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Undergraduate Studies Catalog

DEPARTMENT OF MODERN LANGUAGES AND LITERATURES (MDLG)

Lake Shore Campus:
Damen Hall 305
Phone: 773-508-2850
FAX: 773-508-2893

Water Tower Campus:
Lewis Towers 900
Phone: 312-915-6096
FAX: 312-915-8593
www.luc.edu/depts/modern_lang

Professors Emeriti: W. Bowman, Sr., A. Callahan, M. Celeste, Y. Dembowski, G. Denning, L. Fernandez, V. Laube, J. Mouton, M. Robles, J. Wandel

Professors: A. Bugliani, S. Cavallo, P. Giordano (chairperson), D. Heyck, C. Holdsworth, A. McKenna

Associate Professors: S. Corsi, W. Feinstein, O. González, J. Librett, D. Posner

Assistant Professors: F. DiBiagi, G. Sotis, F. Varela-García

Adjunct Professors: E. Odisho, B. Pokrovsky, M. Wolff

The majors in modern languages and literatures are offered at the Lake Shore Campus. Some courses applicable to the majors are offered at the Water Tower Campus.

OBJECTIVES

Knowledge of other languages and cultures greatly enhances cross-cultural and multi-cultural understanding and is an essential occupational asset in an increasingly interconnected world. The aim of the department, in its basic language courses, is to develop fluency in speaking as well as ability in reading and writing the foreign language. Beyond the basic program, students have several options. They may take courses that develop fluency in oral and written expression. They may choose literature and civilization courses to continue the study of a cultural heritage through reading and discussion of original texts. They may enroll in linguistics courses to pursue an interest in the nature and structure of language and its relation to ethnic studies.

CORE AND COLLEGE REQUIREMENTS

French, German, Italian, and Spanish 270 and 271 fulfill core literature requirements. Arabic, Chinese, French, German, modern Hebrew, Hindi-Urdu, Italian, Spanish, Japanese, Polish and Russian I and II fulfill the college foreign language requirement. LING 110, 115, 120 and 125 fulfill the core requirement in social science.

DEPARTMENTAL REGULATIONS

Requirements for Departmental Honors: Students are required to take at least one honors tutorial (399H), in addition to the requirements for a major.

Prerequisites and Sequence of Courses: One year or unit of study of a modern language in high school is considered to be equivalent to one semester or course in college. Students who have had previous study of a modern language may continue the language at Loyola and will be placed in the appropriate course by the department. Courses 101, 102, 103 or equivalents are prerequisites for all courses in the 200-series. Students must earn a grade of "C" or better in 101 prior to enrolling in 102. Courses 270 and 271 are prerequisites for all literature courses in the 300-series. Courses 250 and 251 are prerequisites for advanced language and culture courses and are taken ideally before or at the same time as 270 and 271.

Courses numbered in the 400-series are listed in the catalog of The Graduate School and are open to undergraduate students with the permission of the chairperson.

Advanced Placement Program: Up to six semester hours of credit and exemption from the corresponding college courses will be granted to entering freshmen who have qualified themselves for such advanced placement in the judgment of the department. Credit will in no case be granted for elementary language courses.

Certification Requirements for Teaching French, German, Italian, or Spanish in High Schools: Majors planning to teach are required to take Stylistics (301) or Advanced Grammar (305), Culture and Civilization (390), Linguistics 120 or 125, and Methods of Teaching Foreign Language (LING 302/CIEP M63). For further information on teacher certification requirements, consult page XX in this catalog.

Requirements for the Major in French, German, Interdisciplinary German Studies, Italian or Spanish: Ten courses totaling thirty credits in one language taken in college exclusive of 101, 102, 103, 104, or their equivalents. All majors must take 250, 251, 270, 271 and six courses at the 300-level with the following specific rules for 300-level courses:

French: FREN 301 and 317 plus four electives.

Interdisciplinary German Studies: three of the six 300-level courses may be taken outside the German section in consultation with the major advisor.

Italian: ITAL 312 plus five electives.

Spanish: at least one course in the Golden Age, one in 19th century or 20th century literature and two in Latin American literature.

A senior portfolio is required for majors for program assessment purposes.

DEGREE REQUIREMENTS FOR A MAJOR IN MODERN LANGUAGES AND LITERATURES (B.A.)
 
  Courses Credit Hrs.
Major requirements (as defined above) 10 30
English 105 and 106 2 6
History core 2 6
Mathematics core 1 3
Philosophy core 3 9
Theology core 3 9
Natural science core 3 9
Social science core 2 6
Communicative/expressive arts core 1 3
Electives to complete minimum total of 128 credit hours variable 47
TOTAL    128

Minor in French, Italian or Spanish Language or Literature Minor in a Language. Six courses in French, German, Italian, or Spanish will be selected by the student in consultation with the departmental advisor. Students with no background in a language will begin the sequence with the 101 course in the chosen language. Students with high school or other background in a language will be placed in 102, 103, 104, 250 or 251. Other courses to complete the six course sequence will be chosen from 200 and 300-level language, civilization, literature or linguistics courses, according to the studentís interest and in consultation with the departmental advisor.

Minor in Language and Literature. Six courses in one foreign language excluding 101 through 104. Students normally take 250, 251, 270, 271, and two courses at the 300-level. Students who are fluent in the language may begin the sequence at the 270-level with the chairpersonís permission.

Minor in Literature in Translation. Six courses in literature in translation offered by the Department of Modern Languages and Literatures should be chosen after consultation with an advisor. A maximum of four courses in any one literature will be accepted toward the minor sequence. Courses may be chosen from any of the literature in translation courses offered by the department. (For students who are qualified to take courses in the original language, a combination of courses in the original and in translation will be arranged by the department.)

Minor in Comparative Literature. Six literature courses including two 300-level courses in one literature and three 200 or 300-level courses in another literature. One of these literatures must be studied in the original foreign language. The capstone course for this minor is LITR 391, Topics in Comparative Literature.

Minor in Interdisciplinary German Studies.

  • Minor in German Language (Track I): Six courses in German from 101 through 271, selected by the student in consultation with the German advisor.
  • Minor in Interdisciplinary German Studies (Track II):
A. German Language and Culture: Six courses in interdisciplinary German studies at 250-level and above (of which two may be taken outside the German section in consultation with the German advisor). All 300-level courses include a language component.

B. German Cultural History: In English, five courses in interdisciplinary German studies at 300-level (of which two may be taken outside the German section in consultation with the German advisor), plus GERM 369 (Introduction to German Reading Knowledge).

Internships (French, German, Italian, and Spanish 395). The Department offers supervised field experiences for advanced students who desire on-site experience in a specialized area of interest and the opportunity to further develop language and research skills and to enhance cultural awareness. Placements have included work with the elderly, neighborhood organizations, educational institutions, legal agencies, and business firms.

Summer Study Abroad in France, Italy, and Spain. The Department offers summer study abroad programs in French language and culture at LíUniversité de Provence in Aix-en-Provence, France; in Hebrew language and culture at Loyolaís Rome Center in Rome, Italy; in Italian language and culture at Loyolaís Rome Center in Rome, Italy; and in Spanish language and culture at La Universidad de Alcalá in Alcalá, Spain. Students may take up to six semester hours of credit. In addition to classroom experience, students travel with faculty to visit historic sites. Previous knowledge of a foreign language is not required.

COURSES OF INSTRUCTION

French (FREN)

101. French I.
For students without previous study of the language. Introduction to the basic elements of French that will enable the student to develop communicative skills and a fundamental knowledge of French-speaking peoples, their language and their culture. One additional hour weekly in the language laboratory required.

102. French II.
Prerequisite: 101 with a grade of "C" or better or equivalent, or one year of secondary school training.
Further instruction in basic skills. One additional hour weekly in the language laboratory required.

103. French III.
Prerequisite: 102 or equivalent, or two years of secondary school training.
Intensive review of basic skills to develop audio-lingual facility in communication. One additional hour weekly in the language laboratory required.

104. French IV.
Prerequisite: 103 or equivalent, or three years of secondary school training.
Reading, conversation, and composition based on varied selections from literary and cultural sources. One additional hour weekly in the language laboratory required.

250. Composition and Conversation I.
Prerequisite: 103 or equivalent.
To develop greater fluency in speech and in writing. Conducted entirely in French.

251. Composition and Conversation II.
Prerequisite: 103 or equivalent.
Continuation of 250.

270. Main Currents of French Literature I.
Prerequisite: 103 or equivalent.
Representative works and literary movements from the origins through the eighteenth century. Conducted entirely in French.

271. Main Currents in French Literature II.
Prerequisite: 103 or equivalent.
Continuation of 270. Representative works and literary movements of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries.

300. Tutorial for Credit.
Prerequisite: chairpersonís permission.
Eligible students majoring in French may elect tutorial for credit. Topic chosen in consultation with faculty member.

301. Stylistics.
Prerequisites: 251 and chairís permission.
Problems in writing expository prose; composition and textual analysis.

308. Literary Criticism. (GERM 308) (ITAL 308) (SPAN 308)
Prerequisite: chairís permission.
Introduction to various theories and methods of literary criticism and textual analysis with special attention to historical, theoretical, and structural approaches. Conducted in English.

309. Francophone Literature. (BWS 309) (INTS 309)
Prerequisite: chairís permission.
Study of the literature of Francophone regions in North America, Africa, and the Caribbean.

311. Survey of Twentieth-Century Literature.
Prerequisite: chairís permission.
Study of modern French culture through readings in representative dramatists, novelists and poets: Proust, Claudel, Gide, Colette, Duras and others, including the writers identified with surrealism and existentialism.

314. Survey of Medieval Literature. (MSTU 372)
Prerequisite: chairís permission.
Study of principal literary genres; epic, romance, drama, chronicle and lyricóin their relation to medieval culture.

316. Survey of Sixteenth Century Literature.
Prerequisite: chairís permission.
Study of the literature and culture of the French Renaissance from the Italian Wars to the end of the Wars of Religion. Readings from works of Rabelais, Montaigne and the poets of the Pléiade.

317. Survey of Seventeenth Century Literature.
Prerequisite: chairís permission.
Study of French Classicism through readings in the theater of Corneille, Racine and Molière and in the prose of the "Moralists."

318. Survey of Eighteenth Century Literature.
Prerequisite: chairís permission.
Study of the French Enlightenment as expressed in the writings of Montesquieu, Diderot, Voltaire, Rousseau, Laclos, Beaumarchais, and Marivaux.

319. Survey of Nineteenth Century Literature.
Prerequisite: chairís permission.
The principal aspects of romanticism, realism and symbolism through readings in the novels of Balzac, Sand, Stendhal and Flaubert and in the poetry of Hugo, Baudelaire, Rimbaud and Mallarmé.

320. Survey of Literature of the Theatre.
Prerequisite: chairís permission.
Study of the conventions and innovations characteristic of French theater from medieval plays through the avant garde theatre of the twentieth century.

330. Survey of Poetry, Theory and Practice.
Prerequisite: chairís permission.
Study of French narrative, dramatic, and lyric poetry, with emphasis on the lyric. Special attention to language and image.

340. Survey of Prose, Fictional and Non-Fictional.
Prerequisite: chairís permission.
Study of the novel, the essay, autobiography, and other prose genres from the sixteenth century to the present.

369. Introduction to French Reading Knowledge.
An introduction to French with emphasis on reading expository prose and with the attention to grammar and vocabulary necessary to facilitate reading. Offered for graduate students preparing to satisfy foreign language reading requirements.

390. Culture and Civilization. (INTS 390)
Prerequisites: 251 and chairís permission.
Study of French society as depicted in its literature, film and press.

395. Internship.
Prerequisite: 251 or 252 or fluency in target language and chairís permission.
Supervised field experience and opportunity to apply skills and analysis. Students are required: 1) to spend a minimum of 15 hours per week working in a selected educational institution, community organization, social agency, or business marketing research firm; 2) to meet regularly with an assigned faculty member; and 3) to write reports/papers on their field experience as instructed by faculty member. Placements have included work with the elderly, neighborhood organizations, educational institutions, legal agencies, and business firms.

399H. Honors Tutorial.
Prerequisite: consent of chairperson.
Independent study coordinated with faculty member to integrate directed readings with the studentís special area of interest in major program.

German (GERM)

101. German I.
For students without previous study of the language. Introduction to the basic elements of German that will enable the student to develop communicative skills and a fundamental knowledge of Germanic peoples, their language and their culture. One additional hour weekly in the language laboratory required.

102. German II.
Prerequisite: 101 with a grade of "C" or better or equivalent, or one year of secondary school training.
Further instruction in basic skills. One additional hour weekly in the language laboratory required.

103. German III.
Prerequisite: 102 or equivalent, or two years of secondary school training.
Intensive review of basic skills, to develop audio-lingual facility in communication. One additional hour weekly in the language laboratory required.

104. German IV.
Prerequisite: 103 or equivalent, or three years of secondary school training.
Reading, conversation, and composition based on varied selections from literary and cultural sources. One additional hour weekly in the language laboratory required.

250. Composition and Conversation I.
Prerequisite: 103 or equivalent.
To develop greater fluency in speech and in writing. Conducted entirely in German.

251. Composition and Conversation II.
Prerequisite: 103 or equivalent.
Continuation of 250.

270. Modern German Literature and Culture I.
Prerequisite: 103 or equivalent.
Representative works in literature, philosophy, and fine arts, with sociopolitical backgrounds, 1830-1900: revolutionary post-romanticism, realism, naturalism. Conducted entirely in German.

271. Modern German Literature and Culture II.
Prerequisite: 103 or equivalent.
Continuation of 270. Representative works in literature, philosophy, and fine arts, with sociological backgrounds, 1900-present: neoromanticism, expressionism, literature and fascism, socialist realism, postwar culture in West and East Germany. Conducted entirely in German.

300. Tutorial for Credit.
Prerequisite: chairpersonís permission.
Eligible students majoring in German may elect tutorial for credit. Topic chosen in consultation with faculty member.

301. Stylistics.
Prerequisite: 251 or instructorís permission.
Problems in writing expository prose; composition and textual analysis.

302. Business German.
Prerequisite: 251 or equivalent.
Introduction to the fundamentals of German culture as it relates to business practices. Study of the language of commerce.

308. Literary Criticism. (FREN 308) (ITAL 308) (SPAN 308)
Introduction to various theories and methods of literary criticism with special attention to historical, theoretical, and structural approaches. Conducted in English.

310. Version of the Niebelungenlied: Medieval, Romantic, and Modern.
Introduction to medieval German literature and culture, focusing on the epic poem, the Niebelungenlied. Romantic and modern re-envisionings are studied in drama, opera, fiction, and film, with attention to their conceptual and historical contexts.

320. Survey of 18th Century Literature.
Study of representative works of the Aufklärung, Sturm und Drang, and Classicism. Includes works by Lessing, Wieland, Goethe and Schiller.

325. Romanticism.
Study of major authors associated with the Romantic movement in Germany, including Tieck, Eichendorff, Brentano, Novalis, Heine, E.T.A. Hoffmann.

335. Survey of Early 20th Century Literature.
Study of works by major German and Austrian authors 1900-1933, including Hofmannsthal, Wedekind, Kafka, Mann, Musil, Rilke, and Brecht.

340. Survey of Late 20th Century Literature.
Study of important works by Swiss, Austrian, and German authors of the contemporary period, including Frisch, Dürrenmatt, Böll, Grass, Weiss, Handke, Bernhard and Wolf.

350. Studies in a Genre.
Lyric, prose, or drama representative of the entire German literature.

360. Studies in German Authors.
Goethe, Schiller, Rilke, Brecht, Frisch, Kafka, Grass.

369. Introduction to German Reading Knowledge.
An introduction to German with emphasis on reading expository prose and with the attention to grammar and vocabulary necessary to facilitate reading. Offered for graduate students preparing to satisfy foreign language reading requirements.

370. German Cinema in Socio-historical and Aesthetic Contexts.
Survey of German cinema with focus on classic films of the Weimar republic and the New German Cinema. Analysis of socio-economic contexts and of modes of cinematic representation. Films by Lang, Murnau, Pabst, Herzog, Wenders, Fassbinder, and others.

380. Psychoanalysis and Frankfurt School Cultural Theory.
Culturally and historically oriented introduction to psychoanalysis through major texts by Freud, and to their socio-critical application to cultural phenomena through readings of texts by Adorno, Benjamin, Marcuse, and others.

390. Culture and Civilization. (INTS 393)
Structure of German society as depicted in its literature, with attendant influence on international civilization.

395. Internship.
Prerequisite: 251 or 252 or fluency in target language and chairís permission.
Supervised field experience and opportunity to apply skills and analysis. Students are required: 1) to spend a minimum of 15 hours per week working in a selected educational institution, community organization, social agency, or business marketing research firm; 2) to meet regularly with an assigned faculty member; and 3) to write reports/papers on their field experience as instructed by faculty member. Placements have included work with the elderly, neighborhood organizations, educational institutions, legal agencies, and business firms.

399H. Honors Tutorial.
Prerequisite: consent of chairperson.
Independent study coordinated with faculty member to integrate directed readings with the studentís special area of interest in major program.

Italian (ITAL)

101. Italian I.
For students without previous study of the language. Introduction to the basic elements that will enable the student to develop communicative skills and a fundamental knowledge of the Italian people, their language and their culture. One additional hour weekly in the language laboratory required.

102. Italian II.
Prerequisite: 101 with a grade of "C" or better or equivalent, or one year of secondary school training.
Further instruction in basic skills. One additional hour weekly in the language laboratory required.

103. Italian III.
Prerequisite: 102 or equivalent, or two years of secondary school training.
Intensive review of the basic skills to develop audio-lingual facility in communication. One additional hour weekly in the language laboratory required.

104. Italian IV.
Prerequisite: 103 or equivalent, or three years of secondary school training.
Reading, conversation, and composition based on varied selections from literary and cultural sources. One additional hour weekly in the language laboratory required.

250. Composition and Conversation I.
Prerequisite: 103 or equivalent.
To develop greater fluency in speech and in writing and to deepen cultural and literary awareness. Conducted entirely in Italian. Also offered in Rome.

251. Composition and Conversation II.
Prerequisite: 103 or equivalent.
Continuation of 250. Also offered in Rome.

270. Main Currents of Italian Literature I.
Prerequisite: 103 or equivalent.
Representative works and literary movements from the origins through the sixteenth century. Conducted in Italian. Also offered in Rome.

271. Main Currents of Italian Literature II.
Prerequisite: 103 or equivalent.
Continuation of 270. Representative works and literary movements from the seventeenth through the twentieth century. Also offered in Rome.

300. Tutorial for Credit.
Prerequisite: chairís permission.
Eligible students majoring in Italian may elect tutorial for credit. Topic chosen in consultation with faculty member. Also offered in Rome.

301. Stylistics.
Prerequisites: 251 and chairís permission.
Problems in writing expository prose; composition and textual analysis.

308. Literary Criticism. (FREN 308) (GERM 308) (SPAN 308)
Prerequisite: chairís permission.
Introduction to various theories and methods of literary criticism and textual analysis with special attention to historical, theoretical, and structural approaches. Conducted in English.

312. Dante: The Divine Comedy. (CATH 312) (MSTU 364)
Prerequisite: chairís permission.
Reading of The Divine Comedy and study of Danteís minor works as they relate to his masterpiece.

314. Survey of Thirteenth and Fourteenth Century Literature. (MSTU 368)
Prerequisite: chairís permission.
Beginning of the literary tradition in the Italian language. Early lyric poets, Petrarch and Boccaccio.

315. Italian Renaissance Literature.
Prerequisite: chairís permission.
Study of major Renaissance authors such as Machiavelli, Castiglione, Ariosto and Tasso in relation to the flourishing of the figurative arts and to historical turmoil.

318. The Literature of the Risorgimento and the Late 19th Century.
Prerequisite: chairís permission.
Study of the literature of the century in which Italy became a unified nation. Authors to be studied include Leopardi, Manzoni, Verga and DíAnnunzio.

319. Twentieth Century Novel.
Prerequisite: chairís permission.
Principal authors and literary movements affecting the cultural history of the period.

320. Twentieth Century Poetry.
Prerequisite: chairís permission.
Poets of the Twilight, Futurist, Hermetic, and Feminist currents, as well as other major contemporary poets.

331. Italian Theater.
Prerequisite: chairís permission.
Development of the Italian theater from the early religious plays, through Renaissance comedy, the commedia dellíarte, the plays of Carlo Goldoni to the contemporary stage.

340. The Short Story in Italian Literature.
Prerequisite: chairís permission.
The course traces the development of the short story (novella) in Italy from its earliest manifestations in the novellino to the present. Representative works from major authors.

390. Culture and Civilization. (INTS 394)
Prerequisite: chairís permission. Prerequisite: 251.
Study of the shaping of contemporary Italian society, politics, and culture through analysis of texts, films, and other relevant materials.

395. Internship.
Prerequisite: 251 or 252 or fluency in target language and chairís permission.
Supervised field experience and opportunity to apply skills and analysis. Students are required: 1) to spend a minimum of 15 hours per week working in a selected educational institution, community organization, social agency, or business marketing research firm; 2) to meet regularly with an assigned faculty member; and 3) to write reports/papers on their field experience as instructed by faculty member. Placements have included work with the elderly, neighborhood organizations, educational institutions, legal agencies, and business firms.

398. Senior Seminar.
Prerequisite: chairís permission.
Intensive study of a period, genre, theme, or critical issue. Topics are announced when the course is offered.

399H. Honors Tutorial.
Prerequisite: consent of chairperson.
Independent study coordinated with faculty member to integrate directed readings with studentsí special area of interest in major program.

Spanish (SPAN)

101. Spanish I.
For students without previous study of the language. Introduction to the basic elements that will enable the student to develop communicative skills and a fundamental knowledge of Hispanic peoples, their language and their culture. One additional hour weekly in the language laboratory required.

102. Spanish II.
Prerequisite: 101 with a grade of "C" or better or equivalent, or one year of secondary school training.
Further instruction in basic skills. One additional hour weekly in the language laboratory required.

103. Spanish III.
Prerequisite: 102 or equivalent, or two years of secondary school training.
Review of the basic skills, to develop audio-lingual facility in communication. One additional hour weekly in the language laboratory required.

104. Spanish IV.
Prerequisite: 103 or equivalent, or three years of secondary school training.
Further review of the basic skills. Reading, conversation, and composition based on varied selections from literary and cultural sources. One additional hour weekly in the language laboratory required.

190. Spanish for Nurses I.
Prerequisite: 102 or equivalent, or two years of secondary school training.
A course specifically designed for nurses. Goals: review of basic skills and study of medical terminology. One additional hour weekly in the language laboratory required.

191. Spanish for Medical Personnel II.
Prerequisite: 190 or equivalent.
Intensive review of the basic skills. Study of medical terminology. One additional hour weekly in the language laboratory required.

250. Composition and Conversation.
Prerequisite: 104 or equivalent.
A course designed to develop greater fluency in speech and writing. Intensive engagement in oral and written expression based on various readings. Conducted entirely in Spanish.

251. Composition and Conversation II.
Prerequisite: 104 or equivalent.
Continuation of 250.

252. Composition and Conversation: Native Speakers.
Prerequisite: fluency in Spanish.
A course designed for Spanish-speaking students. Intensive study of grammar and composition.

253. Advanced Composition and Conversation: Native Speakers.
Prerequisite: 252 or equivalent.
Continuation of 252.

270. Main Currents of Spanish Literature I.
Prerequisite: 104 or equivalent.
Representative works and literary movements from the origins through the seventeenth century. Conducted entirely in Spanish.

271. Main Currents of Spanish Literature II.
Prerequisite: 104 or equivalent.
Representative works and literary movements from the eighteenth century through the twentieth century.

300. Tutorial for Credit.
Prerequisite: chairpersonís permission.
Eligible students majoring in Spanish may elect tutorial for credit. Topic chosen in consultation with faculty member

302. Business Spanish.
Prerequisite: 251, or chairís permission.
Introduction to the fundamentals of Hispanic culture as it relates to business practices. Study of the language of commerce.

305. Advanced Spanish Grammar.
Prerequisite: 251 and chairís permission.
Intensive study of Spanish grammar and stylistics through novels and current periodical publications. Discussion and composition.

308. Literary Criticism. (FREN 308) (GERM 308) (ITAL 308)
Prerequisite: chairís permission.
Introduction to various theories and methods of literary criticism with special attention to historical, theoretical, and structural approaches. Conducted in English.

311. Generation of 1898.
Prerequisite: chairís permission.
Intensive study of the generation of 1898 through selected readings of its outstanding authors. Discussion of the historical, literary, and sociological aspects of this movement.

319. Romanticism.
Prerequisite: chairís permission.
Readings in the major Spanish romantic authors. Analysis of the term; discussion of the principles; foreign influences; tracing of the movementís historical development.

326. Theater of the Golden Age.
Prerequisite: chairís permission.
Selected readings in the field of Spanish Golden Age drama, with emphasis on Lope de Vegaís creation of the Comedia Nueva and its continuance in the works of Tirso de Molina and Calderon de la Barca.

331. Twentieth Century Poetry.
Prerequisite: chairís permission.
Study of the development of modern poetry from post-modernism to the present with a special emphasis on Spanish and Latin American poets of the avant garde.

339. Nineteenth Century Poetry.
Prerequisite: chairís permission.
Study of the genesis and evolution of romanticism and modernism in selected poets from Spain and Latin America.

340. Survey of Spanish ProseóFictional and Nonfictional.
Prerequisite: chairís permission.
Study of the development of Spanish prose. Representative selections from the short story, the short novel, the novel, and the essay.

341. Twentieth Century Spanish Literature.
Prerequisite: chairís permission.
A cross-genre course in which selected plays, essays, poems, novels, and short stories of twentieth-century Spanish literature are studied in their cultural, historical, and aesthetic contexts.

346. Prose of the Golden Age.
Prerequisite: chairís permission.
Readings in the various types of Golden Age prose (excluding Don Quijote). Representative selections from the pastoral and picaresque novels, the short novel, and didactic works.

347. Cervantesí Don Quijote.
Prerequisite: chairís permission.
An intensive reading of the Spanish text of Cervantesí masterpiece, Don Quijote de la Mancha. Discussion of the evolution of critical analysis of the Quijote.

349. Realism and Naturalism.
Prerequisite: chairís permission.
Study of Spanish realism and naturalism through the analytic reading of selected novels of the nineteenth century.

352. Masterpieces of Latin American Literature. (LASP 372)
Prerequisite: chairís permission.
Multi-genre study of the masterworks of Latin American literature from the colonial period to the present.

369. Introduction to Spanish Reading Knowledge.
An introduction to Spanish with emphasis on reading expository prose and with the attention to grammar and vocabulary necessary to facilitate reading. Offered for graduate students preparing to satisfy foreign language reading requirements.

370. Latin American Poetry.
(LASP 370) Prerequisite: chairís permission.
Study of the development of Spanish-American poetry with special emphasis on Modernismo and the movements following this period.

380. Latin American Prose Fiction. (LASP 380)
Prerequisite: chairís permission.
Study of the development of Latin American prose fiction from its beginnings to the present with particular emphasis on outstanding twentieth-century Latin American novels and short stories.

381. Contemporary Latin American Novel. (LASP381, INTS 383)
Prerequisite: chairís permission.
Representative works from the second half of the twentieth century, including authors of the boom and post boom periods.

385. Caribbean Literature. (LASP 385)
Prerequisite: chairís permission.
A survey course studying the cultural and literary history of the Spanish Antilles: Cuba, the Dominican Republic and Puerto Rico.

389. Latin American Short Story. (LASP 389)
Prerequisite: chairís permission.
Study of the development of the short story in Latin America. Representative works from major authors.

390. Culture and Civilization. (INTS 397) (LASP 390)
Prerequisite: 251 and chairís permission.
Multidisciplinary, multigenre course examining the principal components of either Latin American or Spanish culture.

395. Internship.
Prerequisite: 251 or 252 or fluency in target language and chairís permission.
Supervised field experience and opportunity to apply skills and analysis. Students are required: 1) to spend a minimum of 15 hours per week working in a selected educational institution, community organization, social agency, or business marketing research firm; 2) to meet regularly with an assigned faculty member; and 3) to write reports/papers on their field experience as instructed by faculty member. Placements have included work with the elderly, neighborhood organizations, educational institutions, legal agencies, and business firms.

397. Topics in Hispanic Literature. (LASP 397)
Prerequisite: chairís permission.
Designed to integrate the studentís understanding of Hispanic literature. An underlying theme is explored as it manifests itself in the development of literary movements.

399H. Honors Tutorial.
Prerequisite: consent of chairperson.
Independent study coordinated with faculty member to integrate directed readings with the studentís special area of interest in major program.

other Language Courses

The following courses, in which full major sequences are not offered, allow students to master the fundamentals of various languages: Arabic, Chinese, Hebrew, Hindi-Urdu, Japanese, Polish, Russian.

Arabic

101. Arabic I.
For students without previous study of the language. Introduction to the basic elements that will enable the student to develop communicative skills and a fundamental knowledge of the Arabic people, language and culture. One additional hour weekly in the language laboratory required.

102. Arabic II.
Prerequisite: 101 with a grade of "C" or better or equivalent, or one year of secondary school training.
Further instruction in basic skills. One additional hour weekly in the language laboratory required.

Chinese

101. Chinese I. (ASIA C01)
For students without previous study of the language. Introduction to the basic elements that will enable the student to develop communicative skills and a fundamental knowledge of the Chinese people, language and culture. One additional hour weekly in the language laboratory required.

102. Chinese II. (ASIA C02)
Prerequisite: CHIN 101 with a grade of "C" or better or equivalent, or one year of secondary school training.
Further instruction in basic skills. One additional hour weekly in the language laboratory required.

103. Chinese III. (ASIA C03)
Prerequisite CHIN 102 or equivalent, or two years of secondary school training.
Intensive review of basic skills to develop audio-lingual facility in communication. One additional hour weekly in the language laboratory required.

104. Chinese IV. (ASIA C04)
Prerequisite: CHIN 103 or equivalent, or three years of secondary school training.
Reading, conversation and composition based on varied selection from literary and cultural sources. One additional hour weekly in the language laboratory required.

Hebrew

101. Modern Hebrew I.
For students without previous study of the language. Introduction to the basic elements that will enable the student to develop communicative skills and a fundamental knowledge of the Israeli people, their language and their culture. One additional hour weekly in the language laboratory required.

102. Modern Hebrew II.
Prerequisite: HEBR 101 with a grade of "C" or better or equivalent, or one year of secondary school training.
Further instruction in basic skills. One additional hour weekly in the language laboratory required.

Hindi-urdu

101. Hindi-Urdu I. (ASIA HU1)
For students without previous study of the language. Introduction to the basic elements that will enable the student to develop communicative skills and a fundamental knowledge of Hindi-Urdu speakers and South Asian culture. One additional hour weekly in the language laboratory required.

102. Hindi-Urdu II. (ASIA HU2)
Prerequisite: HNDI I with a grade of "C" or better or equivalent or one year of secondary school training.
Further instruction in basic skills. One additional hour weekly in the language laboratory required.

103. Hindi-Urdu III. (ASIA HU3)
Prerequisite: HNDI II or equivalent, or two years of secondary school training.
Intensive review of basic skills to develop audio-lingual facility in communication. One additional hour weekly in the language laboratory required.

104. Hindi-Urdu IV. (ASIA HU4)
Prerequisite HNDI III or equivalent, or three years of secondary school training.
Reading, conversation and composition based on varied selections from literary and cultural sources. One additional hour weekly in the language laboratory required.

Japanese

101. Japanese I. (ASIA J01)
For students without previous study of the language. Introduction to the basic elements that will enable the student to develop communicative skills and a fundamental knowledge of the Japanese people, language and culture. One additional hour weekly in the language laboratory required.

102. Japanese II. (ASIA J02)
Prerequisite: JAPN 101 with a grade of "C" or better or equivalent, or one year of secondary school training.
Further instruction in basic skills. One additional hour weekly in the language laboratory required.

103. Japanese III. (ASIA J03)
Prerequisite: JAPN 102 or equivalent, or two years of secondary school training.
Intensive review of the basic skills to develop audio-lingual facility in communication. One additional hour weekly in the language laboratory required.

104. Japanese IV. (ASIA J04)
Prerequisite: JAPN 103 or equivalent, or three years of secondary school training.
Reading, conversation, and composition based on varied selections from literary and cultural sources. One additional hour weekly in the language laboratory required.

Polish

101. Polish I.
For students without previous study of the language. Introduction to the basic elements that will enable the student to develop communicative skill and a fundamental knowledge of the Polish people, language and culture. One additional hour weekly in the language laboratory required.

102. Polish II.
Prerequisite: POLS 101 with a grade of "C" or better or equivalent, or one year of secondary school training.
Further instruction in basic skills. One additional hour weekly in the language laboratory required.

Russian

101. Russian I.
For students without previous study of the language. Introduction to the basic elements that will enable the student to develop communicative skills and a fundamental knowledge of the Russian people, languages and culture. One additional hour weekly in the language laboratory required.

102. Russian II.
Prerequisite: RUSS 101 with a grade of "C" or better or equivalent, or one year of secondary school training.
Further instruction in basic skills. One additional hour weekly in the language laboratory required.

Literature in English Translation (LITR)

The following courses are offered in English translation. With the exception of 391, all of these courses are core courses in literature and may also be taken without prerequisites as electives. They are normally not counted for credit toward majors in French, German, Italian, or Spanish. French, German, Italian, and Spanish 270 and 271 also are core courses in literature.

Asian

287. Asian Literature. (INTS 287)
Representative works of Asian literature are studied in their cultural, historical, and aesthetic contexts. Variable titles.

European

280. European Masterpieces. (INTS 280)
A cross-genre course in which representative works of European literature are studied in their cultural, historical, and aesthetic contexts.

281. European Novel. (INTS 281)
A study of selected European novels. Focus on the literary form within its historical context.

282. European Drama. (INTS 282)
A study of selected European plays. Focus on the literary form within its historical context.

283. European Authors. (INTS 283)
A study of the major achievements of one or more authors to illustrate the individual artistís thematic concerns, literary techniques, style, and historical position. Variable titles.

284. European Film. (INTS 284)
An analytical study of selected European feature films, with emphasis on film as a literary genre.

299. Comparative Literature. (INTS 299)
Literary texts from three different cultures are studied comparatively.

391. Topics in Comparative Literature. (CLST 391) (ENGL 391)
The capstone for the comparative literature minor. A study of the history, problems, and topics of comparative literature study.

French

280. French Masterpieces.
A cross-genre course in which representative works of French literature are studied in their cultural, historical, and aesthetic contexts.

281. French Novel.
A study of selected French novels. Focus on the literary form within its historical context.

282. French Drama.
A study of selected French plays. Focus on the literary form within its historical context.

283. French Authors.
A study of the major achievements of one or more authors to illustrate the individual artistís thematic concerns, literary techniques, style, and historical position. Variable titles.

German

280. German Masterpieces.
A cross-genre course in which representative works of German literature are studied in their cultural, historical, and aesthetic contexts.

281. German Novel.
A study of selected German novels. Focus on the literary form within its historical context.

282. German Drama.
A study of selected German plays. Focus on the literary form within its historical context.

283. German Authors.
A study of the major achievements of one or more authors to illustrate the individual artistís thematic concerns, literary techniques, style, and historical position. Variable titles.

Italian

280. Italian Masterpieces. (ROST 280)
A cross-genre course in which representative works of Italian literature are studied in their cultural, historical, and aesthetic contexts.

281. Italian Novel. (ROST 281)
A study of selected Italian novels. Focus on the literary form within its historical context.

282. Italian Drama. (ROST 282)
A study of selected Italian plays. Focus on the literary form within its historical context.

283. Italian Authors. (ROST 283)
A study of the major achievements of one or more authors to illustrate the individual artistís thematic concerns, literary techniques, style, and historical position. Variable titles.

Russian

280. Russian Masterpieces.
A cross-genre course in which representative works of Russian literature are studied in their cultural, historical, and aesthetic contexts.

281. Russian Novel.
A study of selected Russian novels. Focus on the literary form within its historical context.

Spanish

280. Spanish Masterpieces.
A cross-genre course in which representative works of Spanish literature are studied in their cultural, historical, and aesthetic contexts.

281. Spanish Novel.
A study of selected Spanish novels. Focus on the literary form within its historical context.

282. Spanish Drama.
A study of selected Spanish plays. Focus on the literary form within its historical context.

283. Spanish Authors.
A study of the major achievements of one or more authors to illustrate the individual artistís thematic concerns, literary techniques, style, and historical position. Variable titles.

286. Latin American Literature. (INTS 286) (LASP 286)
Representative works of Latin American literature are studied in their cultural, historical, and aesthetic contexts. Variable titles.

Linguistics (LING)

Linguistics is the study of a human language. Courses in linguistics focus on those inquiries into language behavior that can lead to a better understanding of the human condition: child language acquisition and development from a psycholinguistic perspective; speech as related to age, sex, education, ethnicity, culture, and socioeconomic status from a sociolinguistic perspective; the bilingual and bicultural person in an urban environment; and the linguistic and cultural differences between English and French, German, Italian, and Spanish. LING 110, 115, 120 and 125 fulfill the core requirement in social science.

110. Nature of Language.
An introductory course in the social phenomena of language use: how and why do we say what we say and to whom? Provides a sociolinguistic methodology for the study of language components and variations. Analysis of language games and strategies.

115. Language and Culture.
Examines linguistic behavior in relation to various subcultures. Studies how man becomes dependent on the components of the speech setting and multiple cultural factors affecting speech performance.

120. Language, Ethnicity, and Society. (INTS 120)
Studies past and present ethnic immigrant groups to the United States and how immigrants become acculturated and assimilated to Americana according to certain values and beliefs determined by the established social classes of Americans.

302. Methods of Teaching Foreign Language. (CIEP M63)
Prerequisite: permission.
Techniques and materials for teaching the target language to English-speaking students.

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