane Asaro, MSN, RN, BC
Director, Wellness Center