Loyola University Chicago

Mathematics and Statistics

Features Archive

Students Present Research

Research Symposium

The Department of Mathematics and Statistics is proud to have had a number of students participate in the Graduate and Undergraduate Research Symposiums. Students' research had a variety of focuses. While some undergraduates focused on their second majors such as physics, psychology, and chemistry, others had projects on pure math such as combinatorics. The 6 graduate student presenters were applied statistics students that used the skills developed from their classes to model real-world problems. Take a look at the photos of our students participating in the Weekend of Excellence.

Congratulations to all of the students that participated and their amazing research!

Some of the Mathematics/Statistics Students and their Presentations

Graduate

Sean McCarthy- "All Models are Wrong, Some are Useful: Mixed Effects Models for Biological Data"

Merjean Pobud- "Predicing the Space-Time Distribution of Atlantic Seabirds"

Hunyang Cho- "Comparison of How Different Tuning Parameters affect Prediction Accuracy and Alternative Ways of Measuring Prediction Accuracy"

Fan Yang- "CriteoLabs Display Advertising Challenge"

Alex Kuang- "Non-Parametric Spatial-Temporal Model for Alien Red Bananas"

Undergraduate

Dan Zimmerman- "Photometric Classification of Supernovae"

George Seelinger- "Diagram Algebras: Combinatorics and Idempotents"

Alex Gilman- "Shocks and Patterns in Vertically Oscillated Granular Systems"

Alex Rix- "How does Current Distribute on a Two Dimensional Plate?"

John Kusner- "Designing Novel Iodine Catalysts to Perform Enantioselective Dearomatization of Phenolic Substrates at the Para Position"

 

  • Departmental Graduation Reception

    As we come to the close of the academic year it is time to recognize our graduates, and all of our students' outstanding achievements! Take a look at the Pictures and Departmental Awards from the Reception!
  • Graduate Student Sean Mc Carthy awarded with the REM Fellowship

    Congratulations to Sean Mc Carthy for receiving the award of a Research Experience for Master's Programs Fellowship for Spring 2015.
  • From the Blog

    Heads-up-Limit Hold’em Poker is Solved

    We have long been wondering about the day computers can match the power of the human mind. Are we there yet? No. Not even close. But we have gotten one step closer with this recent development by Dr. Bowling’s research team at University of Alberta and their computer Cepheus. Computers have long been able to beat humans in […]
  • Statistics Career Night

    The Department of Mathematics and Statistics recently hosted a career night and pizza party for undergraduate and graduate students interested in statistics careers.
  • From the Blog

    The Universal Machine

    With the recent release of the film, The Imitation Game, a wide audience has learned of the immense mathematical accomplishments of Alan Turing. The Academy Award nominated film focuses on breaking the system the Germans used for encrypting vital messages during WWII called the Enigma. The actual title of the film, however, refers to Turing’s […]
  • Michael Godinez: Internship Profile

    Read about one of our undergraduates who was featured in the recent Loyola Magazine!
  • From the Blog

    A Taste of Math

    One of the many places that mathematics shows up in our everyday lives is in cooking. Basic mathematics appears in the measurement of ingredients and conversions of cups to pounds or ounces to tablespoons. A stripped-down recipe is nothing more than a ratio. Take a shortbread cookie for example; the ratio is 1 part sugar […]
  • Congratulations Hunyong Cho on Winning the Mini-Hackathon!

    On Friday October 17th, Loyola held its first Mini-Hackathon. Statistics graduate student, Hunyong Cho, was the winner!
  • From the Blog

    A Mathematical Way to Find Your Spouse

    Have you ever wondered about the ideal age to get married? Perhaps you are curious about how many people you have to date before you find “the one.” Interestingly enough, mathematicians think about this problem and have developed a formula that will give a person a chance at happiness, or maybe just a chance at […]
  • Women in Mathematics and Statistics Visit the Theater

    The Women in Mathematics and Statistics went to Loyola's production of "Proof" to enjoy a Tony Award winning play featuring the subject of mathematics.
  • Profile

    Welcome New Faculty

    The Department of Mathematics & Statistics continues to grow. Join us in extending a heartfelt "welcome" to our new faculty when next you see them [...]
  • Statistics and Sports

    The hockey season just began and it is a perfect time to see how statistics relates to the sport.
  • First Undergraduate Colloquium of the Year

    Bridget Tenner of Depaul University was the first speaker in the undergraduate colloquium. She spoke of the "non-messing up" property.
  • Welcome New Graduate Students!

    At the first Math/Stat Tea of the semester, new graduate students were able to meet their professors and learn more about their specific programs.
  • Mathematics Careers Rank Top 4 in Best Jobs List

    Mathematics students around the country have gained assurance that they are going into a great field. A recent report from CareerCast put Mathematics careers in the top four spots for the best jobs for 2014.
  • From the Blog

    Iranian Mathematician is First Female Fields Medalist

    For the first time in its 78-year history, a woman has won a Fields Medal, mathematics’ equivalent to the Nobel Prize. The International Congress of Mathematics recognized Stanford University mathematics professor Maryam Mirzakhani for her work on the geometry of Riemann surfaces. More specifically, Mirzakhani has looked into “moduli spaces,” or how a Riemann surface […]
  • From the Blog

    Mathematics, Magic, and Mystery

    This is the centennial year of much beloved Martin Gardner’s birth. In honor of this great puzzlemeister and mathematics popularizer, the theme for this year’s Math Awareness Month is “Mathematics, Magic, and Mystery.” What is your favorite mathematical puzzle? I’d love to hear it—and will collect the results in a subsequent post in April.
  • Departmental Graduation Reception

    As we come to the close of the academic year it is time to recognize our graduates, and all of our students' outstanding achievements. Attend the Department Awards Reception on April 30.
  • HS Math Contest at Loyola

    The Department of Mathematics and Statistics at Loyola University Chicago and the MTA sponsored the annual math contest for the Chicagoland area Catholic High Schools on Saturday, February 8th, 2014. Students from 15 area Catholic High Schools competed on a written test in mathematics. Fenwick and St. Francis were the big winners.
  • Math Club Offers Free Tutoring

    In keeping with the Loyola students' tradition of selfless service, the Math Club has once again decided to offer free tutoring for students in any Math/Stats 100-level course, on Wednesday and Thursday evenings, in Flanner Hall. Navigate to the "Tutoring" page under the "Resources" tab above for more information or to volunteer as a tutor.
  • Celebration of Pi Day

    What did you do on 3.14?
  • Cake and Courses

    The weekly Departmental Tea is being taken over by the Math Club this week. Please join us for free cakes, cookies, coffee, and, most importantly, conversation with your faculty about the department's Fall 2014 course offerings.
  • Quick: What's wrong with this photo?

    It's winter time. Let's talk about snowflakes. Did you ever make paper snowflakes in elementary school? [...]
  • Conference Announcement

    AlGeCom Day 9

    AlGeCom Day is a one-day informal meeting of mathematicians from nearby universities in Illinois and Indiana, with interests in Al[gebra], Ge[ometry] and Com[binatorics] (widely interpreted). The 9th installment will be hosted at Loyola University Chicago on November 9th. Come see what's happening in modern algebra, geometry, and combinatorics research.
  • Robert Eisenberg Lecture

    Robert Eisenberg (Rush Medical Center) will be the keynote speaker at this year's Science Week.
  • We've Moved

    This summer, the department said "goodbye" to Loyola Hall and moved to our new space at the corner of Sheridan and Kenmore. We are now housed on the fourth, fifth, and sixth floors of BVM Hall, sitting [...]
  • Math Club Event

    Rubik's Cubed

    Math Club teaches Loyola faculty and students how to solve Rubik's Cube.
  • Profile

    Welcome New Faculty

    The Department of Mathematics & Statistics continues to grow. Join us in extending a heartfelt "welcome" to our new faculty when next you see them [...]
  • Loyola Faculty Honored

    The Special Semester on Game Theory and Partial Differential Equations at the Mathematics Research Center (on the campus of the University of Pittsburg) has invited Dr. Robert Jensen to give a week-long graduate course on "Singular Perturbations of PDEs and Games." The Special Semester on Automorphic Forms, Combinatorial Representation Theory, and Multiple Dirichlet Series at ICERM (the newly created MSRI at Brown University) has invited Dr. Peter Tingley to give a lecture on "Crystals and (Affine) MV Polytopes."
  • From the Blog

    Undergraduate Teaching Colloquium

    This Thursday, David Bressoud will speak about preliminary results obtained from the largest calculus survey ever undertaken. I do hope you can attend the talk. There will be a reception immediately afterwards (Loyola Hall, Seminar Room) to keep the conversation going. All are welcome!
  • How did you celebrate Pi Day?

    What did you do on 3.14?
  • From the Blog

    Nobel winner says maths counts

    Mathematics is one of the most important subject that we teach in school.  The high-tech jobs of the future will require mastery of not only elementary subjects like algebra and geometry, but of advanced mathematical topics like calculus, discrete mathematics, and statistics.  If mathematics is truly that crucial for finding a well-paying job in the […]
  • Special Colloquium

    Special Lecture on q-Counting

    Richard Askey delivers lecture on q-extensions of binomial coefficients, the gamma function, and more.
  • Math Club Event

    Loyola Cubed

    Math Club teaches Loyola faculty and students how to solve Rubik's Cube.
  • Special Colloquium

    Special Lecture on Geometry and Math Education

    Zalman Usiskin delivers lecture on the shape of geometry in the high school curriculum
  • From the Blog

    Dangerous Intersection

    Catastrophe theory is a subbranch of an area of mathematics called bifurcation theory, which itself is a subdiscipline of dynamical systems theory.  Catastrophe theory was founded by the famous French mathematician Rene Thom (1923 – 2002) in the late 1960’s, and became very popular in the 1970’s.  Catastrophes are essentially bifurcations (or splits) between points […]
  • Literary Takes on Mathematical Intuition

    In the very excellent (stats centric) blog Quomodocumque, we find a nice quotation from David Foster Wallace about mathematical intuition, which he compares to James Joyce’s heady notion of epiphany and Yeats' "the click of a well-made box."
  • Pop Quiz: Is Algebra Necessary?

    Andrew Hacker is "dead wrong"
  • From the Blog

    Computer Proof of Feit-Thompson Theorem

    The Feit-Thompson Theorem is the result that every group of odd order is solvable. The original proof was 255 pages!
  • Statistics2013

    Throughout 2013, participating organizations from over 108 countries will promote the importance of statistics to the scientific community, business and government data users, the media, policymakers, employers, secondary school and college students, and millions of people like you. Many participating organizations are planning seminars, media outreach, and [...]
  • MPE2013

    Our planet is the setting for dynamic processes of all sorts, including the geophysical processes in the mantle, the continents, and the oceans, the atmospheric processes that determine our weather and climates, the biological processes involving living species and their interactions, and the human processes of finance, agriculture, water, transportation, and energy. The challenges facing our planet and our civilization are multidisciplinary and multifaceted, and the mathematical sciences play [...]

Target New Transitions Hiring

Congratulations to Professors Marian Bocea and Peter Tingley

Professor Gregory J. Matthews Wins Kaggle Competition

Tea with the Women of the Math/Stat Department

Professors Receive Funding to Run Math Teachers' Circle

Math Teacher Circle

Loyola Professors Marian Bocea and Peter Tingley have been awarded $2,000 from the American Institute of Mathematics to continue running the first math teachers’ circle in Chicago.

The circle is part of a national project that brings K-12 math teachers and college professors together to build connections, work on challenging math problems, and bridge the gap between school and university mathematics education. There are over 60 different circles nationwide, but the Chicago circle is only the second in the state.

 “We all believe that teaching problem solving and critical thinking skills is fundamental to the mission of the math department and to Loyola in general,” Professor Tingley said.  “We also believe that this mission goes beyond the university, and is best achieved through cooperation with the community, and in particular with CPS teachers.”

Professor Tingley and Bocea recently held the first meeting at Loyola, where 12 Chicago Public School math teachers were in attendance, along with two math education students. 

Professors Receive Funding to Run Math Teachers' Circle

Math Teacher Circle

Loyola Professors Marian Bocea and Peter Tingley have been awarded $2,000 from the American Institute of Mathematics to continue running the first math teachers’ circle in Chicago.

The circle is part of a national project that brings K-12 math teachers and college professors together to build connections, work on challenging math problems, and bridge the gap between school and university mathematics education. There are over 60 different circles nationwide, but the Chicago circle is only the second in the state.

 “We all believe that teaching problem solving and critical thinking skills is fundamental to the mission of the math department and to Loyola in general,” Professor Tingley said.  “We also believe that this mission goes beyond the university, and is best achieved through cooperation with the community, and in particular with CPS teachers.”

Professor Tingley and Bocea recently held the first meeting at Loyola, where 12 Chicago Public School math teachers were in attendance, along with two math education students. 

PuzzleHunt 2015

Loyola Mini-Datafest Competition

Post-Loyola Mini-Datafest Competition

Congratulations to the following winners of this year's Loyola Datafest.

1st: Hunyong Cho and Byunghwe Ahn (The Random Duo)

2nd: Igor Schneider and Gabriela Nubling (Brazilian Miners)

3rd: Jessica de la Cruz and Robert Martinez (Shining Force)

Out of the 12 registered teams (Team Catnip, The Random Duo, Pichleap, Immortal, Cannonball Run, Wang, Shining Force, Patrick, Raed, Aziz, Brazilian Miners, and Can We Do Better) these three winning teams scored highest.

This year, our winners predicted how many people would use a city bike share program at any given moment, using 2 years worth of ridership data. Details are available from the original kaggle competition website. Such analytics help bike share programs, like Chicago's Divvy program, move bikes between stations more efficiently - so you always have a bike available and empty spaces to park one.

Congrats to the winners, and thanks to everyone who participated!