Loyola University Chicago

- Navigation -

Loyola University Chicago

Registrar

School of Law

Courses I - L

Skills

The course will focus on a substantive review of Illinois criminal law, its origins and evolution. It will also focus on policy decisions and trends that that drive changes in criminal laws. While the focus of the course is Illinois centric, the statutes and policies reflect national criminal law and policy trends. (Baroni)

Bar 

Skills

Ninety percent of all litigation is in the state courts. If you plan on practicing in the Illinois state courts, you have to take this class. Teaming a star civil litigator with two veteran judges, this newly redesigned course will focus sharply on the crucial knowledge and skills needed to survive the confusing and hectic court system. Eliminating a final exam, the course will test your written and oral argument skills in a more realistic way in the context of the labyrinth of procedural rules and statutes that govern different phases of civil litigation in Illinois. Using actual cases, students will learn how the rules apply to the facts and substantive law in a concrete way, as well as how to argue issues arising in the pre-trial setting. If you want to study obscure or never-to-be-repeated scenarios, this course is not for you. Instead, we plan to pare down the syllabus and study pleading skills, motions to dismiss, discovery, summary judgment and the other litigation skills that dominate the life of a civil practitioner. Because so many graduates are now thrown directly into the courtroom either as solo practitioners or litigation associates, the course has been reshaped to be immediately useful the first time you head up to court. (Donnelly, Tailor, Kotin)

This course includes an examination of the following: historical perspective; execution of the laws; the 1952 Act and its amendments, including the 1986 amendments; a review of the immigration system including judicial review and the naturalization and citizenship process; rights, privileges and obligations of aliens in the U.S.; ethics of legal practice in this area; the future of immigration law and policy. (McCormick, Vinikoor)

An estimated 12 million people live and work in the United States illegally, according to many news accounts. As the immigration debate rages, the focus is on both the immigrant workers and the employers who supply the jobs.  It has been illegal to employ unauthorized immigrants in the U.S. since 1986. The Immigration Form & Control Act (IRCA) requires all employers to verify employment eligibility through the I-9 form, but the government has not been consistent enforcing immigration laws in the workplace. Moreover, many states and municipalities have taken on the issue and have passed their own immigration laws.  The Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) agency is responsible for ensuring that employers comply with the law and has issued new priorities in workplace enforcement.  Other laws protecting workers, such as labor and comprehensive immigration reform. This course will focus on the obligations of US employers, both under IRCA and beyond and the implications of illegal immigrant employment. It will examine pitfalls that await an employer who tries to comply with the law and analyze the penalties that can be assessed against an employer who discriminates against workers because they appear foreign. It will also review the civil and criminal penalties against employers who knowingly employ unauthorized workers, sometimes exploiting them with substandard working conditions, reviewing cases that have been brought against employers.
 
This is a seminar class limited to 20 students. Attendance is mandatory. Students will be assigned to a team and each week, the team will be expected to report on various aspects of this issue, with assigned readings.  The last five weeks of class will be devoted to student presentations on relevant issues.  Students will choose topics of interest and, with approval, will give a presentation, write a paper and submit a research file. No exam.

Non-Graded

With the consent of a faculty member supervising the research, a student may earn one or two units of ungraded credit. The scope and subject is arranged between the student and the faculty member. It is expected that for each hour of academic credit the student will produce a scholarly work of publishable quality of approximately 30 pages in length. The project that is the subject of the Independent Research must be completed during the semester in which the registration occurs. (For additional requirements see the associate dean.)

This course offers a basic study of the legal aspects of insurance. Problems common to all types of insurance are considered, including problems of policy interpretation, rights and liabilities of parties and companies, and the regulation of the insurance industry. In addition, special problems raised by particular types of insurance policies are considered. (Sampen)

Skills

The course is an introduction to the law of intellectual property. This course is a pre-requisite for advanced courses in IP, but also a good survey of the area for students interested in pursing other legal careers. The focus of the course is on understanding the distinctions and similarities between the various aspects of intellectual property law. The predominate focus on the course is on trademark, patent and copyright law (in about equal proportions), with some attention also devoted to the law of trade secrets. No technical background is expected or required. (Donoghue, Frischmann, Ho)

This a unique course offered once a year to a select group of students from Loyola and Chicago-Kent. Enrolled students read and discuss draft articles of nationally renowned professors in the field of intellectual property; the articles are typically draft law review articles. The discussions are focused on helping the professors to refine and improve their articles, such that a strong foundation of intellectual property is expected, even though there is no official pre-requisite. This course meets every week, but the students only meet in person roughly half the time, with the other half of the sessions done by videoconference. Three of the in-person classes will be at Chicago-Kent; for those days, the class will begin at 4:10 pm and end by 5:50pm to allow students adequate travel time. There is no final exam or research project required for this class. Instead, students are required to attend and actively participate in all classes. Students are selected based on an application that is available at www.chicagoip.com.

Experiential Learning

Skills

This course is taken in conjunction with the Health Justice Project course and provides students with an opportunity to participate in an interdisciplinary team to address health problems of low-income patients. Students partner with medical residents and doctors to explore communication and ethical issues among disciplines and actively participate in precepting and grand rounds with medical and social work partners. Faculty permission required.

Perspective Elective
Skills

This seminar explores issues of family violence, with an emphasis on domestic violence, through an interdisciplinary lens. An overview of the laws, public policy, and psychosocial approaches and trends addressing family violence issues. The course seeks to provide an opportunity for students in different disciplines to learn about the theories, philosophies, ethics, and practices of the range of professions that must confront family violence issues, and the impact of decision making in one forum on the practices and decisions made in another forum. Student are challenged to consider the strengths and weakness of the responses of various disciplines, and their interaction.

In the last twenty years, the international community has made tremendous strides in agreeing on a set of basic human rights for children and implementing those rights through domestic, regional and international laws. This two-credit course serves as an introduction to international children's rights, and explores such thematic topics as corporal punishment, intercountry adoption, juvenile justice, child labor, and international child abduction.

This module explores the internationalization of competition law in the context of globalization and international trade. It examines the regulatory framework governing competition among firms internationally, identifying and analyzing the existing limitations and challenges in this regard. In particular, it looks into rules governing extraterritorial jurisdiction, discovery, recognition and enforcement of judgments in the international context. It also explores issues pertaining to merger review, trade and competition interface and the existing cooperation between antitrust agencies. The course is comparative in nature and focuses predominantly on US Antitrust and EU Competition Law. No prior knowledge of competition law (antitrust) or international economic law is assumed. (Martyniszyn)

Assessment: Class participation (10%), two small class presentations (10% each, in total 20%), 6500 words essay (70%)

Note: for the purposes of this module students may be required to watch Hollywood movies and YouTube clips!

Perspective Elective

This seminar will begin with a brief baseline description of some of the most significant features of United States labor and employment law. Comparative materials will then cover the basic employment laws of Canada and Mexico. We will then look at the regional regime established in the NAFTA labor side accords. Next we will move to Europe to study the employment laws of the United Kingdom, Germany and France, followed by the regional employment laws generated by the European Union. Following that, we will look at the employment laws of Japan, China and India. The final focus of the seminar will be on International labor law, particularly the International Labor Organization. (Zimmer)

This is a one credit course taught sometimes in one of the summer programs. In this course, students will learn how international commercial arbitration works. In most international contracts, the parties agree that all disputes will be resolved by arbitration. This private dispute mechanism provides a number of advantages over litigation. One of the most important advantages is that by agreeing to arbitrate, a party avoids ending up in the other party's court system. An arbitration award is also more easily enforced in a foreign jurisdiction than a court judgment, because of an international treaty known as the New York Convention. Students will learn about the various laws and rules governing international arbitration, as well as specific, practical knowledge about arbitrating, such as how to draft an arbitration clause, how to choose an arbitral institution, how to select arbitrators, the ethical rules that apply to arbitrators, the bases for challenging arbitrators, the conduct of the arbitral hearing, rules governing admission of evidence, availability of interim measures, the grounds for vacating an award, and the means of enforcing an award. (Moses)

Arbitration is increasingly the dispute mechanism of choice, particularly in international disputes. In private international commercial arbitration, neither party wants to be required to resolve a dispute in the foreign court system of the opposing party. In state to state arbitrations, and in state to private company arbitrations, no sovereign state is willing to be subject to the jurisdiction of another sovereign state. Thus, as international business and investment has grown, so has the prevalence of arbitration to resolve international disputes. This course will focus on various forms of international arbitration, whether between two private companies from different countries trying to resolve a contract dispute, two sovereign nations involved in a border dispute, or an investor and a host country dealing with an investment dispute. No prerequisite is required.

Perspective Elective
This course will explore the international legal aspects involved in the art industry. For this one credit course, the materials will focus on the acquisition and ownership of art that crosses borders. Specific questions will include the acquisition of works of art privately through foreign dealers or galleries, or by way of auction, and the questions of competing title that arise over works of art or cultural property proceeding from war or peace time looting.

Perspective Elective

An introduction to the legal aspects of international business. The course emphasizes the legal problems associated with international trade in goods and foreign direct investment, and covers regulation at the private, national, and international levels, and also may include an extended treatment of international litigation problems and/or the role of the multinational enterprise in world business. (Haney, Heard, Moses, Walker)

In the last decade, children have become "the newest kids on the human rights block." This seminar examines new laws and treaties developed to respond to age-old problems faced by children around the world. The course begins with a study of the U.N. Convention on the Rights of the Child, the most rapidly and widely accepted human rights document in the history of international law. It then examines ways in which these laws are being implemented, including a review of child and family law cases decided by the European Court of Human Rights in Strasbourg. The course explores such substantive areas as the comparative treatment of child abuse and delinquency, and the issues of child labor, international abduction, the plight of child soldiers, and the sexual exploitation of children. (Geraghty)

Experiential Learning
Skills


(This class is limited to 16 students)

The course uses as a focus the Willem C. Vis International Moot Arbitration Competition. Sponsored by Pace Law School, the Vis Moot is based on a problem governed by the U.N. Convention on Contracts for the International Sale of Goods (CISG). In the spring, an oral competition is held in two different venues, Vienna and Hong Kong. Recently, Loyola has been able to send a different team of students to each of the venues. The course includes about three weeks of study of the CISG, as well as approximately three weeks of study of international commercial arbitration, including basic laws and rules, how to draft an arbitration clause, how to choose an arbitrator, and how to participate in an arbitration as an advocate and as an arbitrator.

While the first half of the semester is spent learning about the CISG and arbitration, the second half is spent putting that knowledge into practice. When the problem on which the Moot Competition is based comes on line in October, students work collaboratively to draft Claimants' and Respondents' memoranda. The Claimant's memorandum is due in early December, and the Respondent's memorandum is due in late January. Students also present an oral argument before arbitrators from Chicago law firms, at the offices of the respective law firms. At the end of the semester, a second oral argument is held at the law school, after which students are chosen who will have the opportunity to compete in Vienna and Hong Kong during the spring semester, for an additional two hours of credit.

Through the emphasis on both brief writing and oral arguments, students make significant progress in their skills as advocates, as well as their understanding of dispute resolution in an international context. Their accomplishments have been well recognized in both competitions. More information about the Vis Moot is on the Pace Law School Website: www.cisg.law.pace.edu/vis.html.

Eligibility: If a student is part of a moot court team that will be arguing in the fall semester, he or she is not eligible to take this course, since this is a skills-based course requiring substantial out of class effort in both brief writing and oral argument. If a student is part of a moot court team that will be arguing in the spring semester, he or she is eligible to take the course in the fall, but will not be eligible to compete to be an oralist in the Vienna or Hong Kong competition. Corboy Fellows are not permitted to take this course. The course is not open to LLM students, unless they wish to audit.

Important: Permission of the professor is required. In order to apply, please submit a resume and a statement of interest to Professor Moses, mmoses1@luc.edu explaining a little about your background, and why you are interested in taking this course. (Davis, Moses)

This is an upper division elective which focuses on key issues in international/comparative health law and policy encountered in the global arena. While there are no explicit prerequisites, students should have some background in public health law as well as general health law. The class will be taught in a tutorial fashion requiring students to be involved in three group project exercises on selected topics. In addition each student will be required to write two papers.  Topics to be covered include international public health law institutions, WHO, WTO, UN, NGOs, the role of private law, and legal issues surrounding topics such as communicable disease prevention and treatment, climate change and health, sanitation, violence and public health, population planning and control, migration and health, trafficking in people and organs, global e-health, micro-financing and health.  Readings will be assigned, largely from web based materials. (Blum)

Perspective Elective

This course examines the civil, political, economic and other rights secured to individuals and groups by international law. It examines the major source of those rights, including the United Nations and regional organizations, and it discusses the substantive content of those rights. Particular attention is given to how those rights are enforced, from judicial decisions in national and international tribunals through other mechanisms developed in various international and regional settings, including the role of NGOs. No prerequisite. (Haney, Shoenberger)

This course introduces the structure of the international legal system, examining the sources of international law; the roles of states, individuals and other actors; methods of dispute resolution; and the status of international law in the U.S. The course examines topics of substantive law, including the use of force. Finally, the course examines how international law affects, and can be used in, domestic practice. (Haney)

This seminar will examine select topics in contemporary international law practice and scholarship. Approximately every other week, the course will feature presentations of papers or works in progress by a leading international law scholar or practitioner. Students will submit short written comments of each paper in advance of its presentation. These comments will be sent to the speaker and the two hour session will be devoted to discussion of the paper and these comments. No prerequisite is required.

This course will focus on international tort issues, including products liability, medical malpractice, and the role of torts in terrorism.

Perspective Elective

The course focuses on the law governing the international sales of goods, with a particular emphasis on the United Nations Convention on Contracts for the International Sales of Goods (the "CISG"). Topics including the scope of the CISG, contract formation under the CISG, buyers' and sellers' performance obligations under the CISG are compared and contrasted with corresponding approaches under British and American law (particularly with regard to Article 2 of the American Uniform Commercial Code). Attention is also paid to risk-of-loss issues arising in relation to the International Chamber of Commerce's commercial delivery terms ("incoterms"). (
Williams)

Prerequisite: Federal Income Tax. This course focuses on U.S. income tax issues with respect to the foreign activities of U.S. taxpayers and U.S. activities of foreign taxpayers. Particular emphasis is placed on the corporate taxpayer. Foreign tax systems are not addressed specifically except to highlight differences from the U.S. system. Specific topics include the foreign tax credit, sourcing rules, the "effectively connected" doctrine, the concept of trade or business in the U.S. Code section 482 allocations, subpart F income, and tax treaties. (Brunson)

This course is designed to familiarize the students with the regulatory system of international trade. Through the materials discussed in the course, focusing on the case law and jurisprudence of the WTO/GATT, the course is aimed at understanding the institutional framework of that system and the ways in which it functions. In addition the course deals with a large number of substantive issues on the international trade agenda. 

While the course is focused on legal theory and doctrine of international trade, we will approach each and every topic from economic and social perspectives. Thus, the course is designed to follow a truly interdisciplinary tour of the relevant subject-matter. 

The issues covered in the course include: Theory and Policy of International Trade; The Legal Structure of the GATT/WTO System; Dispute Settlement; The Most-Favored-Nation (MFN) Principle; Multilateralism and Regionalism; The National Treatment Clause; Escape Clauses and Safeguards; Article XX Exceptions and whether they include human rights rationales for deviating from otherwise binding obligations; Dumping and Antidumping Law; Subsidies and Countervailing Duties; Trade and Intellectual Property Rights: the TRIPS Agreement and access to essential medicines in particular; Trade in Services: the GATS; Trade and the environment; as well as Trade and development.  (Gathii)

Perspective Elective 

The course will explore First Amendment jurisprudence as applied to Internet communications as well as the regulation of Internet content in such contexts as incitement, speech that promotes or facilitates criminal acts, true threats, matters relating to national security, obscenity, indecency, and child pornography. Other topics covered include on-line defamation, including immunities under Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act and claims involving anonymous communications, privacy interests, data mining, on-line profiling, as well as regulatory and statutory approaches to privacy protections. Some attention will be paid to copyright and trademark claims, disputes relating to domain names, and the Digital Millennium Copyright Act. This course will be a 2 hour course with an examination. Students interested in writing a paper may do so for an additional hour of credit. (Shoenberger)

This required course is designed to give students an introductory overview of the law as it affects children. It begins with a discussion of the constitutional relationship among children, parents and the state, as well as the respective roles of the federal and state governments in the regulation of children and families.  The course then introduces students to the principal areas of civil and criminal law that affect children and families. With this baseline of understanding, students can choose elective courses that provide a more in-depth study of a particular topic (e.g. education law, child welfare, etc.).

Perspective Elective

This course aims to provide students with an overview of the modern Chinese legal and political systems and lawyering in China. As an economy and society in transition, China has undergone tremendous changes and is facing many challenges while it seeks to transition into a market economy with Chinese characteristics. Our class discussion will focus on the issues that China is trying to address and the pitfalls of which international legal practitioners should be aware of when representing clients doing business in China or with Chinese companies. The course consists of two components (with a little Chinese culture, language and survival tips sprinkled in as appropriate): 1. an overview of the historical foundations of Chinese law and the present legal system and political institutions in China; and 2. a brief introduction of Chinese laws applicable to US companies doing business in China. When necessary and/or appropriate, this course may be co-taught by a lawyer/practitioner active in the Chinese legal market. (Study Abroad China)

Non-Graded
Skills


This course teaches incoming Loyola students the skills essential for success in law school.  Students will learn how to read cases, prepare for class discussions, and take notes, as well as how to prepare for and answer final examination questions.  Students will also learn fundamental legal writing skills and will draft a legal memorandum.   Oral argument will also be introduced. 

Non-Graded
Perspective Elective

This lecture series is a mandatory preparatory course for students who have been selected to participate in the annual London Comparative Advocacy Program.  It explores a variety of issues pertaining to the English history and its legal professions. Topics include the history of the common law, the development of the English legal profession, English civil and criminal procedure, the role of the European Union in English law, the modern legal professions and the history of London. (Faught)

Experiential Learning

Skills

Students enrolled in Introduction to Health Justice serve as client advocates. Students conduct intake and, through direct interaction with clients, practice issue spotting, interview skills and creative problem-solving.  Clients may present with variety of matters related to health, such as housing code violations, medical debt, disability, special education, public benefits denials and other critical needs. Students also gain an understanding of interdisciplinary collaboration in the practice of law and an overview of legal systems that respond to poverty and health disparities. Students must be available to participate in a mandatory orientation prior to the start of the semester and are expected to maintain a minimum of six office hours per week. Faculty permission required.

Perspective Elective

This course provides a broad survey of the most fundamental legal issues surrounding the delivery of health care in America. No prior knowledge of health law is required. Major topics include state and federal regulation of health care providers and institutions; tort liability in the context of medical care; patient and provider rights and obligations; public and private insurance systems; and basic issues in bioethics and public health. By the end of this course, students should understand both the current state of American health law, and the social forces that have shaped its historical development. (Blum, Sawicki, Singer)

This course is designed to expose students to the legal issues that arise from the relationship between and among patients and health care providers. Areas of focus include: conflicts between cost effective and high quality health care, access to care, individual and institutional liability, public and private regulation, accreditation and licensure, hospital/medical staff relationships, patient rights, with a special focus on informed consent, and other legal issues in the acute care setting. THIS CLASS IS ONLY AVAILABLE ONLINE AND WITH PERMISSION.

The course will begin by examining the origins of Islamic Law and its sources. Following the introduction, the course will shift to explore several substantives area of Islamic Law, such as constitutional law, family law, criminal law, and Islamic finance. These areas will be examined through a study of various cases in in the legal system of contemporary, Muslim-majority states, especially in the Middle East and Southeast Asia. The course will also explore the intersection of Islamic Law and human rights in contemporary Muslim-majority states. At the end of this course, students have to write a twenty page paper on a particular issue of Islamic Law for successful completion of the course. (Hendrianto)

This course is required for international students in the LL.M. in U.S. Law or the LL.M. in International Law.

This required foundational course introduces students to the sources and functions of law in our society. The course begins with an explanation of the structure and traditions of the American court system. Students then learn to read and analyze cases and statutes and develop basic legal written and oral presentation skills. The course uses cases from various fields and provides students with the background they will need for understanding American law. (Blanke)

Non-Graded

This course provides an overview of the legal research process. The student will learn basic legal research skills with a focus on online legal sources. Students will search for health law cases, statutes, regulations and law journal articles. They will learn how to use citators to verify that a case or statute is still good law and also learn the proper form for citation of legal authorities. (MJ only or with permission.) THIS CLASS IS ONLY AVAILABLE ONLINE AND WITH PERMISSION.

This foundational course introduces students to the sources and functions of law in our society. The course begins with an explanation of the structure of the American court system. Students then learn to read and brief cases, synthesize cases, and develop basic legal writing and analysis skills. Through multiple short writing assignments, students learn to construct a legal office memorandum, the final course requirement. The course utilizes health law cases and problems and provides students with background for future health law studies. (MJ only or with permission.) THIS CLASS IS ONLY AVAILABLE ONLINE AND WITH PERMISSION.

This required foundational course introduces students to the sources and functions of law in our society. The course begins with an explanation of the structure and traditions of the American court system. Students then learn to read and analyze cases and statutes and develop basic legal written and oral presentation skills. The course uses child and family law cases and problems and provides students with the background they will need for future children's law and policy studies.

Perspective Elective

This seminar attempts to identify the philosophical underpinnings, moral standards and political presuppositions of various legal regimes. A series of short papers is required. There are no prerequisites. (Anastaplo)

Perspective Elective

This seminar addresses the philosophical underpinnings, moral standards and political presuppositions of various legal regimes that are distinct from those studied in Jurisprudence I. A series of short papers is required. There are no prerequisites. (Anastaplo)

This course explores the law, policies and practices of the American juvenile justice system, past, present and future. The focus is on children who are in conflict with the law and those who, by virtue of their status as children, are subject to the jurisdiction of the juvenile court for engaging in conduct such as curfew violations, running away, and other forms of potentially harmful adolescent behavior. Among other issues, the course will examine how juvenile justice law and policy has been shaped by new research on adolescent development, including brain research.

Perspective Elective
Skills


This course will attempt to answer the following questions: How should society handle allegations of criminal behavior by children? In what way should the proceedings be designed to address the differences between children and adults? Who should decide whether a child should benefit from special treatment, judges or legislators? What responsibility do parents and communities bear in providing children an opportunity to change their behavior? How should the justice system and the school system interact? While the intersection between the child welfare and juvenile justice systems will be discussed, this course will not address child welfare practice generally or in much detail. Students will be required to prepare brief position papers during the term. The remainder of the grade will be based on performance in class and on a final examination or a major research paper written in lieu of the final exam. (Geraghty)

Experiential Learning

Skills

This course, which meets once a week for two hours, will explore in depth labor and employment issues in the 21st century education workplace. Students will form teams -- representing individual employees, the union, and management- and advocate their respective positions in a variety of contexts, including collective bargaining, unfair labor practice proceedings, teacher discipline and dismissal proceedings, and contract grievance arbitration. Current events and contemporaneous developments will provide the backdrop for the course materials and class activities. Topics will include: tenure, reduction-in-force and seniority rights, and teacher accountability and evaluation of professional personnel under new education reform legislation; public sector bargaining trends in Illinois and nationally; the 2012 Chicago Public Schools teachers strike; LGBT issues, free speech, and workplace right of privacy.

This course examines the development of the law under the National Labor Relations Act. This statute and its decisional law are the primary means of governmental regulation of the union management relationship in the private sector. The organizational process and the collective bargaining process are the fundamental arenas in which to study the rights and duties of three separate entities: the individual, the union, and the employer.

Topics that may be covered include: (1) procedures and principles governing both the selection and decertification of unions; (2) the free speech, access and other rights of management and unions during an organizational campaign; (3) the duty to bargain in good faith; (4) the laws respecting strikes, lockouts, boycotts, and other concerted action by employees; (5) the duty of fair representation; (6) compulsory dues and other payment to unions; (7) the enforcement of collective bargaining agreements in grievance-arbitration and/or court action; and (8) the procedural and substantive law governing "unfair labor practices," by both employers and unions. (Cooper, Luetkemeyer)

This course provides a study of the limitations imposed upon the use of privately owned land by the law of nuisance, by private co-tenants and easements, and by public action. The course examines the planning process, subdivision regulations and zoning. (Brankin, Burney, Furda, Hanley)

Advanced seminar that provides students with the opportunity to concentrate on issues of their choice related to historic or contemporary development patterns in urban America.

Prerequisite: Land Use 350 or comparable land use survey course is a prerequisite. Flexible scheduling available. (Furda)

This course is intended to provide an understanding of basic accounting principles and their practical application in connection with the practice of law. There are no prerequisites and no requirement of a business background. Topics covered include fundamental principles of accounting for business enterprises; how to analyze and understand an income statement, balance sheet, and statement of cash flow; basic concepts of revenue recognition; conventions for capitalization versus expenses; and how to recognize possible manipulation of financial and accounting statements. Recent high profile accounting scandals such as Enron and WorldCom will also be explored.

Students investigate issues arising from advances in biological science and technology and learn about their impact on the legal rights and of patients, health providers, and government policy makers. Issues explored range from legal and ethical dilemmas in the treatment of individuals to broader societal issues addressing the allocation of health care resources. THIS CLASS IS ONLY AVAILABLE ONLINE AND WITH PERMISSION.

Perspective Elective

This course introduces students to the major documents that comprise the Catholic Church's social teachings. The documents will serve as a basis for a broader discussion of whether the social teaching has anything relevant to say or should have to say about current trends in American law. Considers whether lawyers of faith are obliged to move the law in a direction that comports with their core religious values and how that can be done in a pluralistic society; whether Catholic social teaching offers ideas and values that might find broad-based acceptance; and what happens if a lawyer determines that the profession and/or the society are hostile to the values presented in the social teaching. A twenty page paper delving into a particular issue or subject matter will be required for successful completion of the course. (2 Credits; however, a 3 Credit option is available to those members of the seminar who write a longer paper of thirty pages.) (Araujo)

This course focuses on the application of economic principles to legal analysis. The course provides an introduction to basic economic principles and math concepts. (Langenfeld, Ramirez)

From the turn of the 20th century through today, law has been critically important to American cinema and American cinema has been critically important to the law. This course will examine how cinema represents the law, indoctrinates audiences in jurisprudence, and explores the position of law in our culture. The course will consider such topics as the ways in which cinema portrays the negotiation of cultural conflicts through the law, interrogates the associations between law and morality, and reinterprets historical cases, evincing cultural anxieties and desires with regard to the legal system. Further, we will analyze how law films investigate issues of guilt and justice, situate audiences as jurors, and create ideal and flawed images of the lawyer, law firms, and the lawyer-client association. Films for class discussion will include Anatomy of a Murder, To Kill a Mockingbird, Presumed Innocent, Judgment at Nuremberg, Compulsion, 12 Angry Men, Michael Clayton, Adam’s Rib, Philadelphia, and The Social Network.

This course will introduce students to an array of legal and social issues associated with gambling. Topics will include casino gambling in Illinois, administrative law involving licensing, investigations, adjudications and due process, problem gambling, rulemaking, Indian gaming, internet gaming and associated issues. Various statutes, cases, articles, Attorney General Opinions and rules will be examined and discussed. Guest speakers may be utilized to emphasize a particular topic. (Fries)

The aim of this seminar is to see what can be learned about the law from literature; that is, to study the law poetically. The assigned readings vary, but the following have been used in past offerings: Sophocles, Antigone; Plato, Apology, Meno; Shakespeare, Measure for Measure, The Merchant of Venice; Melville, Billy Budd; Arthur Miller, The Crucible; Robert Bolt, A Man For All Seasons, The Pentateuch; Milton, Paradise Lost. Papers are written; there is no final examination. No prerequisites. (Berlin)

Perspective Elective

This course concerns those areas of civil law which most affect low income persons: landlord/tenant, federal housing, welfare, social security, Medicaid, Medicare, unemployment compensation, and civil rights. Other systemic issues will be explored, such as wealth discrimination, use of legal remedies to promote social change, and the delivery of legal services to low income persons. (Ramirez, Rose)

For many years, the field of psychology focused primarily on mental illness. But more recently, many psychologists have begun to analyze happiness and to study the ways in which all people, healthy or ill, can increase their enjoyment of life. This course will explore the new field of hedonic psychology, evaluating its methods and examining its findings. We will consider whether legal policy can or should be shaped by these findings in an effort to help people become happier. (Bronsteen)

This course explores the role of law and government regulation in the area of public health. The public health process (measurement, problem definition, strategy, design, implementation and evaluation) is explored in reference to current issues that are both timely and expositive of the ways in which law and regulation shape public health practice at the local, state, federal and international levels. Topical areas for analysis and discussion are drawn from the primary environments of public health; biological, physical, social, individual behavior, and national/international health systems. Students are required to work on group projects, and write a research paper. (Blum)

Beginning in late 2007, a rash of defaults in subprime mortgages triggered a historic credit crisis. This crisis has now resulted in a historic global economic contraction. This class will examine the role of law in precipitating and propagating the crisis. Financial regulation, corporate governance, globalization, and housing law will be examined to determine the role of each in creating the crisis and amplifying the crisis. Specific solutions will be offered. Finally, an institutional assessment of law and regulation will be undertaken to consider broader reforms. (Ramirez)

This survey course presents students with the range of legal issues arising from the intersection of technology and the law. The course is highly interactive and will explore topics such the implications of internet ubiquity and jurisdictional analysis, First Amendment/free speech, electronic discovery, digital copyrights, trademarks and domain names, cyber crime, electronic privacy, e-commerce, and Internet governance. There are no prerequisites for this course. Grades for the course will be based on a mock Rule 16 conference, and in-class exam and class participation.

Drawing from the clinical legal experience of the student, this course will be a seminar which examines Jesuit documents and Sacred Scripture as objective criteria for class discussion. The goal of the course is to formulate and hone the skill of personal reflection and contemplation as the means of developing personal spirituality from a Jesuit perspective. Students will be expected to actively participate in classroom discussion, maintain a weekly journal, and present a summary paper at the end of the course. (Costello)

Skills

This course will focus on various legal and practical considerations that attorneys must face both during and following the jury selection process. The course will cover: Constitutional issues; what must be proven to establish bias; the role of trial consultants (particularly in high profile cases); challenges to the array, challenges for cause and peremptory challenges; timing and procedural limitations; the significance of group dynamics; questioning techniques and the use of questionnaires; problems at trial and during deliberations; and the extent to which the parties may be entitled to examine prospective jurors in various areas of inquiry (such as occupation, education, knowledge of the case, legal and government experience, religious and educational beliefs). Students will participate in a mock voir dire, prepare a draft questionnaire and complete a brief (5-7 page) paper on a topic to be selected in consultation with the instructor. (Donner)

Skills

In ways that vary from federal assistance to hurricane victims, to governmental health care programs to commercial insurance, risk management has become a vital component of the American economy. Life insurance, Medicare, FEMA and commercial litigation all represent components of an extensive public undertaking to manage risks of financial loss. To counsel and represent clients appropriately in connection with this part of the economy, it is often necessary to view issues from an unusual perspective, to "follow the loss" rather than "follow the money."  This course provides a broad overview of the law of risk management, introducing students to ways in which the quantification of financial risks, the spreading of financial risk and other insurance concepts have been employed by courts and other governmental authorities to manage the financial risks faced by citizens.


This course will require students to review and discuss certain case law, as in many law school courses. It will also require students to review certain statutes and to acquire a facility in the analysis of statutes separately from case law. And it will require students to examine certain executive orders and the history of such orders. Some of the evaluation of each student's performance will be based on one or more short papers assigned during the term, and some will be based on a final examination. (Herbert)

According to the National Center for Children in Poverty, children are disproportionately impacted by poverty, especially children of color and immigrant children. These risks are greatest for children who experience poverty when they are young and/or experience deep and persistent poverty. This course concerns those areas of civil law which most affect low income children and families, including public benefits such as welfare, housing, education, and health care. Other systemic issues will be explored, such as wealth discrimination, use of legal remedies to promote social change, and the delivery of legal and other services to children.

Skills

This is an advanced seminar intended to give students a working familiarity with the anatomy of a commercial real estate sale, using a case study and typical documents, and provide a real-world introduction, from a practitioner's perspective, to: (1) the substantive law that applies to commercial real estate (and mortgage financing); (2) the business objectives of buyers and sellers as they analyze and negotiate purchase documents, conduct due diligence (survey, title and environmental, etc.) and negotiate mortgage loans; and (3) the mechanics of closing the deal. The course will focus on Illinois law, but the instructor will point out points on which state law may differ, and how that might affect the deal terms. The “text” for the course consists of a portfolio of legal documents (letter of intent, purchase agreement, brokers agreement, title report, survey, mortgage documents and all closing documents – deeds, assignments, affidavits, escrow instructions, etc.) In addition to the actual documents, course reading materials will include excerpts from statutes, treatises, practitioners' guides, and, occasionally (but rarely), court cases. The goal of the proposed course is to provide as nearly as possible, given the constraints of a classroom setting, the quality and substance of the experience a first-year associate would ideally have in a law firm in reviewing, negotiating and drafting a purchase agreement and closing documents, conducting due diligence (emphasis on title and survey) and quarterbacking the closing, all under a supportive, mentoring partner (i.e., the instructor). Students will volunteer to be seller’s counsel or buyer’s counsel. For the duration of the course, students will review, analyze and participate in discussions from their chosen perspectives. The culmination will be a mock closing, with a couple of last-minute surprise glitches to keep things interesting.

Prerequisites for the course are Contracts and Property. Students who have taken courses in Real Estate Law, and/or Secured Transactions would be at an advantage.

Skills

The purpose of this course is to develop an understanding of human behavior in changing organizations, and the managerial awareness, tools and methods that are available to increase effectiveness. The course surveys principles and theories about individuals and groups at work, motivation and interactive drives and processes for satisfying needs, organization strategies for effectively utilizing people and creating the environment to achieve goals of people and companies. New models of leadership, teams, organization structure are studied as the product of today’s transforming organizations. Some elements of organization development methods are incorporated to show how OD practitioners work.

One of the distinguishing features of the Online MJ in Children’s Law and Policy is its focus on the development of leadership skills for child advocates across a range of disciplines and organizations. This required cornerstone course begins with an introduction to different types and styles of leadership before turning to a more practice-based preparation for leadership in such areas as operations, human resources, finance, and communications.

In this course, students will explore the regulatory and civil practice laws governing electronic health information. The course will include a brief overview of the political and social forces behind the digitization of electronic health information. Students will learn the relevant legal definitions and terms associated with electronic health information and the obligations imposed upon healthcare providers who create, manage and store electronic health data. The course will include in depth analysis of the statutory requirements governing e-health information, such as the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure and the HITEC Act of 2009. Materials will include relevant journal articles, statutes, and case law. Upon completion of the course, students will understand the issues faced by healthcare providers with the explosion of electronic health data, the legal obligations of healthcare providers, and how to develop a legally sound e-health information program. THIS CLASS IS ONLY AVAILABLE ONLINE AND WITH PERMISSION.

Skills 

May count as Experiential Learning with instructor approval.

The legal issues surrounding student discipline in public elementary and secondary schools involve the intersection of Constitutional and statutory law with the administrative hearing process. By developing a working knowledge of the school disciplinary process, course participants will build analytical and substantive skills applicable to a wide variety of practice areas.

The course will address the Constitutional implications of student discipline and the statutory provisions governing student discipline and the administrative hearing process. Students will learn about ‘zero tolerance’ policies, the role that school discipline plays in the ‘school-to-prison pipeline,’ and the discriminatory impact of school discipline policies. Issues relating to discipline in charter schools and discipline of students with disabilities will also be addressed. Other topics to be discussed include disciplinary-related challenges that arise in the context of protecting vulnerable children, including issues of harassment and bullying of LGBT and special needs children; and the legal tenets governing school districts’ responses to cyberbullying and the rise of social networks and digital media. Emerging trends in alternatives to punitive school discipline practices, such as human rights approaches, positive behavior interventions and supports, and restorative justice, will be examined.

Throughout the term, students will engage in hands-on learning activities, interactive exercises, and practical applications of the concepts and principles of the course. The culminating experience of the course will involve participation in a simulated student disciplinary hearing.

Experiential Learning Opportunity:

With instructor approval, a limited number of students taking the course will have the opportunity to serve as advocates for students facing expulsion from public schools. Students will work under the supervision of the course’s faculty to conduct client intakes, develop a defense strategy, conduct discovery, prepare witnesses, and advocate for students at a school expulsion hearing. Students may serve in this capacity as part of the course or for an additional credit, and they may earn Experiential Learning credit. Instructor permission is required to enroll in this portion of the course, and preference will be given to 2L students (no 711 license required). If you are interested in enrolling in this portion of the course, please contact Kathleen Hirsman at khirsman@luc.edu and Miranda Johnson at mjohnson11@luc.edu as soon as possible.

This course is required for international students in the LL.M. in U.S. Law or the LL.M. in International Law.

During the fall semester, students take Legal Research and Writing I and are introduced to legal research methods and the fundamentals of legal writing.  Students read and analyze legal authority and learn how to apply the legal authorities to particular fact situations.  Through a series of legal memoranda and exam writing assignments, students develop their analytical and writing skills.   Students are taught legal research methods through written exercises, research memos, and lectures.  During the spring semester, students take Legal Research and Writing II which builds on the basic writing, analysis, and research skills learned in the first semester.  In the spring semester, students are also introduced to persuasive writing and learn how to present an oral argument to the court.   Computerized research techniques are included in the course.

This course is required for international students in the LL.M. and U.S. Law or the LL.M. in International Law.

During the fall semester, students take Legal Research and Writing I and are introduced to legal research methods and the fundamentals of legal writing.  Students read and analyze legal authority and learn how to apply the legal authorities to particular fact situations.  Through a series of legal memoranda and exam writing assignments, students develop their analytical and writing skills.  Students are taught legal research methods through written exercises, research memos, and lectures.  During the spring semester, students take Legal Research and Writing II which builds on the basic writing, analysis, and research skills learned in the first semester.  In the spring semester, students are also introduced to persuasive writing and learn how to present an oral argument to the court.   Computerized research techniques are included in the course.

Instructor approval (Brendel/Becker) required.

This course exposes students to seven unique and emerging issues impacting the health care industry. Each issue has the potential to impact providers, health care organizations, health care attorneys, and consumers. Each emerging issue is selected based on its likely impact on the industry and its timeliness, given current political and health care challenges. This course is structured over 14 weeks, in which we alternate between reading weeks, where students are given reading material to introduce them to each issue, and synchronous classroom lectures by national experts on each subject. At the end of the course, each student is asked to write a reflective paper on one of the issues presented and describe the impact that they believe it will have on their practice or the delivery of health care in general. This course is graded pass/fail. THIS CLASS IS ONLY AVAILABLE ONLINE AND WITH PERMISSION.

JD Required

Students read and analyze legal authority and learn how to apply the legal authorities to particular fact situations. Through a series of legal memoranda writing assignments, students develop their analytical and writing skills. Students are taught legal research methods through written exercises, research memos, and lectures. Second semester, the course builds on the basic writing, analysis, and research skills students have learned first semester and introduces persuasive writing skills. Students also learn how to present an oral argument to the court. Computerized research techniques are included in the course. In order to provide significant opportunities for instructor feedback, the first-year writing classes are organized into sections of approximately twelve students. Each section is staffed by both a legal writing instructor and a student tutor. (Brendel, Becker and the Legal Writing Faculty)

JD Required

Students read and analyze legal authority and learn how to apply the legal authorities to particular fact situations. Through a series of legal memoranda writing assignments, students develop their analytical and writing skills. Students are taught legal research methods through written exercises, research memos, and lectures. Second semester, the course builds on the basic writing, analysis, and research skills students have learned first semester and introduces persuasive writing skills. Students also learn how to present an oral argument to the court. Computerized research techniques are included in the course. In order to provide significant opportunities for instructor feedback, the first-year writing classes are organized into sections of approximately twelve students. Each section is staffed by both a legal writing instructor and a student tutor. (Brendel, Perlin and the Legal Writing Faculty)

Non-Graded

Legal Writing tutors work with students in the first-year writing program. They attend all classes of their Legal Writing section, hold regular office hours, and help students develop their research and writing skills. (Perlin).

Instructor approval (Brendel/Becker) required.

This course considers the dominant role state and federal legislation plays in today’s legal system.  Topics covered include legislative theory; key concepts of legislative drafting; sources of legislative uncertainty; the changing theories, tools (including the oft-maligned canons of statutory interpretation), and practices of statutory interpretation; and the role of courts in interpreting statutes.  The greatest part of the course will focus on matters of statutory interpretation including the tools courts rely upon to when interpreting statutes. (Simoni)

This course introduces students generally to the legislative process and more specifically to federal and state laws and policies that affect children and families. Students will have an opportunity to draft model legislation, critique existing or proposed legislation, and learn techniques for educating lawmakers and policies makers about children’s needs and the importance of research and data in formulating child-centered and effective laws and policies.

Skills

This class will provide an in-depth exploration of legislative process and procedure on the state level, the legislative institution and the impact of electoral politics on lawmaking. Through the use of case studies and guest speakers who are part of the process, students will learn the many components of lawmaking and how all come together in today’s political culture.

In this course students will take an in depth look at both the substantive and procedural law of medical negligence litigation and alternative dispute resolution. The primary methodologies used in ADR, arbitration, and mediation are reviewed through a series of case examples. THIS CLASS IS ONLY AVAILABLE ONLINE AND WITH PERMISSION.

Experiential Learning

Skills

Few resources exist to assist individuals who have been exonerated after serving time in prison for crimes they did not commit.  Life After Innocence (“LAI”) – the first and still one of the only projects solely devoted to post-exoneration services – provides its student members with unique practical and educational experiences in a clinical classroom setting.

LAI provides a variety of legal and social services to its clients through direct interaction between students and exonerates. Students work together in practice groups to develop practical lawyering skills, acquire a deeper understanding of professional and ethical responsibility, and cultivate an attorney-client relationship in a unique and still emerging area of law. Projects may include obtaining expungement of criminal records, litigating petitions for certificates of innocence, drafting amicus briefs, and engaging with areas of law ranging from family law to criminal procedure. Students also work with exonerees as they procure identification, find housing, search for employment, obtain health services, and learn technological skills. Senior law students eligible for a 711 license may actively participate in court proceedings and draft legal documents under the supervision of LAI faculty members.

A weekly two and a half hour class meeting simulates the environment of a staff meeting in a small law firm. In addition to attending class, students will commit to performing 4-6 hours of course related work each week. Students will provide a weekly summary of time billed and agree to complete any projects not completed during the semester.

This course serves as an introduction to the growing area of health law known as "life sciences."  The theme for this course centers on the regulatory issues involved in the research, development, and sale of pharmaceutical drugs, medical devices, and biologics and the role of the FDA and other government agencies in regulating these industries.  Topics covered will include the approval process for pharmaceutical drugs, medical devices, and biologics, genomics, personalized medicine, the FCPA, basic patent and intellectual property issues, as well as fraud and abuse and compliance issues for these industries. (Zacharakis)

This course serves as an introduction to the growing area of health law known as "life sciences." The theme for this course centers on the research and development of pharmaceutical drugs and devices and the role of the FDA in regulating this process. Topics covered will include genomics, personalized medicine, the FCPA, basic patent and intellectual property issues, and financing. Students will learn to analyze the FDA approval process. (LLM only or with permission.) THIS CLASS IS ONLY AVAILABLE ONLINE AND WITH PERMISSION.

Skills

This course focuses on ethics and professional responsibility issues specific to the litigation context. It will address the core principles in the Model Rules of Professional Responsibility pertinent to the litigation practice: competence, communication, candor, confidentiality, conflicts of interest and client control. These topics will be considered in a "real world" situation format. In addition, certain practice issues such as engagement letters, fee agreements, termination of representation and disengagement, false testimony or evidence and corrective measures, safeguarding privileged communications and client confidences, multi-jurisdictional practice, supervisory responsibility, lateral mobility, malpractice insurance and professional discipline and other consequences of rules violations or other misconduct will be taken up and discussed. There is a paper obligation and a responsibility to present that paper in class, but no exam. (Wiseman)

Skills

This course will focus on the steps involved in litigating a federal civil case up to trial, including drafting and responding to complaints, motion practice, discovery rules and techniques, including the newly regulated area of rediscovery, presenting evidence to the court to obtain summary judgment and other pretrial procedures highlights include drafting pleadings and memorandum, understanding and applying court procedural rules, and analyzing and presenting the evidence through briefs. This course is designed for those interested in the private practice of civil litigation. (Ross)

Fundamentals of Private Practice is a three-day course geared toward training students in the personal skills, practical skills and business sense required to succeed in a private practice law firm. On the first day of the course, students will acquire general practice skills relevant to all new lawyers – from office demeanor to managing workload to daily verbal and written skills. On the second day, students will be divided into litigation and transactional sections, depending on practice areas of interest. The litigation section will focus on the fundamentals of litigation practice, including research, writing and advocacy skills. The transactional section will focus on the fundamentals of transactional practice, including corporate formation, corporate transactions and associate due diligence. Both sections will culminate in a practical skills assignment, to be completed in advance of the third day of the course. On the third day, the assignments will be reviewed in detail. Students will also learn basic ethical considerations and the skills learned throughout the weekend will be put into practice.

Non-Graded

Professor Geraghty 3 credits
In order to receive the LL.M. degree, each student must write a paper of publishable quality. The paper, written under the guidance of an LL.M. faculty advisor, should integrate a number of issues covered in the ChildLaw curriculum. Each paper is expected to make an important contribution to the literature on child and family law. (Geraghty)

Open to: LLM students. Prerequisites: none. Each LLM student must write a paper of publishable quality. The paper, written under the guidance of a faculty advisor, should integrate a number of issues covered in the health law curriculum. It is expected that each LL.M. paper will make an important contribution to health law literature. (Singer, Blum)

Non-Graded

Open to:  LLM students only with permission. LLM students who do not complete the LL.M. Paper within the requisite period of time must register for this class each semester until the paper has been accepted by the advisor. (Singer, Blum)

Non-Graded

Professor Geraghty 3 credits
LL.M. students who do not complete the LL.M. Paper within the requisite period of time must register for this class each semester until the paper has been accepted by the advisor. (Geraghty)

A review of current ChildLaw practice topics, this course examines problem areas confronted by practitioners. The format alternates between lectures/discussions and problem solving sessions. (Geraghty)

Open to:  LL.M. students only (or J.D. students by instructor permission). Prerequisites: none. This course reviews current health law practice topics and examines problem areas confronted by practitioners. The format varies between practitioner-led discussions and problem-solving sessions. (Singer)

Non-Graded

Open to: LL.M. students only. This course is intended for those students interested in sharpening their tax legal research skills. In addition to reviewing basic tax research, the course covers federal legislative history, administrative research, tax looseleaf services, and other specialized tax research sources, using both traditional materials and computerized resources when appropriate such as the online versions of CCH and RIA. The student is expected to complete a series of weekly library exercises. (Johnson)

Non-Graded

Open to: LL.M. students only. The purposes of this seminar are to develop federal tax research skills, to refine analytical abilities previously developed in earlier federal tax and other law courses, and to improve the legal writing skills of students nearing graduation. The primary goal is to prepare a manuscript of publishable quality with respect to a particular substantive issue in the federal tax field. Students submit an outline and multiple drafts at designated points during the semester and make a presentation at the end. (Kwall)

Each LL.M. student must write a paper of publishable quality. The paper, written under the guidance of a faculty advisor, should integrate a number of issues covered in the health law curriculum. It is expected that each LL.M. paper will make an important contribution to health law literature. Students' papers will be considered for publication in Loyola's Annals of Health Law. (LLM only.) THIS CLASS IS ONLY AVAILABLE ONLINE AND WITH PERMISSION.

Experiential Learning

Non-Graded

This course is the second credit of a two-credit ungraded program.   To prepare for the visit to London, students are required to take Introduction to the English Legal Profession (1 credit) during the fall semester prior to the trip.  Participants are then required to register for this course in the spring semester after the conclusion of the trip to London.  Students are required to submit a 20 page research paper by a deadline in May on a topic approved by the instructor.

Each year, students are selected to travel to London for about two weeks between semesters.  In London, students engage in a number of activities focusing on the British legal professions, the system of advocacy and legal history.  For students who hope to be selected for the program, completion of Trial Practice I is recommended.  Applications for the program are due each April and the program faculty selects the participants for the following year. There are always far more applicants to the program than available space. (Faught)

Skills


This course teaches incoming Loyola students the skills essential for success in law school.  Students will learn how to read cases, prepare for class discussions, and take notes, as well as how to prepare for and answer final examination questions.  Students will also learn fundamental legal writing skills and will draft a legal memorandum.   Oral argument will also be introduced. 

Loyola

SCHOOL OF LAW REGISTRAR OFFICE
Philip H. Corboy Law Center · 25 E. Pearson Street Suite 1203 · Chicago, IL 60611 ·
312.915.7167 · E-mail: law-registrar@luc.edu

Notice of Non-discriminatory Policy