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Loyola University Chicago

First-Year Experience

Loyola Seminar

The Loyola Seminar courses (UNIV 102) are intended to provide Loyola University Chicago's first-year students with an academic experience that exposes them to active and collaborative learning in a supportive environment. Courses are taught by full-time faculty and other leaders on campus, including LUC President, Father Garanzini, and Associate Provost, Patrick Boyle. The one semester, one credit-hour, course meets weekly for 50 minutes with additional activities outside of scheduled class time to assist in community development and the integration of curricular and co-curricular learning.

Seminars are offered within several of Loyola's Major areas of study, exposing students to the discipline as a possible Major. Importantly, no background knowledge in the topic area is needed for students, as they are encouraged to explore new areas of interest.

Why take a Loyola Seminar?

Loyola Seminar Topics—Spring 2014

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The Architecture of Happiness

UNIV 102 Section: 001-LEC (2784)
Instructor: Michael Murphy
Theology

How does one talk about happiness?  What makes us happy? How do we “build” happiness in our lives and in our world?  What do the words “truth,” “goodness,” and “beauty” mean for us today and how is it always under construction in our lives? These questions will be threaded through weekly discussions and readings on architecture, art, literature and spirituality.

Narratives of Healing

UNIV 102 Section: 002-LEC (3138)
Instructor: Amy Kessel
English

We will be thinking and talking about stories related to healthcare. These stories will take many forms: autobiographical essays, short stories, poems, movies, and TV shows (e. g. Richard Selzer, Anton Chekov, William Carlos Williams, Clara Barton, Scrubs). We will also try our hand at writing our own such stories. 

Literature and Ecology

UNIV 102 Section: 003-LEC (4426)
Instructor: Frank Fennell
English

If this is the age of ecological consciousness, of hybrid cars, biodiesel fuels and LEED-certified buildings, where did this consciousness come from?  The answer— literature, broadly construed—will be the focus here:  through the ages fiction, drama, and poetry have shown us how we relate to the natural world.  More importantly, we will see how literature still speaks to the problems we face, still challenges us to rethink what we do and how we live.

Higher Education, Changing Careers, and Social Inequality

UNIV 102 Section: 004-LEC (3139)
Instructor: Dr. Judson Everett
Sociology

This course will offer a brief introduction to sociology by looking at something very familiar to you from a new perspective: your college experience and what kinds of careers await you after graduation. Every week, we will discuss current trends in higher education, the labor market, and social class inequality, and use various sociological theories to help us understand them. Moreover, we will discuss ways in which a sociological perspective can help you navigate your own college and professional careers.

Interrupting the School to Prison Pipeline

UNIV 102 Section: 005-LEC (3140)
Instructor: Robert Kelly
Division of Student Development

By using the Jesuit reflective practice of critical reflection for identity formation, students will explore the different factors that contribute to the “School- to- Prison Pipeline" as it affects youth in the K-12 system. Through readings, activities, and interactive discussions, this course will analyze and explore the concepts of individual, cultural, and institutionalized oppression within the School-to-Prison Pipeline framework. Students will apply their learning through their participation in the Alternative Break Immersion (ABI) for Women and Men of Color.  Upon returning, students will be able to connect how their ABI experiences impact their personal and educational values.

Myths About American Politics and Government: The Good, the Bad & the Ugly

UNIV 102 Section: 006-LEC (2785)
Instructor: Dr. Alan Gitelson
Political Science

In a relaxed, small-group setting, this class will focus on the myths that surround American government and politics and how our misperceptions have an impact on campaigns, elections and the governing process. This snap-shot of American politics will hopefully engage you and suggest that a life-time of being an informed and active political citizen is crucial to our lives. We will use the study of American politics as a means of developing an Ignatius approach to learning, an approach that values critical thinking, reflection, action and service to others. We will also examine your transition to college and specifically Loyola University.

Religion, Violence and Peacemaking

UNIV 102 Section: 007-LEC (2775)
Instructor: William French
Theology

This course will examine how religious appeals can be employed to promote justice and peace, but also aggression.  We will examine the psychology of aggression and see how in times of conflict we tend to employ tight “us” versus “them” understandings that often tend to justify violence and hatred.  By looking at the life and work Gandhi, Martin Luther King, Jr. and Archbishop Romero we will examine three cases of structural violence and oppression and three religious approaches for working for justice, human understanding, and peace.  

Introduction to Explore The Health Care Profession

UNIV 102 Section: 008-LEC (2776)
Instructor: James Johnson
Career Development Center / Pre-Health Professions Program

This class is an opportunity to explore and think more deeply about health professions. Our course materials, guest speakers, and on-site activities will offer a range of information on different health professions and opportunities to engage with various issues facing health care professionals today. You will also have an opportunity to reflect on your interests and aspirations, and examine a specific health profession in greather depth. *Restricted to the Wellness Learning Community.

Poetry in Chicago

UNIV 102 Section: 009-LEC (2787)
Instructor: Joyce Wexler
English 

Chicago has been a center of poetry since the early twentieth century, and it still is. In this course we will read and discuss poems about Chicago and/or by Chicagoans. We will also attend readings by contemporary poets on campus and at other venues in the city. 

Encountering the World’s Religions

UNIV 102 Section: 010-LEC (3650)
Instructor: Tracy Pintchman
Theology

What is Passover exactly?  Who was Muhammad?  Why are so many Hindus vegetarian?  In this course, we will explore distinctive elements of three of the world’s major religious traditions: Judaism, Islam, and Hinduism.  We will see movies about these religions, and we will visit the campus mosque and campus puja room to observe Muslim and Hindu forms of worship.  We will discuss the historical development of these traditions as well as forms of contemporary practice.  

Introduction to Explore The Health Care Profession

UNIV 102 Section: 012-LEC (4608)
Instructor: James Johnson
Career Development Center / Pre-Health Professions Program

This class is an opportunity to explore and think more deeply about health professions. Our course materials, guest speakers, and on-site activities will offer a range of information on different health professions and opportunities to engage with various issues facing health care professionals today. You will also have an opportunity to reflect on your interests and aspirations, and examine a specific health profession in greather depth.  

Service and Faith Seminar  

UNIV 102 Section: 013-LEC (4609)
Instructor: April Gutierrez
Campus Ministry

Loyola

The Office of First Year Experience · 255 Sullivan Center 1032 West Sheridan Road, Chicago IL 60660
Phone: 773.508.7381 · Website: www.luc.edu/firstyearexperience

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