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Loyola University Chicago

January Term

Course Descriptions

Listed below are the course descriptions for College of Arts and Sciences, Quinlan School of Business, School of Communication, and School of Social Work.

ACCT 201 Introductory Accounting I
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing

This course emphasizes the development and reporting of accounting information for use by investors, creditors, and others. The student is required to develop skills in the preparation and use of accounting information, must demonstrate an understanding of the accounting process, and be able to evaluate the impact of estimates, alternative accounting principles, and the limitations of the accounting model on accounting information. Topics include preparation and use of financial statements, the accounting process, and the measurement and reporting of income, assets, liabilities and owners' equity.

ACCT 202 Introductory Accounting II

This course highlights the differences between financial accounting and managerial accounting. The course begins by completing the study of transactions and events affecting financial statements. The cash flow statement is then explored in some detail. Finally, financial statement analysis as traditionally practiced, is considered a capstone for financial accounting. The course then focuses on the use of accounting data by management. Product costing in a manufacturing setting, assigning of costs to objects, learning how costs behave, and the use of accounting data by management in planning operations, controlling operations, and in short term decision making are all investigated.

Students will be able to understand the differences between cash and accrual accounting, the use of ratio analysis in investing and managing decisions, the value and importance of identifying and allocating costs, and the methods involved in the budgeting process.

ANTH 100 Globalization and Local Cultures

This course is a study of cultural diversity on a global scale, and provides a comparative perspective on the investigation of humans as cultural and social beings. Students will be able to demonstrate understanding of the historic and contemporary relationships between cultures and societies, and to understand how cultures change over time.

ANTH 102  Introduction to Cultural Anthropology  
(Satisfies Core Societal and Cultural Knowledge: Tier 2)

Requirement: ANTH 100, PLSC 102, PSYC 100 or SOCL 101 for students admitted to Loyola University for Fall 2012 or later. No requirement for students admitted to Loyola prior to Fall 2012 or those with a declared major or minor in the Department of Anthropology, Department of Criminal Justice, Department of Economics, Department of Psychology, Department of Political Science, the Department of Sociology, Human Services or the School of Nursing.

This course addresses how multiple factors (beliefs, rituals, social structure, economic structure, political structure) integrate to define culture in the broad sense and how and why they vary among individual cultures (societies). Students will be able to demonstrate the skills and knowledge necessary to investigate the importance of culture and its variation.

BIOL 111 General Biology Lab I
Co-requisite: BIOL 101

This course complements the lecture material through observation, experimentation, and when appropriate, dissection of representative organisms. Observations will include physical and chemical phenomena as well as the anatomy and physiology of selected organisms. The organisms to be studied will be selected from the kingdoms monera, protista, fungi, plantae, and animalia.

BIOL 380 Genetics of Evolution

Please check back for a description.

BIOL 395/ENVS 398 Special Topics in Biology: Topics in Winter Ecology

Our goal for Winter Ecology is to teach you about ecosystems in winter by immersing you in the winter environment.  These are the course objectives:

Winter Ecology is an intensive course that requires quick processing and learning of material. Students will be expected to work full time on the course. Students will not have time to take another J-term course or to work during that time.  Students will also also be expected to live at LUREC.

Class sessions (Mondays - Saturdays) will include lectures and discussions in the morning, often led by guest lecturers, field work in the afternoons, and evenings reflecting on the environment with a series of videos, journaling, and community bonfires to close the day.  You will choose individual projects to work on with partners – a particular site to observe and measure during the two-week period, and a small research project to work on during the second week.  Your grades will be based on projects, journaling, reporting on a primary research article, and class participation.  (There will be no tests.) You will earn three credits during the two week period.  Some class activities may be scheduled at night.  Some assignments will be due the week after J term.

For more information go to: http://www.luc.edu/januaryterm/campusinformation/lurec/

CHEM 111 Chemistry Lab A
Pre or co-requisite: CHEM 101

This laboratory course is designed to illustrate fundamental models and theories in chemistry with an emphasis on significant digits, calculations, and analysis and discussion questions. Students will be able to use equipment properly and demonstrate correct laboratory technique.

CHEM 225 Organic Chemistry Lab A
Co- or prerequisite: CHEM 223. Pre-req: CHEM 112

A laboratory course for non-chemistry majors designed to reinforce lecture topics from CHEM 223 and to expose students to the safe handling of organic chemicals. Students will acquire basic laboratory techniques and practices for working with organic chemicals.

CJC 322 Criminal Law

This course is an introduction to the principles underlying the definition, constitutionality, and application of criminal laws. It includes the analysis of court decisions regarding various state and federal crimes, and the rules of individual responsibility and accountability for those crimes. Students will be able to demonstrate an understanding of the constitutional limitations on the construction of statutory crimes, the elements of different crimes, and the principles governing individual responsibility and accountability for those crimes.

COMM 101 Public Speaking & Critical Thinking

This introductory course is designed to supply students with the skills of public address, a fundamental understanding of critical thinking practices, foundational tenets of communication theory, a grasp of the relationship between context and communication, and a sense of the social responsibility that comes with the capacity for communication.  Students gain skills in public speaking and an understanding of critical thinking.

COMP 125 Visual Information Processing
 (Satisfies Core Quantitative Knowledge)


This course, intended primarily for non-majors, provides an introduction to computer programming using a language well-suited to beginning programmers and practical applications, e.g., Visual Basic.Net. Understanding of computer mechanisms for representing and analyzing numerical and logical information and the power of programmability; practical ability to implement useful computing tools.

ECON 303 Intermediate Microeconomics

This course is a detailed study of consumer and firm behavior, market structures, and the elementary propositions concerning welfare economics. Students will develop analytical skills to understand and predict consumer and firm behavior, understand the underlying pinning of antitrust legislation and dynamic market strategies.

ENGL 273 Exploring Fiction (Writing Intensive)
(Satisfies Core Literary Knowledge and Experience: Tier 2)

Requirement: UCLR 100 for students admitted to Loyola University for Fall 2012 or later.  No requirement for students admitted to Loyola prior to Fall 2012 or those with a declared major or minor in the Department of English, Department of Classical Studies, or Department of Modern Languages and Literatures. This course focuses on the understanding, appreciation, and criticism of prose fiction. Students will be able to demonstrate understanding of fiction as a means of exploring human experience and understanding the creative process, and be able to use the technical vocabulary necessary for understanding fiction.

ENGL 282 African American Literature (Writing Intensive)
CORE Literary Knowledge and Experience/Tier 2 Literary Knowledge

Requirement: UCLR 100 for students admitted to Loyola University for Fall 2012 or later.  No requirement for students admitted to Loyola prior to Fall 2012 or those with a declared major or minor in the Department of English, Department of Classical Studies, or Department of Modern Languages and Literatures

This course focuses on the development of the African American literary tradition from the emergence of the slave narrative to the contemporary present. Students will be able to discuss the significance of major African American literary movements and the contributions of representative writers from these periods.

ENGL 290 Human Values in Literature (Writing Intensive)
(Satisfies Core Literary Knowledge: Tier 2)

Requirement: UCLR 100 for students admitted to Loyola University for Fall 2012 or later. No requirement for students admitted to Loyola prior to Fall 2012 or those with a declared major or minor in the Department of English, Department of Classical Studies, or Department of Modern Languages and Literatures.

This variable topics course focuses on a perennial psychological or philosophical problem facing the individual as exemplified in literary works, e.g., the passage from innocence to experience, the problem of death, and the idea of liberty. Students will be able to demonstrate understanding of the ability of literature to express the deepest and most abiding concerns of human beings, and how literary works come to be.

Class notes:

BIOL 395/ENVS 398  Special Topics in Biology: Natural History of Belize
Please review the course information on the Study Abroad website.

FINC 332 Business Finance
Prerequisites: Junior standing, ACCT 201, ECON 201, and ISOM 241

Principles underlying the financial management of a business; time value of money, securities valuation, capital budgeting, cost of capital, sources of funds, capital structure policy, cash management, and dividend policy. Please see a FINC 332 Business Finance Representative Syllabusus for additional information.

HIST 102 Evolution of Western Ideas and Institutions Since the 17 Century
(Satisfies Core Historical Knowledge: Foundational Course)

This course traces the development and of western civilization and its global impact from the seventeenth century to the present. Students will gain an understanding of history as a discipline, develop critical thinking skills based on historical knowledge about the key people, places, and events that shaped the modern world, and hone their communication skills.

HIST 203 American Pluralism
(Satisfies Core Historical Knowledge: Tier 2)

Requirement: HIST 101 or HIST 102 for students admitted to Loyola University for Fall 2012 or later. No requirement for students admitted to Loyola prior to Fall 2012 or those with a declared major or minor in History.

This course is an introduction to history as a discipline, and an analysis of the origins, development and structure of the United States as a pluralistic and multiracial society from 1609 to the present. Students will be able to demonstrate historical knowledge, draw links between the American experience and national identities, and to develop critical thinking and communication skills.

MARK 201 Principles of Marketing
This course develops an understanding of the marketing systems by which organizations plan, price, promote and distribute products and services to selected target markets. Students analyze market conditions and apply the basic tools to develop marketing strategies to successfully meet the customers' needs resulting in a viable, profitable organization.

MGMT 399/ENVS 398 Special Topics in Managment: Sustainable Business Management

Please cehck back for a description.

MUSC 101 Art of Listening
CORE Artistic Knowledge and Experience

Focus is on the acquisition and enhancement of listening skills through direct experience of musical works along with an examination of cross-cultural similarities and differences among musical styles. Concert attendance is required. A cultivation of musical perception through a process of repeated and guided listenings; strengthening of listening skills while developing and expanding styles perspectives.

OPMG 332 Operations Management

This course introduces concepts and methods for managing production and service operations.  Topics include demand forecasting, aggregate and capacity planning, inventory management, facility layout and location, just-in-time, managing quality, project planning, resource allocation, and logistics. Students will understand basic issues and the role of operations management in organizations, and learn of the tools for problem-solving in operations management.

PLSC 100 POLITICAL THEORY 
(Satisfies Core Philosophical Knowledge: Tier 2)

Political theorists are concerned with the way things ought to be. Their task is to identify the best policy option in any given case. In this introductory course we will survey the political ideas of a number of important modern thinkers. Their views are scattered across the political spectrum, from left to right. Our task will be to grasp the contribution each makes to the history of political thought and to critically assess their ideas. Please see the PLSC 100 Political Theory syllabus for information.

PLSC 102 International Relations in an Age of Globalization
(Satisfies Core Societal and Cultural Knowledge: Foundational Course)

This course is designed to introduce students to the major concepts and approaches in the study of international relations.  It seeks to treat the subject in an analytical and theoretical manner.  We will discuss different approaches used in study of the field, as well as the assumptions and consequences involved in the use of such approaches.  The course will rely on examples from different areas of the world and from different moments in history.  Although this is not a course on current events, in our discussions, we will also use examples of events that are still unfolding.  It is very important therefore to keep abreast of such international events from the media.  Some media sources can be accessed online (see, e.g., http://www.luc.edu/politicalscience/resources.shtml). 

Class notes:

PSYC 101 General Psychology

Psychology Requirement: ANTH 100, PLSC 102, PSYC 100 or SOCL 101 for students admitted to Loyola University for Fall 2012 or later.  No requirement for students admitted to Loyola prior to Fall 2012 or those with a declared major or minor in the Department of Anthropology, Department of Criminal Justice, Department of Economics, Department of Psychology, Department of  Political Science, the Department of  Sociology, Human Services or the School of Nursing.

Introduction to concepts, theories, and methods in psychology.  Emphasis is given to the scientific study of consciousness and human behavior. Topics include: human development, learning, thinking, perception, personality, testing, mental illness and mental health, biological and social aspects of behavior. Students will master basic concepts and key theories and learn to apply them to real-world situations.

SOCL 101 Society in a Global Age
(Satisfies Core Societal and Cultural Knowledge: Foundational Course)

This course fulfills the following requirements: Social & Cultural Knowledge Core Tier I; prepares students to take a Social & Cultural Knowledge Tier II course; counts as the first course in the sociology major. 

This is a foundational course in the social sciences which explores the effect of globalization on everyday life in the United States and elsewhere, using the basic perspectives and methodologies of sociology. The main purpose of this course section is to introduce students to sociological explanations of the world around us. This course will be divided into the following units. which capture the many of the concepts central to sociological understanding of a globalizing world: “Greed” – Social Stratification; “Violence” – Social Control, Deviance, and Ideology, and “Sex” – Gender Inequality and Socialization.  Students will cover these topics in a variety of ways, and discuss how all of these issues both extend beyond national borders as well as vary in different national contexts.  In so doing, I aim to show you the ways that sociologists think, and help you situate your own experience within ongoing processes of global change.  

Social Welfare Policies & Services I

Requirement: ANTH 100, PLSC 102, PSYC 100, or SOCL 101 for students admitted to Loyola University for Fall 2012 or later. No requirement for students admitted to Loyola prior to Fall 2012 or those with a declared major or minor in the Department of Anthropology, Department of Criminal Justice, Department of Economics, Department of Psychology, Department of Political Science, the Department of Sociology, Human Services, or the School of Nursing.
Prerequisite: sophomore standing.

Analysis of institutional structures of welfare as they relate to social problems. Selected major values and interests in American society are used to analyze the social welfare institution. Students will be able to describe and analyze current social welfare policies and social services within a historical, societal, and political context.

Class Notes:

SOWK 305 Human Behavior Social Environment I

Junior standing, SOWK 200; PSYC 101; NTSC 103 or equivalent; or permission of the department chair

This course studies the life cycle of the individual from in utereo through old age and death from a biopsychosocial perspective via multiple theorectical frameworks. Individual growth and development is studied in the context of culture, race, ethnicity, social class, gender, families and other social system as well as the impact of trauma, loss, and environmental stressors on the individual and family. Students will understand how social systems theory explains social functioning, the effects of systems of all sizes on human interaction, and how these apply to social work practice.

SOWK 602 Health Policy and Health Systems

Prerequisites: SOWK 507 and SOWK 509

Health-care systems are examined in the context of social policy and healthcare needs. The effects of different levels of healthcare interventions, changing roles and responsibilities of government, the voluntary sector and the proprietary sector are assessed in relation to access and utilization of health care.

THEO 100 Introduction to Christian Theology
(Satisfies Core Theological and Religious Studies Knowledge: Foundational Course)

This course surveys major topics in Christian theology using Alister McGrath's Theology: The Basics (3d ed.; Wiley-Blackwell, 2012) as a guide. Preliminary considerations will include defining "theology," surveying major periods in the history of Christian theology, and identifying major sources of theology (e.g., the Bible). Focus then shifts to a survey of topics following McGrath's outline of chapters, loosely based on the Apostles' Creed: Faith, God, Creation, Jesus, Salvation, Spirit, Trinity, Church, Sacraments, and Heaven. In connection with each topic, students will read relevant excerpts from the Bible and supplemental readings available through Sakai. Students will also consider these topics in connection with two works of literature: Augustine's Confessions and C.S. Lewis's Great Divorce. Consideration will also be given to contemporary debates regarding religion and science, in particular the question of human origins. In addition to lectures, this course will require significant student participation, including--but not limited to--discussions and student presentations.

THEO 107 Introduction to Religious Studies

This course is an introduction to the contemporary field of religious studies, focusing on both the theoretical investigations of religious traditions, as well as on the study of selected religious texts and practices (such as creation stories, sacred biographies, sacred scriptures of a religious tradition(s) rituals, ritual taboos, religiously motivated behaviors. Students will be able to analyze and interpret various ways in which religious traditions intersect with contemporary issues.

THEO 282  Introduction to Hinduism
(Satisfies Core Theological and Religious Studies Knowledge: Tier 2)

Requirement: THEO 100 or THEO 107 for students admitted to Loyola University for Fall 2012 or later.  No requirement for students admitted to Loyola prior to Fall 2012.

This course provides an introduction to Hinduism. Students will be able to demonstrate understanding of the most important Hindu scriptures, the general outline of the historical evolution of Hinduism, the key Hindu concepts, terms, values, and religious practices, and the basic narratives and imagery of Hinduism.

 

THTR 100 Introduction to the Theatre Experience 
(Satisfies Core Artistic Knowledge and Experience)

This course is an introductory study of the theatrical art form and its contemporary production practice. Students engage in a series of workshops and participatory creative projects. Students will demonstrate the ability to identify the variety of collaborating arts and artists that combine to create of a work of theatre; to analyze a play script for live performance; to evaluate theatrical production; and to creatively apply knowledge of theatrical process through expressive and creative endeavors.

Loyola

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