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Loyola University Chicago

First-Year Experience

Loyola Seminar

The Loyola Seminar courses (UNIV 102) are intended to provide Loyola University Chicago's first-year students with an academic experience that exposes them to active and collaborative learning in a supportive environment. Courses are taught by full-time faculty and other leaders on campus, including LUC President, Father Garanzini, and Associate Provost, Patrick Boyle. The one semester, one credit-hour, course meets weekly for 50 minutes with additional activities outside of scheduled class time to assist in community development and the integration of curricular and co-curricular learning.

Seminars are offered within several of Loyola's Major areas of study, exposing students to the discipline as a possible Major. Importantly, no background knowledge in the topic area is needed for students, as they are encouraged to explore new areas of interest.

Why take a Loyola Seminar?

Loyola Seminar Topics—Spring 2015

001 Architecture of Happiness
TUESDAY 1:00PM, SULLIVAN CENTER
MICHAEL MURPHY
How does one talk about happiness? What makes us happy? How do we build happiness in our lives and in our world? What do the words ‘truth,’ ‘goodness,’ and ‘beauty’ mean for us today and how is it always under construction in our lives? These questions will be threaded through weekly discussions and readings on architecture, art, literature and spirituality.

002 Stories of Healthcare
WEDNESDAY 1:40PM, SULLIVAN CENTER
AMY KESSEL
We will read, discuss, view, and write about several narratives about the health care profession, told from the perspective of providers and patients. This course will be of interest to students who are considering a career in the healthcare field and also for those who enjoy a good story. These stories might be dramas, mysteries, or comedies. They could be told in a short story, an essay, a TV show, or even a poem. Three short response papers and active participation in lively discussions will be the basis of evaluation.

003 Reading Chicago
THURSDAY 1:45, SULLIVAN CENTER
VIRGINIA STRAIN
This course will explore the ways in which writings reflect and also shape a rich urban environment. We’healthcare spend time treating the city itself like a research project, compiling sources for information related to cultural events, as well as attending a number of (often free or cheap) literary events and tours. Through a selection of works in the form of critical essays, short fiction, film, theatre productions, poetry readings, and/or museum exhibitions, we will examine how diverse ethnicities and classes contribute to the rich linguistic texture of Chicago’s identity. Often introduced to established classics in the classroom, this course seeks instead to introduce students to contemporary literary experiments whose primary value rests in the quality of the experience and the event that they create.

004 Undocumented Youth in Chicago and Beyond
TUESDAY 4:15PM, SULLIVAN CENTER
RUTH GOMBERG-MUNOZ
This course will focus on the lives of undocumented youth who have largely grown up in the United States. We will look at causes and consequences of unauthorized migration and students will engage with the debate over immigration reform. Students will also participate in organizing an immigrant rights rally.

005 and 035 Social Justice Issues through a Mathematical Len
WEDNESDAY 11:30AM, SULLIVAN CENTER
LAURIE JORDAN

This course will look at issues of social justice such as wage equity, housing discrimination, use of natural resources, health care, etc. and analyze them using mathematics. Students will work in groups to prepare presentations associated with the issues that are chosen. Students will look at how issues can be investigated using mathematics.

006 Myths about American Politics
TUESDAY 1:00PM, SULLIVAN
ALAN GITELSON
An understanding of politics and government isn’t the only important component of our lives but, not surprisingly, our understanding of how politics and government interacts with our lives is essential. Americans have many misperceptions of politics and government. This class will distinguish between the myths and realities of American politics and government the truths and falsehoods that many of us have about the political system and process. This snap shot will hopefully engage you and suggest that being an informed and involved political citizen is crucial in our lives.

007 Religion, Violence, and Peacemaking
WEDNESDAY 11:30AM, SULLIVAN
WILLIAM FRENCH
This course will examine how religious appeals can be employed to promote justice and peace, but also aggression. We will examine the psychology of aggression and see how in times of conflict we tend to employ tight “us” versus “them” understandings that often tend to justify violence and hatred. By looking at the life and work Gandhi, Martin Luther King, Jr. and the Dalai Lama, we will examine three cases of structural violence and oppression and three religious approaches for working for justice, human understanding, and peace.

008 and 012 Intro Explore Healthcare Profession
WEDNESDAY 11:30AM OR 4:15PM, DUMBAUCH
JAMES JOHNSON
This class is an opportunity to explore and think more deeply about health professions. Our course materials, guest speakers, and on-site activities will offer a range of information on different health professions and opportunities to engage with various issues facing health care professionals today. You will also have an opportunity to reflect on your interests and aspirations, and examine a specific health profession in greater depth.

009 Higher Education, Careers, and Social Inequality
WEDNESDAY 10:25AM, DUMBACH 
Judson Everett
This course will introduce students to a sociological perspective on the institutions of higher education in which they find themselves. The course will also trace connections between higher education, the labor market, and various forms of social inequality.

010 Encountering World’s Religions
TUESDAY 11:30AM, CROWN CENTER
TRACY PINTCHMAN
What is Passover exactly? Who was Muhammad? Why are so many Hindus vegetarian? In this course, we will explore distinctive elements of three of the world’s major religious traditions: Judaism, Islam, and Hinduism. We will see movies about these religions, and we will visit the campus mosque and campus puja room to observe Muslim and Hindu forms of worship. We will discuss the historical development of these traditions as well as forms of contemporary practice.

013 Navigating Loyola
FRIDAY 1:40PM, SULLIVAN CENTER
MICHAEL MEINHARDT
This energetic and exciting weekly seminar is an orientation to the opportunities, transition expectations, and skill sets necessary to enjoy and maximize the undergraduate experience here at Loyola University Chicago. Designed to prepare entry into the professional or vocational world following graduation, this seminar contextualizes each student’s developing sense of purpose and direction as a student. Critical thinking, community-building, intellectual investment, and time management skills will be explored and individually developed to the end of not just better students, but better people. An array of academic disciplines will be examined through real-world immersion, including guest speakers, city activities, and both structured and unstructured group events.

015 Bones, Bodies, and Disease
TUESDAY 1:00PM, SULLIVAN CENTER
ANNE GRAUER
The human skeleton is a window into the past. By understanding how bones develop and change over time, as well as how they are influenced by events during and after our lives, we can begin to explore key questions; “Who was this person and how did he/she die?” and “Who are these people and how did they live?” In fact, we’healthcare find in this class that dead folks do tell tales.

016 Human Use of Animals
TUESDAY 2:30PM, SULLIVAN CENTER
PAM OSENKOWSKI
This course is designed to acquaint students with contemporary and historical issues in the science of animal use by humans. It will bring to light the many ways in which human beings use animals in science and education, highlighting their use in basic science and as models of human disease, among other topics. The class will also discuss scientific and ethical issues related to these topics.

017 Communicating in a Globalized World
MONDAY 11:30AM, CORBOY LAW CENTER
MARJORIE KURVAND
From the Pony Express to air mail to Twitter, the size of the world has shrunk as the speed of communication has escalated. But do the rapidity and accessibility of communication channels foster global understanding and acceptance, or just create more noise? For example, while news of revolutions now arrives at our fingertips, there’s also a numbing diet of pet videos and celebrity updates. We’healthcare learn about communication and globalization, and how the two influence each other. Knowing how to communicate effectively in an interconnected world is essential to raising awareness of public issues, building community and doing business globally.

018 Myth, Reason, and Belief: God and the Meaning of Life
TUESDAY 10:00AM, SULLIVAN
MARK MCINTOSH
Human beings have always struggled with a fundamental paradox: all that’s most meaningful, intensely beautiful, or important to our lives seems barely expressible in words – and yet there is nothing worthier of the mind’s attention. This brief introduction to theology investigates the insights of C. S. Lewis regarding the role of the imagination in understanding what’s most worth knowing. Exploring selections from some of Lewis’s favorite texts as well as his own thought, we consider the creative theological interplay of mythic narrative, rational understanding, and the dynamic outlook of belief in the human quest for the meaning of life. Readings will include selections from Homer, Plato, Ovid, Aquinas, Shakespeare, Tolkien, and Lewis.

019 Social Movements and Mass Media
WEDNESDAY 10:25AM, SULLIVAN CENTER
MARTIN PONTI
Through a series of case studies we will be examining the role of social movements and their relationconnection
to various media outlets, in their attempt to democratize and advance social, political, economic, and cultural rights. The course will focus on Latin America, particularly on Mexico, Brazil, Argentina, and Chile.

020 The Economics of Hunger in America
WEDNESDAY 2:45PM. SULLIVAN CENTER
DALE TAMPKE
This course explores hunger in America using the lens of economic analysis. Students will explore the current state of hunger in America, examine the factors in the economy that contribute to the current distribution of food resources, learn about how social choices impact the poor, and develop their ideas about root causes of hunger and possible solutions. A final project is required.

021 Think Differently: Lessons from the Innovators
TUESDAY 10:00AM, CORBOY LAW CENTER
RICHELLE ROGERS
This course will give students an inside look at how the most brilliant minds in technology think and how to apply their choices to everyday life.

022 Defining People’s Cultures
MONDAY 1:40PM, CROWN CENTER
ANNA CLARA IONTA
This course will engage first-year students in a lively, collaborative and stimulating “culture hunt”, collecting, analyzing and reflecting on what elements embody the concept of culture. Our case study will focus around the Italian culture as an example of historical, social, economic, artistic cluster of components that students will identify, connect, interpret and comment. The course also aims at fostering a progressive, on-going discussion of how a culture creates its own values and of how these elements in turn influence habits and attitudes of that culture, as well as of how other people perceive a culture different from their own, including stereotypes. The course is intended to teach students the basics of a study project involving observation skills, source consulting, data analysis and critical thinking. It will also give them a little exposure to some Italian language expressions and sayings. Finally, this class will definitely prepare perspective JFRC’s students, giving them an overview of Italian culture  and customs beforehand and making their future Rome experience more familiar and enjoyable.

023 Where’s the Next China?
TUESDAY 10:00AM, CORBOY LAW CENTER
JOHN CALTAGIRONE
Examines how business partners along the supply chain can work together to gain competitive advantage in moving products and services around the world to satisfy customers. The course will include viewing the options that U.S. corporations consider when looking at manufacturing in China and other regions of the world. Outcome: Understanding best practices: valued added processes; and information technologies throughout the global supply chain as well as considering global disruptions and how to mitigate the risk when selecting a region of the world to do business in.

024 Amazon and Wal-Mart
TUESDAY 11:30AM, CORBOY LAW CENTER
JOHN CALTAGIRONE
Examines the latest trends and strategies that companies like Amazon and Walmart are deploying to be your home delivery company. What are the plans to deliver groceries; electronics; apparel; etc. the next day or same day to you the consumer? What are companies working on and implementing around the world when it comes to the topic of sustainability? These are just some of the trends and challenges that will be analyzed and discussed.

025 The Chicago Commercial Style of Architecture and the Creation of the American Business District
WEDNESDAY 8:15AM, SULLIVAN CENTER
KENTON FOUTTY
Chicago was the first skyscraper city and important innovations allowed for the creation of central business districts. This course will assist in understanding the evolution of the business district and the role architects and technology played in the creation of central business districts. Our discussions and readings will culminate in an exploration of the Chicago business district.

026 Service and Faith Seminar
THURSDAY 4:15PM, DUMBACH
APRIL GUTIERREZ
You will explore the topics of service and faith as an individual and as a member of society, both on and off campus. You will use a variety of methods to enhance your understanding of what it means to look at service through the lens of faith. Class discussions, defining and learning “Why do I serve,” Whom do I serve,” and “How do I serve” using writings from various faith traditions as well as framing from Pedro Arrupe’s Men and Women for Others will help one observe one’s own personal desires on service

027 Deciding How to Lead
THURSDAY 10:00AM, CORBOY LAW CENTER
AMY KYHOS
Early on, we develop a leadership style. It regularly defines how (and how fast) we progress in our careers, regardless of profession. In “Deciding how to lead” students will learn to think about their leadership approach, how to cultivate their leadership style and work to understand how they’healthcare choose to operate in a professional setting. Key topics include leadership and work culture.

034 Encountering Chicago: Perspectives on Difference
THURSDAY 2:30PM, SULLIVAN CENTER
KATHLEEN DUNN
In this course we will discuss how cities operate as the primary sites in which we encounter social differences:through the design of space; the social construction of places; social interactions in public spaces;multiple cultures and publics; and political struggles to access the promise of urban life. We will read foundational theories of urbanism and select issues of importance to the contemporary urban experience.Students will conduct observations outside the classroom; special guests from Chicago’s political and cultural spheres will speak in class; and we will visit three Chicago neighborhoods to experience cultures and geographies of difference vibrating within the city.

037 Intro Explore Health Care Profession
WEDNESDAY 4:15PM,TBD
KEVIN KAUFMANNThis class is an opportunity to explore and think more deeply about health professions. Our course materials, guest speakers, and on-site activities will offer a range of information on different health professions and opportunities to engage with various issues facing health care professionals today. You will also have an opportunity to reflect on your interests and aspirations, and examine a specific health profession in greater depth.

039 Introduction to the Legal Profession
MONDAY 5:00PM, TBD
ELIZABETH ELLIS
This course is designed to introduce students to fundamental legal principles and systems in the United States and allow them to explore careers within the legal field. Students will be given the opportunity to study our federal and state constitutions, consider key legal questions of our society, and observe the judicial system in process. Further, students will be exposed to traditional and alternative careers which rely upon an education in law.

040 Creation Stories
THURSDAY 1:00PM, TBD
JEFFREY GLOVER
Where do we come from?  What explains the way things are?  Most human cultures have answered these questions with stories. Ranging from the Book of Genesis to contemporary theater, this course will consider the man creation stories of our religious, philosophical, and political traditions.  Studies will read a brief story for each class period, and come prepared to discuss it.

Loyola

The Office of First Year Experience · 255 Sullivan Center 1032 West Sheridan Road, Chicago IL 60660
Phone: 773.508.7381 · Website: www.luc.edu/firstyearexperience

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