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Loyola University Chicago

Dan K. Webb Center for Advocacy

School of Law

Patient Safety and Medical Malpractice in an Era of Reform Conference

 

LOYOLA UNIVERSITY CHICAGO SCHOOL OF LAW

Dan K. Webb Center For Advocacy
 and
Beazley Institure for Health Law and Policy

Present

Patient Safety and Medical Malpractice in an Era of Reform

Friday, April 11, 2014

Philip H. Corboy Law Center
Power Rogers & Smith Ceremonial Courtroom
25 E. Pearson Street - 10th Floor
Chicago, IL 60611

Seating is limited and registration is appreciated. 

To register, please visit this link:
http://www.planetreg.com/E21912352730292

This program has been approved by the Illinois MCLE Board for 5.0 hours of general credit.

About the Conference

The implementation of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) provides a ripe opportunity for practitioners, advocates, and academics to examine the role and impact of medical malpractice litigation in light of the industry changes created by health care reform. Panelists will discuss such topics as how the ACA will impact patient safety, emerging avenues for enterprise liability in light of the ACA, and medical malpractice reform and alternative dispute resolution efforts. 

The conference format provides for panel presentations by experts followed by questions from the audience. Noted Prof. David Hyman, University of Illinois, will present his research from his recently published article: Let’s Make A Deal: Trading Malpractice Reform for Health Reform. 

Registration Information

Loyola University Chicago School of Law is pleased to present this important symposium at no charge for Loyola students and faculty as well as professionals and scholars not seeking CLE credit.  For those who wish to obtain credit, registration fees are $50, or $40 for alumni.  There is no charge for CLE credit for current School of Law faculty, staff, or students, and a 50% fee reduction is offered for attorneys working in the areas of government or public interest.

 Supplemental Materials

Panel Reading Materials

Panel #1 Will the Affordable Care Act Help to Advance Patient Safety?

Panel #2 Emerging Avenues for Enterprise and Other Liability in Light of the Goals of the Affordable Care Act

Panel #3 Creating Accountability through Medical Malpractice Reform and Alternative Dispute Resolution Efforts

Lunch Address

Luncheon Address: Let’s Make a Deal: Trading Medical Malpractice Reform for Health Reform

Conference Agenda
8:30 am -
8:45 am
Registration/Continental Breakfast
8:45 am -
9:00 am
Opening Remarks
  • Zelda Harris, Loyola University Chicago School of Law
  • Lawrence E. Singer, Loyola University Chicago School of Law
9:00 am -
10:15 am

Panel #1 Will the Affordable Care Act Help to Advance Patient Safety?

  • Ann Scott Blouin, PhD, RN, The Joint Commission
  • Catherine Johnson, Rush University Medical Center
  • Alicia Cole, Patient Safety Advocate
  • Zelda Harris, Loyola University Chicago School of Law (moderator)
10:15am-
10:30 am
 Break
10:30am-
11:45 pm

Panel #2 Emerging Avenues for Enterprise and Other Liability in Light of the Goals of the Affordable Care Act

  • Leonard Nelson, JD, American Medical Association
  • Patricia Bobb, JD, Patricia C. Bobb & Associates, Meyers & Flowers
  • Carmel Cosgrave, JD, Health Care Practice Group, SmithAmundsen
  • John Blum, John J. Waldron Research Professor, Loyola University Chicago School of Law (moderator)
11:45am-
1:00 pm

Luncheon Address: Let’s Make a Deal: Trading Medical Malpractice Reform for Health Reform

  • Prof. David Hyman, MD, JD, University of Illinois
1:00 pm–
1:15 pm
Break
1:15 pm -
2:45 pm

Panel #3 Creating Accountability through Medical Malpractice Reform and Alternative Dispute Resolution Efforts

  • Richard Boothman, JD, University of Michigan Medical School
  • Gerald Hickson, MD, Vanderbilt University Medical Center
  • Barbara Youngberg, Loyola University Chicago School of Law (moderator)
2:45 pm–
3:00 pm

Closing Remarks

  • Zelda Harris, Loyola University Chicago School of Law

 

Opening Remarks

 ZELDA HARRIS is a Clinical Professor of Law and Director of the Dan K. Webb Center for Advocacy at Loyola University Chicago School of law.  Professor Harris has extensive experience as a litigator and advocate on behalf of victims of family violence.  Professor Harris is a member of the National Institute for Trial Advocacy (NITA) faculty, which provides advocacy training and leadership to young attorneys nationally and internationally. As Director of the Center, Prof. Harris leads the law school curriculum on trial, appellate and dispute resolution advocacy. She received her B.S. degree from Syracuse University and her J.D. from Washington University.

 LARRY SINGER is the Director of Beazley Institute for Health Law and Policy at Loyola University Chicago School of Law. He is also the Associate Dean of Distance Learning and an Associate Professor at Loyola. Professor Singer was previously focused on general corporate and transactional matters, medical staff affairs, and patient care issues as a partner at McDermott, Will & Emery. He also served as assistant to the general counsel of the American Hospital Association and as legal counsel in the America Hospital Association's Office of Legal and Regulatory Affairs.  Professor Singer received his Bachelor Degree, Master Degree, and Juris Doctor from the University of Michigan.

 

 Panel #1: Will the Affordable Care Act Help to Advance Patient Safety? 

 ANN SCOTT BLOUIN, RN, PhD, FACHE, is the Executive Vice President of Customer Relations at The Joint Commission where she focuses on building external customer and stakeholder relationships, primarily in the hospital and health system market, and gathers customer ideas and feedback, assisting in guiding business development and customer retention strategies.  Dr. Blouin has worked with multiple health systems across the United States to help them improve quality and patient safety, revenue management, and operating cost efficiency and effectiveness.  She earned her PhD in Nursing Sciences and MBA from the University of Illinois at Chicago.  She received her MSN with honors in Maternal/Child Nursing from Loyola University Chicago, and BSN with high honors from Lewis University in Romeoville, Illinois. 

 CATHERINE JOHNSON, MS, is currently the Manager of Patient Relations at Rush University Medical Center where she oversees the complaint and grievance process. Her primary focus is to ensure that the patient voice is considered in the development of safety and quality initiatives. Ms. Johnson has more than eighteen years of experience in healthcare administration working at hospitals in New York, Kuwait and Chicago. Her focus has been on operational efficiencies that result in the delivery of “person” centered care including reducing wait time; instituting prescriber order entry; and enhancing patient advocacy programs. Ms. Johnson has a BS in Business Management and Economics – Healthcare from the State University of New York and an MS in Patient Safety Leadership from the University of Illinois.

 ALICIA COLE is a Patient Safety Advocate who works with the Department of Health & Human Services, the CDC, Partnership for Patients and the National Quality Forum, among others.  In August 2006, following routine surgery to remove two small fibroids, Ms. Cole’s condition deteriorated, and she found herself back in surgery six more times over the next three weeks.  After leaving the hospital two months later, Ms. Cole endured five months of daily hyperbaric oxygen chamber treatments, home health care dressing changes for over a year, and nearly three years of intensive wound care.  Following her experiences, Ms. Cole coordinated a determined campaign calling for an inspection of her hospital resulting in the facility being cited for violations of ten federal laws and five state rules.  She also co-sponsored and successfully lobbied for passage of two new state laws for patient safety and public reporting of hospital infection rates.

 

Panel #2: Emerging Avenues for Enterprise and Other Liability in Light of the Goals of the Affordable Care Act

 JOHN BLUM is the John J. Waldron Research Professor at Loyola University Chicago School of Law.  Prior to coming to Loyola, Professor Blum held positions on the faculties of Penn State and Boston University, and was a teaching fellow at the Harvard School of Public Health. In the spring of 1993 he was a visiting professor at Osgoode Hall and the University of British Columbia Faculties of Law under the auspices of the U.S.-Canada Fulbright program. He has served as a consultant to USAID in Indonesia where he worked on the development of a curriculum in public health law for use in schools of public health. He has many years of experience in health law and policy, and is very active in research in these areas, with a particular focus on legal issues in medical quality assurance. Prof. Blum received his B.A. degree from Canisius College, his J.D. degree from the University of Notre Dame, and his M.H.S. from Harvard School of Public Health.

 PATRICIA BOBB, JD, is principal of the law firm of Patricia C. Bobb & Associates, and Of Counsel to the law firm of Meyers & Flowers.  Her litigation practice focuses on representing individuals in personal injury cases with an emphasis on medical malpractice. She has extensive jury trial and bench trial experience in federal and state courts and has acted as a mediator in major medical malpractice cases. Patricia Bobb has also been actively involved in many professional organizations including serving as past President of the 22,000 member Chicago Bar Association,   past Chair of the Board of Trustees for the National Institute for Trial Advocacy and as a member of the Board of Governors of the Illinois State Bar Association. Patricia Bobb received her undergraduate degree from New Mexico State University and her law degree from University of Notre Dame. Ms. Bobb is consistently ranked as the #1 Leading Woman Lawyer in Illinois by the Leading Lawyers Network.

 CARMEL COSGRAVE, JD, is a founding partner of SmithAmundsen and chairperson of the Health Care Practice Group. Carmel Cosgrave is an accomplished trial attorney, handling cases in both state and federal courts. She concentrates her practice in the health care field, but her practice also includes defending corporations in a variety of complex litigation matters. She represents health care systems, long term care operators, assisted living facilities, and medical device manufacturers in litigation and other matters. In addition to her practice, Carmel Cosgrave served as president and former president of the Chicago Hospital Risk Managers Society (CHRMS). Ms. Cosgrave received her B.S. degree from Roosevelt University and her J.D. degree with honors from Loyola University Chicago School of Law.

 LEONARD NELSON, JD, is Senior Division Counsel at the American Medical Association where his principal duty is to serve as the Director of the Litigation Center of the American Medical Association and the State Medical Societies.  As Litigation Center Director, Mr. Nelson plans, supervises, and occasionally participates in cases that cover a wide range of topics across the medical-legal landscape, such as protection of the patient/physician relationship, physician payment, medical staff privileges, medical liability, peer review, and scope-of-practice. Mr. Nelson also serves as prosecuting attorney for the AMA Council on Ethical and Judicial Affairs.  Mr. Nelson graduated from Dartmouth College in 1969, and he received a master’s degree in physics from the University of Illinois in 1970.  He received his law degree from Harvard Law School in 1974.

 

Luncheon Address

 DAVID HYMAN, MD, JD, is the Ross and Helen Workman Chair in Law and Professor of Medicine at the University of Illinois, where he directs the Epstein Program in Health Law and Policy.  He focuses his research and writing on the regulation and financing of health care.  He teaches or has taught health care regulation, civil procedure, insurance, medical malpractice, law & economics, professional responsibility, and tax policy.  While serving as Special Counsel to the Federal Trade Commission, Professor Hyman was principal author and project leader for the first joint report ever issued by the Federal Trade Commission and Department of Justice, “Improving Health Care: A Dose of Competition” (2004).  He has published widely in student edited law reviews and peer reviewed medical, health policy, and law journals.   Prof. Hyman received his M.D. degree from the Pritzker School of Medicine at the University of Chicago, his J.D. degree with honors from the University of Chicago School of Law, and his B.A. in Biology from the University of Chicago

 

Panel #3: Creating Accountability through Medical Malpractice Reform and Alternative Dispute Resolution Efforts

 RICHARD BOOTHMAN, JD, is the Executive Director of Clinical Safety and Chief Risk Officer at the University of Michigan Health System and an Assistant Professor in the Department of Surgery at the University of Michigan Medical School.  When he joined the University of Michigan Health System in July 2001, he was intent on establishing a new approach to medical malpractice that would come to be known as the Michigan Model. By prioritizing patient safety over traditional “deny and defend,” he re-designed the process around three simple, incontestable principles: to compensate patients quickly and fairly when unreasonable care caused injury, to support caregivers vigorously when their care was reasonable and, most importantly, to learn and improve through patients’ experiences.  Prof. Boothman has extensive experience as a medical malpractice trial lawyer on behalf of individual and institutional health care providers in Michigan and Ohio. Prof. Boothman is a graduate of the University of Michigan and the University Of Detroit School Of Law.

 GERALD HICKSON, MD, is the Senior Vice President, Quality, Safety & Risk Prevention, Assistant Vice Chancellor for Health Affairs, and Joseph C. Ross Chair in Medical Education and Administration at Vanderbilt University Medical Center.  He is a national expert in patient safety and provider accountability.   Dr. Hickson, a pediatrician by practice, has spent many years studying medical malpractice, its causes and prevention.  He is a recognized leader in outcomes-based research on the incidence and prevalence of litigation in the medical profession –why families choose to file lawsuits, why certain physicians attract a disproportionate share of malpractice claims, and how to identify and intervene with high risk physicians.  Dr. Hickson is a graduate of the University of Georgia and the Tulane School of Medicine.  He completed his residency and fellowship training at Vanderbilt. 

 BARARA YOUNGBERG is a Senior Lecturer in Residence and Academic Director, Online Programs at Loyola University Chicago School of Law.  She is the former Vice President of Insurance, Risk, Quality Management & Legal Services for the University HealthSystem Consortium.  There, she had responsibility for the design and management of group professional liability and provider excess insurance programs and for supporting risk reduction, patient safety, quality management and legal, regulatory and compliance services for over 100 Academic Medical Centers nationwide.  Professor Youngberg holds a Bachelor of Science in Nursing from Illinois Wesleyan, a Master of Social Work from the University of Illinois, and Juris Doctor from DePaul University College of Law.

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SCHOOL OF LAW
Philip H. Corboy Law Center · 25 E. Pearson Street · Chicago, IL 60611 · 312.915.7120

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