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Undergraduate Studies Catalog

DEPARTMENT OF CHEMISTRY (CHEM)

MATHEMATICS PREPAREDNESS FOR CHEMISTRY


Students intending to register for a chemistry course will need a background in mathematics that is commensurate with the computational requirements of the chemistry course. Evidence of math preparedness is obtained from results of a Mathematics Diagnostic Test (MDT) administered by the College in conjunction with the Department of Mathematical and Computer Sciences. Students who are found to be mathematically under prepared are required to pass the appropriate course or sequence of courses in mathematics with a grade of "C-" or better before they register for a chemistry course. More information regarding the MDT can be found at http://www.math.luc.edu/academics/mdt/

Department of Chemistry Undergraduate Course Descriptions

101. General Chemistry A. (3)
Prerequisite: A satisfactory performance on the Loyola math proficiency test; a year of high school chemistry is recommended or completion of Math 117 with a grade of C- or better. Co-requisite: 111. Lecture and discussion.
The course deals with the development of basic chemical principles. Topics include atomic and molecular structures, states of matter, energetics and stoichiometry of reactions. For non chemistry majors and students in the B.A. Chemistry program.

102. General Chemistry B. (3)
Prerequisites: 101 and 111, or 105 and completion of Math 118 or higher with a grade of C- or better. Co-requisite: 112. Lecture and discussion.
A continuation of 101. Topics include equilibrium systems, periodic properties, descriptive chemistry.

105. Chemical Principles. (4)
Prerequisites: A satisfactory performance on the Loyola math proficiency test; successful completion of a year of high school chemistry or the equivalent, or completion of Math 117 with a grade of C- or better.
A lecture, discussion and laboratory course for majors. Topics consist of stoichiometry, states of matter, chemical equilibrium, acid/base chemistry and kinetics. The laboratory experimentally illustrates the topics covered.

106. Basic Inorganic Chemistry. (4)
Prerequisite: 105 and completion of Math 118 or higher with a grade of C- or better.
A lecture, discussion and laboratory course for majors that is a continuation of 105. Topics include atomic and molecular structure, periodic properties, and the chemistry of the transition elements. Laboratory involves the techniques and procedures of inorganic synthesis and analysis.

111. General Chemistry Laboratory A. (1)
Co-requisite: 101.
This laboratory course experimentally illustrates the topics covered in the lecture (101).

112. General Chemistry Laboratory B. (1)
Prerequisites: 101 and 111; or 105. Co-requisite: 102.
This laboratory course experimentally illustrates the topics covered in the lecture (102).

151. Elementary Physiological Chemistry A. (4)
Prerequisite: high school chemistry or permission of chairperson.
Lecture, quiz, and laboratory. Emphasis on the development of basic chemical properties and electron configuration, states of matter, gas laws, stoichiometry and energetics of reactions, aqueous equilibria, the use of radioisotopes in medicine, environmental considerations, and an introduction to structure and nomenclature in organic chemistry. Primarily for nursing students.

152. Elementary Physiological Chemistry B. (4)
Prerequisite: 151.
Lecture, quiz and laboratory. Survey of organic chemistry including nomenclature and reactions of functional groups followed by a survey of biochemical topics including stereochemistry, carbohydrates, lipids, proteins, nucleic acids, digestion, metabolism, vitamins, hormones, and blood. Primarily for nursing students.

215. Elementary Quantitative Analysis. (4)
Prerequisites: college algebra; CHEM 102 and 112, or 106.
Lecture, discussion and laboratory. Selected topics in quantitative analysis. For chemistry majors.

221. Organic Chemistry I. (4)
Prerequisite: 106 (preferred), or 102 and 112.
Lecture, discussion and laboratory. An intensive course for chemistry majors using a mechanistic approach. Topics include organic nomenclature, chemical and physical properties and reactions of several classes of aliphatic compounds, stereochemistry and introduction to spectroscopy.

222. Organic Chemistry II. (4)
Prerequisite: 221.
Lecture, discussion and laboratory. Continuation of 221. Nomenclature, properties, reactions and syntheses of further classes of aliphatic and aromatic compounds, carbohydrates and other polyfunctional substances; spectroscopy.

223. Organic Chemistry A. (3)
Prerequisites: 102 and 112, or 106.
Lecture and discussion. First semester of a two semester sequence for non-chemistry majors. A survey of topics including stereochemistry; spectroscopy; and fundamental concepts of organic chemistry. Nomenclature, properties and syntheses of aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons, alkyl halides, alcohols and ethers.

224. Organic Chemistry B. (3)
Prerequisite: 223 or equivalent.
Lecture. Continuation of 223; for non-chemistry majors. Organic chemistry of carbonyl compounds, amines, carboxylic acids and their derivatives, carbohydrates, lipids and proteins.

225. Organic Chemistry Laboratory A. (1)
Co- or prerequisite: 223.
A laboratory course designed to experimentally illustrate the topics correspondingly covered in 223. The experiments acquaint students with the laboratory practices and techniques of organic chemistry and several involve preparation of known organic compounds. For non-chemistry majors.

226. Organic Chemistry Laboratory B. (1)
Co- or prerequisite: 224. Prerequisite: 225.
A laboratory course to experimentally illustrate certain topics covered in 224. The major portion of the laboratory work involves the identification of several relatively simple organic compounds. For non chemistry majors.

300. Undergraduate Research. (1, 2, or 3)
Prerequisites: prior consultation with the instructor and a completed agreement form.
Directed study involving a contractual arrangement between student and instructor for accomplishing a defined research task. Agreement forms may be obtained from the department office, and the completed form (signed by the student, instructor, and chairperson) must be deposited in the chemistry department office before the student can register for this course.

301. Physical Chemistry I. (4)
Prerequisites: PHYS 112 or 114; MATH 162 or 264 or the equivalent.
Lecture and discussion. Mathematical and physical aspects of the behavior of chemical systems, classical and statistical thermodynamics, chemical kinetics, and the properties of matter.

302. Physical Chemistry II. (3)
Prerequisite: 301. Co-requisite: 303.
Lecture. A continuation of 301, including quantum mechanics, molecular structure, spectra, and group theory.

303. Physical Chemistry Laboratory. (1)
Co-requisite: 302.
Laboratory course to experimentally illustrate the principles of physical chemistry and to acquaint the student with laboratory methods.

310. Instrumental Analysis. (ESP 310) (2)
Prerequisites: 215, 302. Co-requisite: 311.
Lecture. Qualitative and quantitative instrumental analysis. Operational theory of instruments, atomic and molecular absorption and emission spectroscopy, electroanalysis, liquid and gas chromatography. This course is offered every other year.

311. Instrumental Analysis Laboratory. (ESP 311) (2)
Co-requisite: 310.
A laboratory course using selected experiments to illustrate the application of instrumental techniques to the solution of chemical problems. This course is offered every other year.

312. Environmental Chemistry. (ESP 312) (3)
Prerequisites: 106 and 106L or 102 and 112.
Sources, reactions, transport, effects, and fates of chemical species in the environment-especially those that are considered to be pollutants are discussed. Current analytical techniques used for determinations of EPA listed priority pollutants. Mechanisms associated with the greenhouse effect, ozone depletion, smog formation, acid rain phenomena, and analysis and disposal of hazardous waste are also presented. This course is offered every other year.

313. Environmental Chemistry Lab. (1)
Prerequisites: CHEM 106 & 106L or 102 & 112.
Co-requisites: CHEM 312.
A laboratory course to experimentally illustrate modern environmental analysis techniques. This course is offered every other year.

340. Advanced Inorganic Chemistry. (3)
Prerequisite: 302.
Lecture only. Modern theories of atomic and molecular structure as applied to inorganic chemistry.

341. Advanced Inorganic Laboratory. (1)
Co-requisite: 340.
A laboratory course designed to experimentally illustrate the topics and techniques met in modern inorganic chemistry. This course is offered every other year.

361. Survey in Biochemistry. (3)
Prerequisite: 222 or 224 and 226.
Lecture. Structural-functional relationships of proteins, nucleic acids and cell membranes; and metabolic pathways.

362. Current Concepts in Bio-chemistry. (3)
Prerequisite: 361. Lecture. FOR CHEMISTRY MAJORS ONLY
Current concepts in biochemistry explained at a molecular level. For each topic covered in the course, an introductory lecture on basic information is given first. About six to ten selected topics are covered.

363. Biochemistry Laboratory. (1)
Prerequisite: 361. FOR CHEMISTRY MAJORS ONLY
A laboratory course designed to experimentally illustrate the principles of biochemistry. This course is for majors only.

380. Chemistry Seminar. (1)
Prerequisite: 222 or 224 and 226. A weekly seminar course. The talks vary over the entire range of chemistry and are generally given by outside speakers.

395. Special Topics in Chemistry. (1-3)
Prerequisite: Satisfactory progress toward completion of the core of chemistry courses, and junior or senior status. Specific titles and contents vary from semester to semester.

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