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Loyola University Chicago

Registrar

School of Law

Courses T - Z

Skills

This course covers procedures and strategies for representing clients and resolving Federal civil tax controversies arising from Internal Revenue Service audits and appeals, including litigation. The course also includes a discussion of tax penalty provisions and the ethical issues faced by advisors in structuring tax motivated transactions and resolving tax controversies. (Duhl)

Experiential

Skills

This course offers students the opportunity for a hands-on approach to developing their skills and knowledge of the procedures and dispute resolution strategies involved in federal tax controversies. This intensive course will offer experience with pre-controversy planning techniques such as:  pre-filing motions, conflict resolution with the IRS through both examination and appeals, and preparing for tax court litigation.  Students will be engaged in a series of real-time scenarios for identifying issues, drafting responses and preparing memos related to both corporate and individual tax disputes.

Experienced tax attorneys will guide students through a series of mock procedures and interactions with the IRS, and assist the students in developing and improving their analytical and writing skills. Through a mix of panel presentations and guests lectures, students will gain an understanding of the types of challenges that can arise in the day-to-day world of tax controversy from the perspectives of the tax attorneys and IRS compliance and enforcement specialists.

Provides students with an overview of key legal and policy issues in the diverse and growing field of long term care. In the context of the seminar long term care will be cast broadly as an area that deals with diverse populations that have profound and ongoing health/social needs including disabled populations and the elderly. While much of the course will focus on statutory and regulatory law, significant emphasis will be placed on evolving public policies in long term care that impact programmatic developments in quality assurance ,insurance coverage and the regulation of institutional and community actors. Specific areas of focus will be selected for each term for review and analyses including diseases of aging, prevention of abuse and neglect, uses of telehealth, senior housing policy and end of life care. Materials from the United States, Canada, the EU and Japan will be referenced. Students will be required to write two memoranda and participate in a group project.

JD Required 

Bar

A basic course in the substantive law governing compensation for injuries to property and to the person. Considered are intentional wrongs, negligence, malpractice, products liability and strict liability; invasions of personal integrity and emotional well-being; injury to tangible and intangible rights in property; liability insurance and alternatives; and damages. Other risk-bearing alternatives are considered and contrasted with the traditional common law theories. (Appel, Cooper, Frischmann, Locke, Sawicki)

This course will provide an overview of the law of toxic torts. Toxic torts is the area of law dealing with injuries due to exposure to hazardous chemical and other substances. This is an emerging area of law that will likely remain active in our industrial society. It is also an area of law were the young lawyer can with an understanding of key concepts have an advantage over older attorneys. This course will provide an understanding of the key concepts of toxic tort law. However, in addition to learning about toxic tort law, the student will learn secrets that have application in personal injury litigation outside of toxic torts. For example, how can you use the choice of a medical expert’s stethoscope to impeach his testimony? What hidden clues are in an expert’s curriculum vitae (resume)? What logical flaw can be used to discredit paternity testing results? Why are most physicians not qualified to give an opinion concerning causation and how do you prove it at trial?

The instructor of this course is a physician, attorney, industrial hygienist, toxicologist and a biomedical engineer. In addition to having served as the medical director of a major American city, he is a trial attorney who will share secret knowledge that may make a difference in the trajectory of your career. (Chiodo)

This course builds upon the trademark concepts discussed in the intellectual property survey class. The focus of the class will be an advanced and applied understanding of trademark law. The course will cover various areas of trademark law and practice, including clearance and prosecution of trademarks, as well as infringement, dilution and licensing. The final grade will be based upon class participation, and assignments, including a final project; there will be no final exam. Prerequisite: Intellectual Property or permission of instructor. (Nanette Norton)

Skills

Negotiating Everything – A Transaction Skills Seminar. 
The course will examine the lawyer’s role in business transactions by looking at examples of two decidedly different transactions – the negotiation of commercial real estate leases and the structure of the purchase, ownership, and operation of a corporate aircraft.  The practical skills and knowledge acquired by examining these examples can be applied to virtually all commercial transactions.  The class will consider the art of negotiating those transactions – and will focus on the role of the lawyer in those negotiations.  We will consider a variety of negotiating strategies and how to deal effectively with opposing counsel who may, or may not, share your particular strategy.  In addition, the class will examine a corporate aircraft transaction – with a myriad of parties and opposing interests and regulations - with the goal of appreciating the juggling and balancing necessary to achieve the best result possible.  Along the way we will look at how there is not ONE way to do things, rather there are many ways and many strategies.  The rules and processes taught in law school are there to provide guidance; they are not hard and fast rules about the way that a transaction must be done.  That's one of the benefits of being a transactional lawyer - the rules are set by the parties as they negotiate.
Students will be evaluated on the basis of classroom participation and attendance, a paper, and, in lieu of final exam, a one-on-one negotiation session with the instructor.  Regular attendance is expected; if a student cannot attend class, please notify the instructor.

Perspective Elective

An introduction to the legal aspects of international business. The course emphasizes the legal problems associated with international trade in goods and foreign direct investment, and covers regulation at the private, national, and international levels, and also may include an extended treatment of international litigation problems and/or the role of the multinational enterprise in world business. (Heard, Moses, Walker)

Perspective Elective

This course is designed to introduce 1L students to the many specialized areas that a practitioner of “international law” must consider in an era of globalization.  No prior knowledge of international law is required. The course will discuss situations of current interest in the world, illustrating the inter-relationship of public international law (relations among states, individuals, NGOs and others), the law of international business and finance, comparative law (the common law and civil law traditions), institutions and procedures for the settlement of cross-border disputes, and U.S. law that bears on issues that involve one or more other countries.  Specific topics to be covered will probably include modern piracy, Wikileaks, money laundering, human trafficking, and the like. (Haney)

411- Trial Practice I (3)

Experiential

Skills

This graded 3 unit course offers the opportunity to develop the skills necessary to conduct a trial, including case analysis, opening statements, direct and cross examinations of witnesses, evidentiary objections and foundations for admissibility of evidence, and closing arguments. The student/faculty ratio is 8 to 1. The faculty rotate among the student groups and each student is given the opportunity to perform the exercises necessary to learn the skill. Each student is paired with a partner and required to conduct a bench trial and a jury trial during the course of the semester. Prerequisite:  Evidence

416- Trial Practice I (Intensive) (3)

Experiential

Skills

This intensive eight day course is offered only in January and instructor permission is required for enrollment. This graded 3 unit course offers the opportunity to develop the skills necessary to conduct a trial, including case analysis, opening statements, direct and cross examinations of witnesses, evidentiary objections and foundations for admissibility of evidence, and closing arguments. The student/faculty ratio is 8 to 1. The faculty rotate among the student groups and each student is given the opportunity to perform the exercises necessary to learn the skill. Each student is paired with a partner and required to conduct a bench trial and a jury trial during the course. Prerequisite:  Evidence

Experiential

Skills

This graded 3 unit course offers the opportunity to build upon the basic trial advocacy skills developed in the Trial Practice I course through in-depth case analysis and strategy, advanced direct and cross examination including expert witnesses, and use of the written and oral motions in limine to support the basis for evidentiary objections and foundations for admissibility of evidence. The student/faculty ratio is 8 to 1. The faculty rotate among the student groups and each student is given the opportunity to perform the exercises necessary to learn the skill. Each student is paired with a partner and required to conduct a two bench trials and a jury trial during the course of the semester. Prerequisite:  Evidence and Trial Practice I (LAW 411 or LAW 416 or LAW 400 or law 499).

Experiential

Skills

This is a non-graded course that requires instructor permission to enroll. The course is limited to students that are currently enrolled in the LAW 400, 401, or 499. Students are required to prepare and compete in one or more mock trial competitions.  Variable non-graded credit is available from one to three units depending on circumstances as determined by the instructor. 

Skills

Advanced Trial Practice with Courtroom Technology is an advanced trial practice course qualifying for credit towards the advocacy certificate. This three-hour, graded credit course is designed to teach students how to prepare and try cases in a modern environment. Students will learn to conduct dynamic and persuasive courtroom presentations by combining advanced trial advocacy skills with courtroom presentation tools, including Sanction II and PowerPoint. Following several weeks of advocacy and software instruction and workshops, students pair into teams to try multiple, hi-tech, mock trials. Course materials include student licenses for Sanction II. The course will be taught by Assistant United States Attorney Michael Ferrara and plaintiff's attorney Brian Monico (both Loyola alums). Trial Practice I is a course prerequisite.

Skills

This graded 3 unit course requires instructor permission to enroll.  Students develop the skills necessary to conduct a trial, including case analysis, opening statements, direct and cross examinations of witnesses, evidentiary objections and foundations for admissibility of evidence, and closing arguments. Students are required to participate in the mandatory evidence boot camp at the start of the semester. Each student is required to apply their learned skills in one or more local, regional, national or invitation mock trial competition. This course satisfies the requirements of Trial Practice I (LAW 411 or LAW 416).

Either as transactional lawyers or as litigators, you are more likely to find yourselves working with unincorporated business entities than corporations. What are these entities and how do they differ from the corporation? The course briefly reviews all unincorporated entities with special focus on limited partnership (LP), limited liability partnership (LLP) and limited liability company (LLC). First part of the course deals with the legal issues involved in the formation of those entities (choice of form considerations, drafting of the agreement). The second part considers issues encountered in the operation of those entities (inevitable conflicts among shareholders, partners or members, buyout agreements, dissolution of the entity). Students will undertake in-class mock negotiation and mock trial. Grades will be based on participation and on a take-home exercise (Champetier de Ribes-Justeau)

This course treats in depth many aspects of the Sherman and Clayton Acts. Emphasis is placed on an understanding of the policies and objectives underlying the antitrust laws and the extent to which enforcement of the antitrust laws has fulfilled those objectives. Areas examined include monopolies, price fixing, division of markets, exclusive dealing arrangements, boycotts, resale price maintenance, and mergers. Recent trends in sports and health care industry antitrust cases may be discussed. The impact of economic analysis in the antitrust area is also examined.

Experiential
Skills

In this course, students will focus on contract drafting, communications, transactions analysis, matter management, negotiation and client service. We will use simulations, role playing, in-class negotiations and a five week drafting and negotiation lab to introduce you to the basic work of a transactional lawyer. The goal of this course is to offer you a basic primer on the actual practice of transactional law.

Skills

This is a hands-on, participative, skills course in which students will learn how to properly structure and draft basic wills and trust documents, both testamentary and living. Practical tools, such as, engagement letters and client questionnaires, will be discussed and developed to give insight into the active practice of estate planning which the student can use in the work world. Estates is a prerequisite. Estate and Gift Tax is not a prerequisite. Students who take this class may NOT take estate planning. You may take Wills and Trust Drafting OR Estate Planning, but not both. Final grade will be based on class participation and drafting assignments over the course of the semester. Class size is limited to 16.

Skills

Women & Leadership is a one credit, seven week seminar course for law students that examines the obstacles (internal and external) that prevent women from reaching leadership positions in proportional numbers. Over the course of seven weeks, students engage in dialogue in response to assigned readings and self-assessment tools.  Students also hear from female leaders working in different areas of legal practice who will discuss their experiences and the decisions that helped shape their careers. Grading is based on participation and a final paper. 

Students will review basic writing mechanics including grammar and punctuation. They will enhance their writing skills by editing passages, producing written assignments, and doing focused writing exercises. Students will also learn to develop sound arguments by practicing the art of logical flow. The goal is to help students to produce clear, well-organized, grammatically correct prose. This course will also focus on how to approach the master's thesis. THIS CLASS IS ONLY AVAILABLE ONLINE AND WITH PERMISSION.

Experiential Learning
Skills


This weekend course is designed to provide students with an overview of the issues and case law related to wrongful convictions. Students will gain an understanding of the dynamics of wrongful convictions and this burgeoning area of law. The course will also provide the opportunity for each student to research one recent case of wrongful conviction. 40% of the grade in this course is based on class participation. 60% is based on a research paper.

Loyola

SCHOOL OF LAW REGISTRAR OFFICE
Philip H. Corboy Law Center · 25 E. Pearson Street Suite 1203 · Chicago, IL 60611 ·
312.915.7167 · E-mail: law-registrar@luc.edu

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