Loyola University Chicago

Registrar

School of Law

Constitutional & Governmental Law

This course examines the rules by which federal administrative agencies operate, including the source of administrative authority and procedures governing the exercise of that authority, and considers problems of delegation, agency, rulemaking, adjudication and enforcement powers, judicial review of administrative action, and due process requirements.

This course counts as an Experiential Learning and a Skills course.

The ChildLaw Legislation and Policy Clinic is part of the Civitas ChildLaw Center. Students in this Clinic have an opportunity to work, under the supervision of a faculty member, on a legislative or policy project that may involve any or all of the following: critiquing pending bills or existing legislation, drafting bills, developing summaries and fact sheets about pending bills, and building and working with coalitions to develop legislative ideas and consensus. Topics cover a range of child and family issues. Spring semester students primarily work on projects begun during the Fall Clinic, including researching and drafting legislation concerning child protection and juvenile justice reform issues. Students work in teams and must have sufficient time or flexibility during the work day to participate in some internal team meetings as well as attend meetings outside the Law School, as needed. Instructor permission required. Class hours TBD. (Weinberg)

The course will focus on the post-Civil War constitutional amendments (13th, 14th and 15th Amendments) and the various federal civil rights statutes that have been enacted thereafter in both the 19th and 20th centuries. These laws as a whole are designed to guarantee that all Americans receive equal treatment under law.

Experiential Learning

Skills

This course focuses on how lawyers work with communities and organizations to bring about change and takes a practical approach to understanding different forms of community-based lawyering. Students will work (for an approximate total of 50 hours in the semester) on projects with community organizations. Their work may entail doing research, creating fact sheets and manuals, conducting "know your rights" presentations in the community, helping to craft the message of a campaign, writing press releases, and strategizing with community members on how to identify and resolve particular issues. In addition to their fieldwork, every week, students will be assigned readings relating to course topics, such as organizing and different theories of change, the tools and strategies of lawyers, the history of lawyers working with different communities, and the role of law and lawyers in different movements. We will have discussions based on the assigned readings, and guest speakers will join us throughout the semester.

JD Required Course

Bar Course

An introduction to the United States Constitution. Subjects include the role of the United States Supreme Court, federalism, and separation of powers. Particular attention is paid to judicial power and judicial review, national legislative power including commerce power, commerce clause limitations upon state power to regulate, and presidential power and authority in both international and domestic affairs. (Geraghty, Raphael, Shoenberger, Tsesis, Zimmer)

This course covers interdisciplinary, critical perspectives on race and racism and the roles of law and history in shaping the meanings of race in the United States. We will study the histories of the major racialized groups in the United States: African Americans, Indians, Latinos/Latinas, Asian Americans, and Whites. We will also study the differing implications of enslavement, conquest, colonization, and immigration. We will explore how race and racism play out in selected areas such as equality, education and crime and explore significant current events and findings such as: important studies of implicit bias; the Voting Rights Act and allegedly race-neutral restrictions on voting; disparate treatment of minorities in the criminal justice system; and demographic changes and their implications.

I expect each student to complete a 25-page research paper on a subject of her choice related to the course. I will work with you to develop a topic and to organize your research in productive ways. Your final grades will be based primarily on your papers, together with your preparation for and participation in class. I.E., you must also do the reading for the course to get anything out of it. There is no final exam in this course. (Perea)

This course covers the procedural and substantive components of the due process and equal protection clauses. Other topics include the contracts clause and the takings clause. Civil rights legislation including sections 1981, 1982, 1983 and 1985(3) are covered.

599 – Externship – Intensive Field Placement Chicago (2-3)

Experiential Learning

Skills

Full-time students who have completed all required first year courses and part-time students who have completed a minimum of 28 credit hours may apply for an externship at an approved field placement. Certain field placements may limit eligibility to students who have completed certain course work or who have obtained their Illinois Supreme Court Rule 711 license. Students enrolled in an externship may receive 2 or 3 hours of non-graded credit for supervised work performed at an approved field placement coupled with their attendance and participation in the classroom component of the course. The classroom component has been designed to complement the externship experience with a focus on professionalism, ethics, and practice based skill building.  There is no final examination in this course. This course is offered each semester. (Gough, Kieffer)

 

599 – Externship – Intensive Field Placement Washington, DC (2-3)

Experiential Learning

Skills

Full-time students who have completed all required first year courses and part-time students who have completed a minimum of 28 credit hours may apply for an externship at an approved field placement. Certain field placements may limit eligibility to students who have completed certain course work or who have obtained their Illinois Supreme Court Rule 711 license. Students enrolled in an externship may receive 2 or 3 hours of non-graded credit for supervised work performed at an approved field placement coupled with their attendance and participation in the classroom component of the course. The classroom component has been designed to complement the externship experience with a focus on professionalism, ethics, and practice based skill building.  There is no final examination in this course. This course is offered only during the summer semester. (Gough, Poll-Klaessy)

This course examines the history, theory, and jurisprudence of the First Amendment, with particular emphasis on the speech, press and religion clauses.

This course will introduce students into the roles of government, charitable, and private institutions in identifying, preventing, and addressing public health issues.  Students explore the role of state government, federal government, and the private sector in addressing issues surrounding healthcare delivery, access, financing, quality, cost control, the uninsured, transparency, and public health.  Students will have the opportunity to draft analysis of government policies and work in teams to present on a public health issue. (Carvalho, Deaton)

The role of the legislative branch of government in health care is explored through a review of major government health programs and policies Students will learn how health policy gets formulated, evaluated and assessed prior to being voted into law and will then explore the process of new policy implementation. Issues to be explored will be drawn from the wide array of health matters in which governments are involved.

This course covers the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act and the statutory and regulatory framework for the privacy and security of health information. Students will learn about the historical basis of privacy and global comparisons. Topics will include data privacy, security, oversight, and breaches of protected health information.

Skills

This class will provide an in-depth exploration of legislative process and procedure on the state level, the legislative institution and the impact of electoral politics on lawmaking. Through the use of case studies and guest speakers who are part of the process, students will learn the many components of lawmaking and how all come together in today’s political culture.

Perspective Elective

This seminar surveys the domestic and international law governing the use of the U.S. military both domestically and internationally. Topics include the constitutional power to initiate military action abroad, the law regulating the military and its operations, and the permissible and impermissible domestic uses of the military. It will also briefly touch upon the constitutional rights of service members and introduce students to certain unique aspects of the military criminal justice system. Several short papers focusing primarily on the civil liberties of the public and of service members are required.

One of our first Freedoms: the freedom to worship in the way of one’s conscience is arguably the foundation of liberty in the United States. This course will concern itself with the First Amendment’s protections and limitations on our religious liberty by an examination of both historic and current issues in religious freedom whether involving personal behavior, medical issues or political activity tinged with religious issues. In addition to constitutional protections federal and state legislation concerning religious liberty will also be examined. A presentation and paper on topic in the area from each student will be required. 

The aim of this seminar is to provide students with a deeper understanding of the Supreme Court of the United States, its personnel and work, and the important role it plays in American government and society. Students will consider the processes by which Justices are appointed to the Court; the standards and processes the Court uses to choose cases for review and decision on the merits from among the multitude decided each year by the lower courts, leading to the creation of precedents of national applicability; the ways in which advocates endeavor to persuade the Court that it should (or should not) grant review in a particular case; and the ways in which the so-called “merits cases” (those in which review has been granted) are briefed, argued, and decided. A substantial part of the semester will be devoted to the study of a small number of cases currently pending before the Court, either as candidates for review or for decision on the merits. Students will learn about the work of the Court by studying briefs that were actually filed and transcripts or recordings of oral arguments. The class will also discuss cases by simulating the Court’s conference. Students will be required to write a series of short papers and a judicial opinion in one of the merits cases to be discussed. (Sullivan)