Loyola University Chicago

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Loyola University Chicago

German Studies Minor

Courses

Required Courses

GERM 103 Intermediate German I

Students will gain a wider range of oral expression, both lexical and grammatical. They will be able to express more complex reactions, read more complex narrative texts, and write sentences in cohesive paragraphs and short essays. They will further understanding of German-speaking cultures.

GERM 104 Intermediate German II

This course is a continuation of GERM 103. Hence, students will continue to improve their linguistic and cultural proficiency skills as outlined above.

GERM 250 Conversations and Composition I

Students will gain confidence in their ability to speak, read and write modern German by acquiring a wider range of oral expression, both lexical and grammatical. They will learn to express opinions, both orally and in writing, in a German comprehensible to the native speaker. This will occur on the basis of comprehending and commenting on German cultural artifacts(e.g., texts, film, and music) that will provide an overview of the development of German-speaking cultural history.

GERM 251 Conversations and Composition II

Students will continue the process started in GERM 250 of gaining confidence in their ability to speak, read and write modern German on the basis of a wide variety of cultural artifacts from the German-speaking world.

GERM 300 German Studies Capstone

Students will synthesize the knowledge gained in their 18 hours of coursework into an interdisciplinary project and 10-15 page paper that combines that knowledge with the student’s other major(s)/minor(s) or other interests.

Elective Courses

CMUN 260 Film History: New German Cinema (offered every second or third year)

Students will examine the New German Cinema movement which takes place from the early 1960'sto the late 1970s. They will gain an understanding of the development and evolution of the New German Cinema movement within a cultural context.  The course is also designed to expand the student’s understanding of the critical/cultural theoretical approaches use in the analysis of cinematic texts.

HIST 290 Medieval Culture (offered every other year)

Students will understand how these cultures developed through shared roots, mutual influence, interaction and reaction; be able to interpret artistic expression and material culture in historical context; and gain skill in the analysis of primary sources.

HIST 300B Barbarians and the Fall of the Roman Empire (offered every other or third year)

Students will gain familiarity with the Germanic tribes (Barbarians) and their interactions with the Roman Empire; the ability to make connections between secondary and primary sources; and the capacity to think critically about the ways that historians have approached major issues.

HIST 300C Poland and Germany (offered every other or third year)

Students will gain familiarity with Poland and Germany in historical perspective; the ability to make connections between secondary and primary sources; and the capacity to think critically about the ways that historians have approached major issues.

HIST 300C: Topics in European History (post-1700)(offered every other or third year)

Students will gain familiarity with the topic; the ability to make connections between secondary and primary sources; and the capacity to think critically about the ways that historians have approached major issues.

HIST 311 Medieval World, 1100-1500 (offered every year)

Students will demonstrate understanding of new forms of schools and learning; the origins of national monarchies; the crusades; chivalry; courtly love and the role of women; the rise of towns; church and state relations; the Black Death and the Hundred Years War.

HIST 321 Germany in the Nineteenth Century,1815-1900 (offered every other year)

Students will gain familiarity with the Germany in the 19thcentury; the ability to make connections between secondary and primary sources; and the capacity to think critically about the ways that historians have approached major issues.

HIST 325 Europe in the 20th Century, 1900-1945(offered every other year)

Students will gain familiarity with the Europe in the 20th century; the ability to make connections between secondary and primary sources; and the capacity to think critically about the ways that historians have approached major issues.

HIST 326 The Second World War (offered every other or third year)

Students will understand the interrelationships among the political, social, economic, military and diplomatic developments of the war, its origins, and its results. Students will also come to understand the difficulties of decision-making and moral choices in a time of total war.

HIST 327 Contemporary Europe, 1945 to the Present(offered every other or third year)

Students will understand the process of European integration, including the effects of the Cold War on Europe, the challenges of the re-unification of Germany, the integration of ten Central European nations into the European Union, and cultural reactions to these developments.

HIST377 Nazi Revolution (offered every other or third year)

Students will explore the origins of Nazism and the reasons for Hitler’s success. Students appreciate the elements of Nazi culture, the nature of Nazi rule in the 1930s, Nazi foreign policy and aggression in the 1930s, and World War II.  They acquire a sense of the Nazi movement as a phenomenon growing out of unique German circumstances as well as one reflecting the larger context of modern western history.

PHIL 306 19th Century Philosophy

This course will enhance and clarify the students' understanding of (a) some major philosophers of the 19thcentury (e.g., Hegel, Marx, Nietzsche) and (b) the philosophical development after Kant from idealism to phenomenology.

PHIL 309 Classical Modern Philosophy

This course will enhance and clarify the students' understanding of (a) some major philosophers in early modern philosophy (e.g., Descartes, Hume, Kant) and (b) the major epistemological and metaphysical issues that are now associated with those influential philosophers.

PHIL 360 Contemporary European Philosophy

This course will enhance and clarify the students' understanding of (a) some major philosophers in contemporary German and French philosophy (e.g., Husserl, Merleau-Ponty, and Foucault) and (b) the major philosophical issues that are currently associated with those philosophers.

PHIL 375 Philosophy of Marxism

This course will enhance and clarify the students' understanding of (a) Karl Marx and his philosophical successors and (b) the major philosophical issues that provided for the longstanding influence of Marxist philosophy.

PLSC 308 Contemporary Political Thought (offered every other semester)

Students will read selected works from Friedrich Nietzsche, Max Weber, Reinhold Niebuhr, Hannah Arendt, Michel Foucault and Massimo Tale as a criticism of modernity. In the process, they will reflect on and come to understand these writers ‘concerns with the political, social, spiritual and psychological dispositions created by modern political institutions.

SOCL 205 Social Theory

Students will gain familiarity with the major classical theories in sociology for understanding the workings of society (Marx, Weber, Freud). Students will gain a critical perspective on the social organization of power and privilege. Students will be able to apply classical social theory to contemporary society and their own personal situation.

THEO 281 Christianity through Time (offered annually)

Main learning outcomes:

Knowledge of the contours of the Christian culture, primarily as synthesized by Augustine for the West: a non-dualistic, sacramental, incarnational culture of rightly ordered / wrongly ordered love of God in and through good creatures; knowledge of the process by which transalpine Europe (Ireland, France, England, German regions, Bohemia, Moravia/Bulgaria, Poland, Russia, Hungary, Scandinavia) was Christianized between 450 and 1150

Knowledge of both success and failure at establishing a Christian culture (including the interplay between “temporal” and “spiritual ”governance) in the central Middle Ages: the role of monks and monastic culture and the role of a Christian intellectual synthesis built on classical models in the emerging universities

Knowledge of the role of the German-Italian “Roman” Empire both reforming and fighting against the papacy from 900-1250; knowledge of the international character of theology, philosophy, and spirituality (that key figures like Bernard of Clair Vaux, Hugh of St. Victor, Albert the Great, Thomas Aquinas, Anselm where French, German, Italian hardly mattered in Latin-based medieval Christendom)

Knowledge of the process by which this inter-national Christendom with checks and balances between spiritual and temporal powers gave way  to the consolidated nation-state in geopolitical terms and to Enlightenment rationalism and historical relativism in intellectual and theological terms

Critical awareness of dominant Enlightenment and modern mythology about pre-modern Christian Europe: the Crusades, the role of women as counterintuitive examples; critical reflection on how a religion functions in the modern context that owes itself to historical events two millennia ago and relies on transmission of its claims via a chain of witnesses (saints, theologians). Critical awareness of variants in “internationalism”—ancient empires, religiously integrated inter-national culture, modern internationalism arising from centuries of nationalist competition; critical awareness of the complexities of transmitting and overturning traditions in medieval and early modern Christian Europe, with potential application to non-Western traditional cultures.

THEO 319 Reformation Theology (offered irregularly)

Main learning outcomes:

Knowledge of the main theological issues in the Protestant-Catholic disputes: role of bishops and learned scholarship in resolving disputes over Scripture interpretation, the Mass as propitiatory sacrifice, freedom/determinism, objective/subject efficacy of sacraments

Knowledge of the socio-political context: the consolidation of power in the emerging nation states (monarchies, city-states etc.), the emergence of a new phenomenon: state churches de jure in Protestant states, de facto in many Catholic states; establishing by 1650 the nationalist map of Europe (and European colonies) that will last three centuries

Knowledge of the continuity and discontinuity of both Catholic and Protestant Reformations with medieval, inter-national Christendom (special focus on German regions)

Knowledge of German opposition to “Roman” internationalism yet without a nation-state consolidation like that of England, France, or Spain resulting in the “checkerboard” map of German principalities that lasted until the 1800s

Basic knowledge of the “generations” of the Protestant movement: Luther and Anabaptists (first generation), Calvinists, the Church of England, Council of Trent (“second generation”)

Awareness of the complexities that challenge the simple equation of “Protestant Reformation” and “modernity” and “liberty”—reading this era of religious and political conflict through something other than Enlightenment or post-modern lenses; awareness of similarities (greater systemization in both theology and practice for both Catholics and Protestants) and differences (e.g., Catholics continued ancient cultic worship and Protestants innovated with proto-modern non-cultic worship)

Awareness of the ubiquity of interpretation (unmasking spin) both “back then” in the controversies and today in the interpretation of past controversies by those with vested interest in present-day controversies

Total number of credit hours required for the minor: 19.

Loyola

German Studies
Mailing Address: 1032 W. Sheridan Road, Chicago, IL 60660

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