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Undergraduate Studies Catalog

THE SCHOOL OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION

Water Tower Campus:
25 E. Pearson, Room 1460
Phone: 312-915-6113
www.luc.edu/sba

Enrique Venta, B.S., M.S., Ph.D., Dean

Mary Malliaris, B.S., M.S., Ph.D., Associate Dean

John Kostolansky, B.B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Associate Dean

Susan Ries, B.A., M.Ed., Ph.D., Assistant Dean, Undergraduate Program

The School of Business Administration provides opportunities for studies and extracurricular activities designed to produce distinctive qualities of mind and character. These qualities include an accuracy of perception, a fund of precise information with focus on a field of interest, a firm grasp of fundamental principles, and a broad sense of intellectual curiosity and resourcefulness. To this end the undergraduate program of the School of Business Administration includes studies in the arts and sciences as well as in business.

In the areas of general education, emphasis is placed upon acquiring facility in both written and spoken communication as well as in mathematics. Knowledge of philosophy and theology is emphasized to develop a sense of perspective and ethical norms. To broaden each studentís perspective of the behavioral, natural, and social sciences, as well as the humanities, elective courses chosen from these fields round out the core studies from the arts and sciences.

Education in business administration and management is designed to provide the student with knowledge of the functioning of a business enterprise. Attention is given to the principles and practices that govern the conduct of the business firm in providing goods and services to customers and consumers. The international dimension of business is woven throughout the business curriculum. Students may earn a concentration in international business as well as study for one or two semesters at Loyolaís campus in Rome, Italy. Condensed two week summer courses in international business subjects are also offered at the Rome campus.

Basic principles of contemporary business are presented through what is called the core program: required foundation studies (analytical and theoretical) in accounting, economics, finance, management, marketing, information systems and operations management, and the legal environment of business.

The School of Business Administration is fully accredited by AACSB, The International Association for Management Education.

OFFICE OF THE DEAN

The office of the dean should be visited for information relating to the School of Business Administration. The initiation of timely class withdrawals, changes in courses, and filing of degree applications are all matters specifically requiring the deanís approval.

Students having any questions or concerns regarding academics should consult with the Deanís office. This includes, but is not limited to, issues pertaining to courses, scheduling, majors or minors. The Deanís office is the primary point of contact for all matters that relate to degree requirements in the School of Business Administration

The deanís office also offers referral assistance and counseling in those matters of personal adjustment which might relate to university life or to the business administration curriculum. Students should consult an advisor in the deanís office when assistance is required in evaluating progress toward meeting the requirements for the bachelor of business administration degree, or in evaluating how transfer credits affect future study plans.

FACULTY POLICIES

At the beginning of each semester each faculty member of the School of Business Administration will provide written policies on such matters as class attendance, submission and grading of written homework, frequency and academic importance of tests and examinations, use of notes and textbooks during examinations, and the basis and methods for determining final course grades.

THE DEANíS ADVISORY COUNCIL

The DAC serves as a formal link between the School of Business Administration and its student body. For example, the council works with the deans to implement various projects. Activities include organizational support of the annual School of Business Administration Honors Convocation and participation in recruiting activities for prospective students.

ORGANIZATIONS AND AWARDS

The university encourages and supports various student organizations and activities which contribute to social and professional student development. All student organizations are advised by the Dean of Student Life Office or a faculty advisor. For further information consult the Dean of Students Office.

Honor Societies and Fraternities
Four university honorary societies and professional fraternities for which business administration students may qualify are:

ALPHA KAPPA PSI. A national professional fraternity founded with the purpose of stimulating and developing scientific research in the field of commerce and business administration.

ALPHA SIGMA NU. Alpha Sigma Nu is the National Honor Society of Jesuit colleges and universities throughout the world. Its purpose is to acknowledge the Jesuit ideals of intellectual excellence, community service and integrity. Invitations to apply for Alpha Sigma Nu are extended to candidates who have demonstrated those Jesuit ideals in their lives.

BETA ALPHA PSI. A national honorary accounting fraternity with membership limited to juniors and seniors in the full and part-time business administration programs. Students must be majoring in accounting, finance or information systems and display high scholastic and personal character requirements.

BETA GAMMA SIGMA. A national scholastic honor society for business administration students. Membership in the Loyola chapter is available to qualified School of Business Administration students.

DELTA SIGMA PI. A national professional business fraternity, organized to promote closer affiliation of business administration students to the business community.

Business Clubs

Accounting Club/IMA Student Chapter. Founded in 1949, the Accounting Club is dedicated to the advancement of the discipline of accounting, to communicating information regarding career opportunities in accounting and related fields to its members, and to the initiation of its members into the business sector. The Accounting Club is affiliated with the Institute of Management Accountants (IMA) and as such was the first student chapter in the Chicago area. As a student chapter, we provide students with the IMAís many resources that are both job related and skill enhancing. Membership is open to business administration students who have successfully completed one course in accounting.

Economics Club. Membership is open to Loyola students who are interested in economics.

Financial Management Association. The association has regular meetings, speakers, tours, and social activities and is open to business administration students who are interested in finance, investments, and entrepreneurship.

Management Club. The student chapter for the Society for the Advancement of Management, an American Management Association affiliate, is open to business administration students. The chapter sponsors speakers, tours, social events, and current management issue conferences featuring local executives.

Information Systems Operations Management Club. This group is open to students who have an interest in information systems or operations management. The chapter has regular meetings, speakers, tours, and social activities. Members are automatically enrolled as student members of APICS, the American Production and Inventory Control Society.

Marketing Club/AMA. The official sponsor of the Collegiate Chapter of the American Marketing Association, the Marketing Club is dedicated to the ethical and professional advancement of marketing theory and practice. The Marketing Club has been nationally recognized as the collegiate sponsor of the AMAís Midwest career forum for the past three years and voted one of the best student organizations on the Water Tower Campus. Membership is open to all undergraduate and graduate students interested in marketing. Interested freshmen and sophomores are particularly invited to participate. Students do not have to be marketing majors to be active in the Marketing Club/AMA. Speakers, forums, workshops, and social activities are just a few of the events sponsored by this organization.

National Society of Collegiate Scholars. A national honorary society that recognizes and celebrates high achievement among first and second year college students in all academic disciplines. The society believes that with scholarship comes a responsibility to obtain leadership and a duty to perform service.

Other Groups
Social fraternities and groups for non-academic activities are listed in the Student Handbook. There are many academic and cultural clubs which serve to further student interest in both curricular and extracurricular university activities. The Student Handbook is published annually and distributed to all students. The various Loyola student organizations and activities are described in the book.

Alumni Association
Graduates and former students of the School of Business Administration who have attended the university for at least one academic year are entitled to alumni standing and membership in the Alumni Association of the university.

Awards for Excellence in Business Administration

Honors Convocation. The annual Honors Convocation, held during each spring semester, serves to recognize the role students fulfill in achieving student academic excellence. Individual recognition is given to full-time students who have earned a 3.5 or better scholastic average while registered in the School of Business Administration for twelve or more hours in each of the two regular semesters immediately preceding the Honors Convocation, and the winners of several school and departmental awards. Some of the awards presented include:

Deanís Key. Ordinarily given to the business administration senior or seniors who, in the estimation of the dean, have made the most outstanding contributions in both leadership and scholarship to the reputation of the school. It is awarded to whomever may be expected in the years after graduation to exemplify, both as citizens and as successful business professionals, the highest ideals of the university.

Honor Keys. Each academic major in the School of Business Administration ordinarily awards one silver honor key annually to the graduating senior who has demonstrated outstanding academic ability in that major field of concentration. Those considered for this award usually will have earned the highest academic average for all coursework in their particular field of concentration.

Other factors such as, but not limited to, leadership achievement, cumulative grade point average, and graduation honors may, at the full discretion of the faculty, be recognized in the selection process.

Scholarship Awards. Certificates of merit are awarded to those full-time business administration students who have distinguished themselves academically by earning a 3.5 or better scholastic average for twelve or more hours in each of the two regular semesters immediately preceding each yearís Honors Convocation.

Leadership Awards. Certificates of merit are awarded to those full-time School of Business Administration students who have distinguished themselves by active and meritorious participation in various extracurricular activities within the university.

Alpha Kappa Psi Scholarship Key. A key which is merited by the senior student in the fraternity in the School of Business Administration who has demonstrated outstanding academic excellence in all undergraduate courses taken at Loyola. Ordinarily this means the highest cumulative grade point average achieved for all courses attempted at Loyola by a student receiving graduation honors.

Delta Sigma Pi Scholarship Key. A key which is merited by the senior student in the School of Business Administration who has demonstrated outstanding academic excellence in all business administration courses taken at Loyola. Ordinarily, this means the highest cumulative grade point average achieved in all business administration courses attempted at Loyola by a student receiving graduation honors.

Patrick Arbor CBOT Scholarship. An alumnus sponsored academic tuition scholarship established by Mr. Arbor when he was the chairman of the Chicago Board of Trade. Designed to assist minority business administration undergraduate students.

Deloitte & Touche LLP Minority Scholar-Intern Program. Combined internship and scholarship available to sophomore and junior minority accounting majors (as well as minority students in their second year of a two-year associates degree program upon acceptance and transfer to Loyola) who have a minimum GPA of 3.0 and demonstrate a strong interest in public accounting as a career.

Carl A. Dorfler Scholarship. An academic tuition scholarship for undergraduate business administration students. Dorfler was a 1949 graduate of the School of Business, and the scholarship was set up in loving memory by his family.

Ernst & Young LLP Endowed Scholarship In Accounting. Merit based unrestricted significant scholarships available to full-time junior and senior accounting majors, who demonstrate strong written, verbal and leadership skills and has an overall and accounting GPA of at least 3.5. These awards are made possible through an endowment funded by the Ernest & Young Foundation.

Sylvester Frizol Scholarship. An academic tuition scholarship in memory of Professor Frizol presented to an outstanding junior business administration student ordinarily concentrating in the field of finance.

Edwin Kerwin Scholarship. An academic tuition scholarship awarded to an outstanding and academically superior senior business administration student concentrating in the field of finance.

Jack Mullins Scholarships. Academic tuition scholarship awards presented annually to a limited number of highly qualified sophomore and junior business school students exhibiting the highest caliber of academic achievement for work completed at Loyola University.

Navistar Scholar Program. Combined internship and scholarship available to minority and women accounting majors who have a GPA of 3.0 and have successfully completed ACCT 304.

James L. Sandner Scholarship. An alumnus-sponsored academic tuition scholarship awarded to transfer students from community colleges.

Martin F. Shanahan Scholarship. An academic tuition scholarship awarded to an academically superior business administration student concentrating in accounting.

Public Accounting Scholarships. Academic tuition scholarships available to accounting majors who present strong academic records. Firms such as Arthur Anderson LLP, Deloitte & Touche LLP, Ernst & Young LLP, KPMG Peat Marwick LLP, as well as alumni make these awards possible.

Deanís List. Each fall and spring semester, the School of Business Administration acknowledges those full-time (12 or more hours) students who obtain at least a 3.5 grade point average for the term. Students on the deanís list receive personal acknowledgement from the dean.

Honors. Academic honors in each major will be conferred on those students who meet the specific requirements for each major within the School of Business Administration. Students seeking honors in their major should consult with the Assistant Dean.

Donald G. Meyer Scholarship. Academic tuition scholarship awarded to a junior business administration student with demonstrated financial need and an outstanding academic record. Donald Meyer was a faculty member in the SBA for more than 30 years and served as Dean of the School of Business Administration from 1977-1995.

Mark & Deborah Essig Scholarship. An alumnus sponsored academic tuition scholarship awarded to a full-time junior or senior business administration student with demonstrated financial need, a Loyola cumulative GPA of at least a 3.0 and a 3.5 GPA in business core classes.

Fr. William Finnegan Scholarship. An alumnus sponsored academic tuition scholarship in honor of a former dean of the College of Arts and Sciences awarded to outstanding business administration students with demonstrated financial need.

John A. Morrisey Scholarship. An academic tuition scholarship awarded to a male business student who is a resident of the metropolitan Chicago area.

Cathy J. and James J. Matuszak Scholarship. An alumnus sponsored academic tuition scholarship awarded to a full time junior or senior business administration student with a Loyola cumulative GPA of at least a 3.0.

Kemper Scholars Grant Program. A grant program offered through the Kemper Foundation that seeks to connect summer business experience with undergraduate academic learning. Each fall one scholar is selected from freshmen applicants on the basis of character, motivation, maturity, academic success and interest in business. The grant includes academic tuition assistance for 3.5 years and internship placement each of three summers within the Kemper Insurance Companies.

GENERAL REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DEGREE

Loyola University Chicago will confer the degree of bachelor of business administration (B.B.A.) upon those candidates who have successfully completed the requirements specified:

Candidates must have been admitted to Loyola University of Chicago with all records from other institutions in acceptable order.

Candidates must have (a) earned the last consecutive uninterrupted 45 semester hours of approved credit in residence in the School of Business Administration of Loyola University, or (b) earned no less than 64 semester hours in residence in the School of Business Administration at Loyola University.

At least 50% of the business credit hours required for the degree must be taken at Loyola University Chicago. (i.e., 27 credit hours for all majors except for accounting majors who must earn 30 credit hours.)

Candidates must have successfully completed and demonstrated acceptable levels of skill in all of the elective and required courses in general education, in professional business education, and in their selected fields of concentration as specified in the requirements of the curriculum of the School of Business Administration.

Candidates must have successfully completed no less than 128 semester credit hours of college-level work. Candidates must have attained a cumulative arithmetic grade point average of no less than 2.00, i.e., "C," for all undergraduate coursework attempted. Students transferring into the School of Business Administration must attain no less than an arithmetic grade point average of 2.00, i.e., "C," for all undergraduate work attempted at Loyola University.

Any student currently enrolled in the College of Arts and Sciences, the School of Education, the School of Nursing, or Mundelein College (except for students pursuing a degree in business) may not take more than 25% (32 hours) or their total hours from courses offered through the School of Business Administration. Any student wishing to take more than 32 hours of coursework from the School of Business Administration will need to pursue a dual degree (see section on dual degrees).

Students are held accountable for meeting the degree requirements in force at the time of their admittance to the School of Business Administration. If formally readmitted to the school, students are accountable for the requirements in effect at the time of readmission. The school reserves the right to make and immediately implement those substitutions in curricular requirements which in its judgment are deemed to be appropriate.

Student eligibility for graduation is determined solely by the Dean of the School of Business Administration. However, it should be understood that each student bears the primary and individual responsibility of determining that graduation requirements have been properly fulfilled. The staff of the deanís office is available to assist students in making this determination. Upon receipt of application for the degree, the deanís office will review and interpret the studentís record in order to determine graduation eligibility.

Dual Degrees
A candidate may elect to earn two undergraduate degrees while attending Loyola University Chicago (e.g. Bachelor of Business Administration and Bachelor of Arts). A candidate must successfully complete a minimum of 160 credit hours. A candidate must see the dean of each college or school in which they are earning a degree for advising and exact degree requirements.

Requirements of Curricula
Students are strongly encouraged to satisfactorily complete the English composition and the mathematics requirements of the program during the freshman year. A minimum grade of "C" is required in each of the composition courses.

In order to graduate from the School of Business Administration, students ordinarily must complete four writing courses. These include: ENGL 105 and 106, or the equivalents; and two writing-intensive courses. ENGL 105 and 106 must be taken in the freshman year, and both must be completed with grades of "C" or better before any writing-intensive course may be taken. In some cases a student may be required to take one or more preparatory courses (e.g., ENGL 100, 102, 103) before enrolling in ENGL 105 and 106.

Writing-intensive courses are designated sections of courses that are taught with a special emphasis on writing. Students in these courses will have a variety of writing assignments that will be integrated closely with the learning objectives of the course.

The purpose of the program is to assure that students continue to give attention to writing as an essential component of education throughout their years at Loyola.

Students should plan ahead, so that they will complete their writing-intensive requirement in a timely fashion. A student should plan on taking two writing-intensive courses in the Arts & Sciences core or else one in the core and one as an elective. In order to assure that training in writing is spread throughout the undergraduate years, the program specifies that no more than one writing-intensive course per semester may be applied to this requirement. Again, the virtue is to plan ahead, because no one wants to be in the position of not being able to graduate because he/she has neglected to complete the writing-intensive requirements.

Transfer students who have completed the equivalent of ENGL 105 and 106 elsewhere may be required to enroll in ENGL 209 or demonstrate proficiency in a written examination. If required, neither the course nor the examination may be deferred. Students assigned to ENGL 209 must complete it with a grade of "C" or better before enrolling in any writing-intensive course.

Transfer students should also consult with the dean about how the writing-intensive requirement applies to them.

Students are also encouraged to satisfactorily complete the mathematics requirements of the program during the freshman year.

All students must complete a major field of study and may choose to complete two or more majors, or a major and a minor.

The seven fields from which to select a single major field of concentration are: accounting, economics, finance, information systems, marketing, operations management, and human resource management. Each student will take specialized studies in a field of concentration during the junior and senior years. In addition, students may earn a concentration in international business. The requirements for a second concentration in international business are listed under Business Administration (BSAD).

The following core courses and their equivalents are regarded as preparatory courses for the appropriate major field or minor field of concentration. To be permitted to proceed in a particular major field of concentration, a student must have received a final course grade of no less than "C" in the core course or courses offered in the major field or minor field departments:

Accounting majors must receive Cís in ACCT 201 and 202.

Economics majors must receive Cís in ECON 201, 202 and 303.

Finance majors must receive a C in FINC 332.

Human resource management majors must receive a C in MGMT 301.

Information systems majors must receive a C in ISOM 247.

Marketing majors must receive a C in MARK 301.

Operations Management majors must receive a C in ISOM 332.

A student may be permitted to qualify for major field selection by repeating the appropriate course or courses. A request to repeat any preparatory course or courses must be made in written form to the dean. All requests subsequent to an initial repetition will be considered only when accompanied by a recommendation from the appropriate department chairperson.

A major field of concentration in the School of Business consists of five advanced courses beyond the core requirements in a department of instruction. The accounting major presents the single exception in that no less than seven advanced accounting courses are required. A minimum of 80% of the major field courses must be approved courses offered and successfully completed at the School of Business Administration of Loyola. A student must attain a minimum arithmetic grade point average of no less than 2.00, i.e., "C," in the courses of the major field of concentration. In addition, in economics, information systems, and operations management, a student must earn a grade of "C" or better in every course accepted for the major or minor.

Curricula for Transferring Students
Students planning to transfer to Loyola Universityís School of Business Administration are strongly advised to review the section "Admission of Transfer Students" appearing in this catalog. Generally, transfer credit will not be allowed for business administration courses taken elsewhere at the freshman or sophomore level if such courses are not offered at the same level at Loyola. In the School of Business Administration, 300-level courses are to be taken by juniors and seniors. These courses usually will not transfer if they are taken as a freshman or sophomore. With respect to non-business administration courses, students contemplating a transfer should review the requirements listed on the pages which follow. Note that non-business administration requirements are stated in some cases in terms of course areas rather than specific courses. Students who intend to transfer to Loyola are strongly urged to visit or call the School of Business Administration for assistance in planning the college work to be taken at Loyola University.

ACADEMIC INTEGRITY

The School of Business Administration is committed to academic honesty. The student should take special note of the section on academic integrity found in this catalog under academic information. The School of Business Administration rigorously enforces the standards detailed in this section.

ACADEMIC STATUS

The following conditions relating to academic status have been adopted by the School of Business Administration to further support and enhance the implementation of Loyola Universityís academic probation and dismissal policy.

A student dismissed for poor scholarship may make an immediate written appeal of the dismissal status to the Dean of the School of Business Administration. Any change of a dismissal status is entirely at the deanís discretion and must be based upon a showing of unusual causative circumstances or events over which the student had little or no control. A written appeal, which is comprehensive, fully explanatory and documented where necessary, must be filed with the deanís office within three weeks of the delivery or attempted delivery to the student of a notification of academic dismissal. Students dismissed for reason of poor scholarship will be readmitted only when satisfactory proof of good academic standing is of record. Students twice dismissed for poor scholarship will not be considered for readmission.

Please contact the Office of the Dean if further information is required.

OUTLINES OF CURRICULA

Each School of Business Administration student must complete the following required business administration courses plus the required courses for one area of concentration. A student may choose to complete the courses for a second area of concentration or for a minor. In addition, a student must complete 54 hours as detailed in the College of Arts and Sciences section.

Required Business Administration Courses
 
Required Credit Hrs.   Dept. Course No. Course Title
3   ACCT 201 Introductory Accounting I
3   ACCT 202 Introductory Accounting II
3   ECON 201 Principles of Economics I (Micro)
3   ECON 202 Principles of Economics II (Macro)
3   ECON 303 Microeconomics1
    AND/OR    
3   ECON 304 Macroeconomics 1
3   FINC 332 Business Finance
3   ISOM 241 Business Statistics
3   ISOM 247 Computer Concepts and Applications
3   LREB 315 Law and the Regulatory 
3   ISOM 332 Environment of Business I
3   MARK 301 Fundamentals of Marketing
3   MGMT 301 Managing People and Organizations
3   MGMT 304 Strategic Management
15   Area of Concentration    
54 Areas of concentration: Accounting, Economics, Finance, Information Systems, International Business, Marketing, Operations Management, Human Resource Management.
1 Economics majors are required to take both ECON 303 and 304; Finance majors must take ECON 303.

Note: Area of concentration and major are used interchangeably in the School of Business Administration.
 
Free Electives
Credit Hrs.

20 Free electives: Any courses from arts and sciences and/or business administration.

Accounting students use 6 elective hours for advanced accounting courses.

128 Total hours required for graduation

REQUIRED COURSES FOR EACH AREA OF CONCENTRATION

Accounting: ACCT 231, 303, 304, 311, 328, and two of ACCT 306, 307, 308, 323, 341.

Economics: ECON 303 AND 304, and four additional economics courses (excluding ECON 350).

Finance: FINC 335, and four of 337, 340, 342, 345, 346, 347, 348, 352 & 353, 355, 395, 398, 399.

Human Resource Management: Five of MGMT 305, 311, 313, 315, 317, 318, 335, 395, 399.

Information Systems: ISOM 345 or 355 or 370, 346, 347, and two of ISOM 345, 348, 349, 355, 370, 397, 393, 395, 398, 399.

International Business: Five of: ACCT 306, ECON 323, 324, 325; FINC 340, 355; ISOM 338; MGMT 305, 315; MARK 341, 363. (2nd major only)

Marketing: MARK 310, 311, 390, and two additional marketing courses (excluding MARK 350).

Operations Management: Required (at least 2) ISOM 337, 338, 341 Electives (at least 3) ISOM 347, 349, 383, 393, 395, 399, ACCT 308, MARK 380, MGMT 335.

Note: Internship courses do not apply to completion of an area of concentration. Internship courses count as free elective credit.
 
Required Arts and Sciences Areas
Each student must take a minimum of 54 hours in the College of Arts & Sciences.
Communicating in Written, Oral & Artistic Forms ó Min. 12 hours required

3 Hours ENGL 105 1 Required

3 Hours ENGL 106 1 Required

3 Hours CMUN 101 Required
 
3 Hours from Communication 101, Classical Studies, English, Fine Arts, Literature, Modern Languages, or Theatre
Moral Reasoning ó Min. 12 hours required

3 Hours PHIL 120 Required

3 Hours PHIL 283 Required

6 Hours Theology Required

Natural Science and Quantitative Reasoning ó Min. 12 hours required. The courses are to be selected from a minimum of two areas (see below).

3 Hours Math131 2 Required

9 hours from Anthropology (101-103), Biology, Chemistry, Computer Science, Mathematics, Natural Science, Physics

Social Analysis in Current & Historical Cultures ó Min. 12 hours required. The courses are to be selected from a minimum of 3 areas (see below).

12 hours from Anthropology (102 or 271), Criminal Justice, History, Linguistics, Political Science, Psychology, or Sociology.

Elective Courses. Min. 6 hours required taken in any area within Arts & Sciences.

Note: The School of Business Administration participates in the Writing Across the Curriculum program. This program requires every student to complete two writing intensive courses beyond ENGL 105 & 106. These courses may be taken in any Arts & Sciences area.

1 English 105 & 106 must be completed with a grade of "C" or better before a student may take a writing intensive course.

2 Students are required to successfully complete MATH 131, Elements of Calculus I or its equivalent. A university administered mathematics placement exam will determine the number of additional prerequisite mathematics courses, if any, and these courses can count towards free elective hours needed in Arts & Sciences. Students receiving AP credit in calculus have satisfied the mathematics requirement.
 
Suggested Curriculum Outline for Freshman and Sophomore Business School Students
Freshman
First Semester Credit Hours Second Semester Credit Hours
ENGL 105 3 ENGL 106 3
MATH 131 or a prerequisite 3 Natural Science and Quantitative Reasoning 3
PHIL 120 3 Moral Reasoning 3
Social Analysis in Current & Historical Cultures 6 Social Analysis in Current & Historical Cultures 3
    CMUN 101 3
Total Hours 15   15
Sophomore      
First Semester Credit Hours Second Semester Credit Hours
ACCT 201 3 ACCT 201 3
ECON 201 3 ECON 202 3
ISOM 247 3 ISOM 241 3
Communicating in Written, Oral & Artistic Form 3 PHIL 283 3
Moral Reasoning 3 Natural Science and Quantitative Reasoning 3
Arts & Sciences Free Elective 3 Social Analysis in Current & Historical Cultures 3
Total Hours 18 18  

Note: Only juniors and seniors will be permitted to enroll in 300-level Business courses.
 
Suggested Curriculum Outline for Junior and Senior Business School Students
All Concentrations Except Accounting
Junior      
First Semester Credit Hours Second Semester Credit Hours
Business Core 1 6 Business Core 1 9
ECON 303 or 304 2 3 Area of Concentration 2 6
Arts & Sciences Free Elective 3 Natural Science and Quantitative Reasoning 3
Free Electives 3 3    
Total Hours 15   18
Senior      
First Semester Credit Hours Second Semester Credit Hours
Area of Concentration 2 6 Area of Concentration 2 3
Free Electives 3 9 MGMT 304 3
    Free Electives 3 8
Total Hours 15   14

NOTE: Only juniors and seniors will be permitted to enroll in 300-level courses.

1 Business Core includes: FINC 332, ISOM 332, LREB 315, MARK 301, MGMT 301.

2 Pay close attention to recommended course schedule and prerequisites for your major. No changes are permitted in requirements for graduation within the major. Economics majors are required to take both ECON 303 and 304. Economics major must earn at least a "C" in ECON 303. Finance majors are required to take ECON 303.

3 Free Electives may be any undergraduate course taught at Loyola University Chicago. This includes the departmental internship (350) courses.
 
Suggested Curriculum for Junior and Senior Business School Students
Concentration in Accounting
Junior
First Semester Credit Hours Second Semester Credit Hours
ACCT 231 3 ACCT 304 3
ACCT 303 3 ACCT 311 3
Business Core 1 6 Business Core 1 3
Arts & Sciences Free Elective 3 Natural Science and Quantitative Reasoning 3
    ECON 303 or 304 2 3
Senior      
First Semester Credit Hours Second Semester Credit Hours
ACCT 328 3 ACCT Elective 3 3
ACCT Elective 3 3 MGMT 304 3
Business Core 1 3 Free Electives 4 8
Free Electives 4 3    
LREB 351 5 3    
Total Hours 15   14

1 Business Core includes: FINC 332, ISOM 332, LREB 315, MARK 301, MGMT 301.

2 Pay close attention to recommended course schedule and prerequisites for your major. No changes are permitted in requirements for graduation within the major. Economics majors are required to take both ECON 303 and 304. Economics major must earn at least a "C" in ECON 303. Finance majors are required to take ECON 303.

3 Accounting electives includes: ACCT 306, 307, 308, 323, 341.

4 Free electives may be any undergraduate course taught at Loyola University Chicago. This includes the SBA internship (350) courses.

5 Accounting majors planning to take the CPA exam are encouraged to take ACCT 306, 307, 323, and 341 although only two are required for the major. In addition, students are encouraged to take LREB 351 although it is not specifically required.

Required Courses For Each Available Minor In The School Of Business Administration

Accounting Information Systems: ACCT 231, ACCT 303, ACCT 308, ISOM 346 and either ISOM 347 or ISOM 393.

Economics: ECON 201 and 202, and four 300-level economics courses (excluding ECON 350).

Information Systems: ISOM 247; two courses (6 credit hours) from ACCT 201, ECON 201, ISOM 332, MGMT 301 or MARK 301; three courses (9 credit hours) from ISOM 345, 346, 347, 348, 349, 355, 393, 397, 398.

Management: Six courses (18 credit hours) from: MGMT 301, 304, 305, 311, 313, 315, 317, 318, 320, 335, 350, 399; ISOM 332, 349, 350, 383, 393, 398; CMAN 368.

Marketing: MARK 301; two courses (6 credit hours) from ACCT 201, ECON 201, ISOM 247, MGMT 301; three 300-level marketing courses (excluding 311 and 350).1

1 Students in the School of Business Administration majoring in a discipline other than marketing may include MARK 311 as one of their upper division marketing electives to satisfy this minor.

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