Loyola University Chicago

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Loyola University Chicago

Dan K. Webb Center for Advocacy

School of Law

Advanced Mediation Advocacy Practicum:

EEOC Mediation Advocacy Project I and II– Law 246

Students meet with clients and represent them on a limited basis at mediations at the EEOC with supervision/assistance from an experienced attorney.  Students must be 711 eligible and have a problem-solving course (mediation, negotiation, client counseling) or team experience, but do not need any previous employment law background.  Details are in the course catalog.  Please contact Professor Liz Simon with questions (esimon@adrsolutions3.com)

Advanced Mediation Advocacy:

Comments from Students 

In the past two years, students in the Advanced Mediation Advocacy class have worked with a range of clients and have advocated on behalf of those clients at EEOC mediations.  They have served as advocates in cases involving hospitals, schools and universities, manufacturing companies, and a variety of commercial and retail establishments. They have done an outstanding job. Here are some of their comments about the experience. 

“Through this experience I was able to really feel what it is like to be an advocate.  I was able to hear a story, meet a person, and provide guidance and direction on how to bring their issue to resolution. I admire these clients for being brave and taking a stand against what they perceive to be injustice.  It takes a lot of guts to do that. I am glad that I could offer a helping hand in the process. “ –CM

“This experience taught me more than I have learned in the previous 2.5 years of law school combined. Actually having the opportunity to work with clients, to go to the EEOC, to negotiate with opposing counsel and counsel our clients in person and over the phone was a truly enriching experience.” --KH

“The overall experience of working for a pro se client was rewarding. First, the experience of working with a client was new to me. At the law firm I clerk at, I do not interact directly with clients. Additionally, working with a pro se client, I felt more personal accountability.  When I clerked for the State’s Attorney’s Office, my client was “the state” or “the people.” I felt more responsibility handling [my pro se client’s] claim than other cases I have served as counsel for.” --M.M

“I think the multi-disciplinary weaving that must be done to be a successful and effective mediation advocate is far more complex and skill building than people realize. I learned a great deal about lawyering, mediation, negotiation and advocacy than I anticipated. “ --AE

“This was the first time I got to work with a real client and put all the theory that I had learnt in the classroom into practice. It was also extremely nerve racking to have the course of someone else’s life in your hands!” –SH

“[T]hese cases provided a tremendous lesson in learning how to have difficult conversations with a client, realistically framing expectations, discussing the high costs of litigation, and remaining supportive while at the same time honest.” –LS

Comments from Clients

“…your students… were great in giving me counsel… and superb in [helping me achieve] a very satisfying result… they represented me like they had been doing it for years...”

“I just wanted to … thank both you and _____ for your help on my discrimination/disability case … I greatly appreciated your compassion … and I could not have been happier with my representation during my mediation hearing.  …I was very impressed with [_____’s] professional demeanor; specifically her strong oratory skills … during the mediation and the above and beyond preparation she put into our meetings prior to the mediation itself. Words cannot express my gratitude toward her for pushing the issue during the negotiation phases of the mediation… I think _____ will make a fantastic attorney one day very soon…

… I'd like to also extend a sincere thank you to the entire Loyola Law Program. Great work is being done there and _____'s representation during yesterday's mediation is a prime example of that.”

Loyola

SCHOOL OF LAW
Philip H. Corboy Law Center · 25 E. Pearson Street · Chicago, IL 60611 · 312.915.7120

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