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Loyola University Chicago

Registrar

School of Law

Dual Degree Policies

LOYOLA UNIVERSITY CHICAGO SCHOOL OF LAW
INFORMATION AND POLICY MANUAL
FOR DUAL DEGREE STUDENTS

 

Loyola University Chicago School of Law works with four schools within the University to facilitate dual degree programs. By pursuing two degrees through the dual degree program, students may obtain both degrees simultaneously in less time than if they pursued the degrees separately. Students obtaining two degrees through these programs are students of both schools, and are subject to both schools' policies and requirements. Students must be admitted to each school, should receive appropriate academic counseling from each school, and will receive a degree from each school. 

At the School of Law, each dual degree student will be matched with an appropriate law school professor who will serve as the academic advisor for the student.  Issues arising in the "non-law dual school" (the school with which you are seeking the non-law degree) should be raised with the appropriate administrators of the non-law dual school.

Successful completion of both degrees within the abbreviated time period requires advanced planning and flexibility on the part of the student.  In the past, students have found that pursuing two degrees is challenging and can be difficult, both from substantive as well as a logistical standpoint.  Given the challenge of trying to coordinate two graduate programs simultaneously, difficulties often arise with exam times, course start dates, registration, and tuition charges.  Please inform the Registrar, the Dean's Office or your advisor of problems that you may encounter.

Specific details regarding each program may be seen here.

Five dual degree programs

The four dual degrees offered with the School of Law are

 

The Schools of Law, Social Work, Political Science, and Education offer courses on a semester basis while the Quinlan School of Business offers courses on a quarter basis.

 

Prerequisites and Declaring Dual Degree Status

Prerequisites:
Dual degree students must be admitted to each school.  Once admitted to the School of Law, students complete their first year law courses before they take courses in the non-law dual school.  If a student begins coursework at the non-law dual school first, the School of Law will accept credits for non-law courses taken during the summer before their first year of law courses.

 

Declaring Dual Degree Status:
Individuals admitted to the School of Law should declare their dual degree status at the earliest possible time, either at the time of admission, upon entry into the law school, or as soon as the student has decided to participate in the program. Students may be permitted to enter into a dual degree program as late as the beginning of their final year of law studies, however they may not be eligible for the full range of benefits of the program.  Students will not be permitted to enter a dual degree program in their final semester.  New School of Law admittees should declare their intention to be a dual degree student to the Office of Admissions.  Students choosing to enter the dual degree program while taking law courses should declare their status to the Registrar of the School of Law.  In all cases, dual degree students must alert the School of Law's Office of Financial Aid.

 

Advantages of the program--Cross Credits and Reduced Tuition

 

Cross Credits:
Students enrolled in a dual degree program can transfer to the School of Law up to nine hours of semester courses (fifteen hours of quarter courses in the MBA Program are equivalent to nine semester hours in the Law program) completed in the non-law dual school, and receive credit toward the non-law degree for some of their law courses. In the School of Law, only the course credit and not the grade will transfer from the non-law courses. These transferred credits will count toward a student's Illinois Supreme Court Rule 711 status. The School of Law will accept any non-law course completed at the non-law dual school, but the non-law dual school will likely only accept certain law courses. Students must determine what law courses will transfer by speaking with a representative of the non-law dual school. Full-time law students must meet with the School of Law Registrar during or after the spring semester of their second year to request the transfer of credit from the non-law dual school into the law school; part-time students must meet with the law school Registrar during or after the fall semester of their third year.

 

Adjusted Tuition:
With proper planning, dual-degree students can benefit from adjustments to their tuition. Students are charged tuition by both schools for the courses for which they register. However, the University's Student Business Office ("SBO") will calculate the tuition of each dual degree student. Depending on the specifics of a dual-degree student's registration, the tuition calculation can be complicated. Below are a series of examples that help explain the calculations. The SBO will not adjust tuition until the end of law school registration. (Otherwise, their calculations may be incorrect for any student who drops/adds courses during the registration period.)

 

School of Business Quarter System:
The School of Business runs on the quarter system rather than on the semester system. For tuition purposes, School of Business's fall and winter terms is included in the School of Law's fall semester. The spring term is included with the School of Law's spring semester. The School of Law considers a three hour course on the quarter system to be the equivalent of a two hour course on the semester system. MBA courses are offered in three hour formats. Accordingly, completion of 15 quarter hours in the MBA Program will result in the award of the maximum of nine semester hours in the School of Law.

 

Financial Aid:
Students seeking law school financial aid should meet with the Director of Financial Aid as soon as they know their next semester's schedule. The sooner the Director knows what to expect, the more he can assist students. Students should contact him no later than the following:

 

For the Fall Semester End of June
For the Spring Semester Mid-December
For the Summer Session Mid-April

 

 

School of Law financial awards are applied to School of Law tuition only. Therefore, if a student is awarded any scholarships or stipends, it applies only to School of Law tuition. Students seeking non-law dual school financial aid should meet with that school's financial aid officer.

 

Registration
Students will register for their law classes during law school registration period and their non-law classes during that school's registration period. This means that students may not know if they can get into a law class before their non-law dual degree school's registration is closed. To accommodate students in attempting to enroll in their preferred law classes, students in their second-year of dual degree status may register as early as second-year J.D. students; students in their third- or fourth-year of dual degree status may register as early as third-year J.D. students. Students should be prepared to have alternative schedules.

 

Schools' Calendars
Each school determines its own calendar. Frequently, the two schools' course start times, breaks, and exams will not overlap. This may result in courses in one school starting during the examination period of the other school, or no common break, or even a strenuous fall and spring semester with a minimal winter break.

  

Tuition Examples

Below are a series of examples of how tuition is to be charged in the dual-degree programs. These examples are not exhaustive of all of the possible situations that may occur. The dollar amounts listed in the examples are purely hypothetical. If you are in doubt regarding how dual-degree tuition will be charged in your case, please see the Registrar or the Dean's Office prior to registration.

 

Example One
A full-time law student registers for 13 law hours and 3 additional graduate dual degree hours. The flat rate for law (12 to 17 hours) is $15,000, the graduate program rate is $2,000 for the 3 hour course. The 3 hour course will be absorbed into the flat rate and the student need only pay $15,000, rather than $17,000 ($15,000 + $2,000).

 

Example Two
A full-time law student registers for 11 law hours and 6 additional graduate dual degree hours. The flat rate for law (12 to 17 hours) is $15,000, the hourly rate for law is $1500, and the graduate program rate is $2,000 for a 3 hour course. The 6 graduate hours will be absorbed into the flat rate and the student will be charged $15,000 rather than $20,500 for 11 law hours (11 x $1,500) plus 2 graduate courses for (2 x $2,000).

 

Example Three
In the following example, the student exceeds the maximum number of hours permitted under ABA standards. The student must seek approval from the Dean for such a course-load. If approved, the following policy applies:

A full-time law student registers for 12 law hours and 6 additional graduate dual degree hours for a total of 18. The flat rate for law (12 to 17 hours) is $15,000, and the graduate dual degree rate is $2,000 for a 3 hour course. Five of The 6 graduate dual degree hours will be absorbed into the flat rate and the student will be charged $15,000 plus an additional charge of $666.66 for one additional hour based on the tuition charged by the graduate program ($2,000 x 1/3).

 

Example Four
A part-time law student registers for 8 hours of law and 3 additional graduate dual degree hours. The flat rate for law (8 to 12 hours) is $12,000, and the graduate dual degree rate is $2,000 for a 3 hour course. The 3 graduate dual degree hours will be absorbed into the flat rate and the student will be charged $12,000.

 

Example Five
A part-time law student registers for 6 hours of law and 3 additional graduate dual degree hours. The flat rate for law (8 to 12 hours) is $12,000, the hourly rate for law is $1,500, and the graduate dual degree rate is $2,000 for a 3 hour course. The student will be charged the flat rate of $12,000 since the combined 9 hours falls within the Law Part-Time Division range of 8-12 semester hours.

 

Example Six
A part-time law student registers for 12 hours of law and 3 additional graduate dual degree hours. The flat rate for law (8 to 12 hours) is $12,000, and the additional graduate dual degree rate is $2,000 for a 3 hour course. The student will be charged $14,000 for both the flat rate and the graduate dual degree course rate since the total number of law hours is the maximum hours for the part-­time flat rate.

 

Example Seven (J.D. / MBA dual degree students only)
A full time law student registers for 8 fall semester law hours, 3 additional graduate dual degree hours in the fall quarter, and 3 additional graduate dual degree hours in the winter quarter. The flat rate for law (12 to 17 hours) is $15,000, and the graduate program rate is $2,000 for a 3 hour course. This student would be entitled to the flat rate since the fall and winter graduate dual degree hours would be combined for 6 total graduate dual degree hours. This 6 plus the 8 law hours for the fall semester is a total of 14 hours for the tuition term.The student must notify the SBO that this will occur and the tuition will be adjusted accordingly.

 

Example Eight
A full-time second-year law student takes no law classes and 15 hours in the School of Social Work during the fall semester. The flat rate for law (12 to 17 hours) is $15,000, and the graduate program rate is $2,000 for a 3 hour course. Since she is coded as a law student in the dual degree program, she will be charged $15,000, the flat rate for law, rather than $10,000 (5 x $2,000) because she is considered a law student in the SOB coding system. If she takes from 12 to 17 hours, the student will be charged the flat law tuition without regard to the school from which the courses come. (After she graduates from the School of Law, charges will be made based solely on School of Social Work tuition.)

 

Example Nine
Since there is no flat rate in the summer, students are charged the law hourly rate for School of Law classes and the non-law hourly rate for non-law classes.

 

To download a printable PDF file of the Dual Degree Policies, click here.

Loyola

SCHOOL OF LAW REGISTRAR OFFICE
Philip H. Corboy Law Center · 25 E. Pearson Street Suite 1203 · Chicago, IL 60611 ·
312.915.7167 · E-mail: law-registrar@luc.edu

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