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Undergraduate Studies Catalog

DEPARTMENT OF CHEMISTRY (CHEM)

Lake Shore Campus:

Flanner Hall 125
Phone: 773-508-3100
FAX: 773-508-3086
www.luc.edu/depts/chem

Professors Emeriti: E. Burrell, A.K. Jameson, B. Jaselskis, C. Moore

Professors: J. Babler, D. Crumrine, A. Fitch, L. Fung, P. Henry, A. Herlinger, D. Mota de Freitas, K. Olsen (chairperson), S. Pavkovic

Associate Professors: M. Boyd, M.P. Chiarelli, D. Graham

Assistant Professors: D. Celander, D. Nelson, M. Schmeling

Laboratory Instructors: A. Boerger, F. Dias, T. Thomas

The chemistry major programs and all chemistry courses are offered only at Lake Shore Campus. The B.S. degrees meet the criteria set by the American Chemical Society for professional training in chemistry; students following this program may be certified to the ACS as eligible for membership.

OBJECTIVES

The programs in chemistry lay a firm foundation for chemistry majors and give other students a cultural background in chemistry. The upper division courses are designed to educate the chemistry major for graduate studies or industrial work. Three tracks for the chemistry major are available: the B.S. in Chemistry, the B.S. in Chemistry with emphasis in Biochemistry and the B.A. in Chemistry programs. The B.S. programs are intended explicitly for those undergraduates who have career goals in chemistry (i.e., an industrial or academic chemistry career most probably following graduate training for the M.S. and/or Ph.D. degrees) but are also good preparation for careers in medicine, law, pharmacy and other professions. The B.A. program is intended for those undergraduates who have career goals in fields other than chemistry, but for which a strong chemistry background is desirable (e.g., medicine, dentistry, technical sales, patent law).

MATHEMATICS PREPAREDNESS FOR CHEMISTRY

Students intending to register for a chemistry course will need a background in mathematics that is commensurate with the computational requirements of the chemistry course. Evidence of math preparedness is obtained from results of a Math Placement Test (MPT) administered by the College in conjunction with the Department of Mathematical and Computer Sciences. Students who are found to be mathematically underprepared are required to pass the appropriate course or sequence of courses n mathematics with a grade of "C" or better before they register for a chemistry course.

Degree Requirements For Major In Chemistry (B.S.)
 
 
Courses
Credit Hrs.
Chemistry 105, 106, 215, 221, 222, 301, 302, 303, 310, 311, 340, 341, and a minimum of two electives
14
42
Mathematics 161, 162, 263, 264
4
16
Physics 113, 114, 133, 134
4
10
Foreign language
2
6
English 105 and 106
2
6
History core
2
6
Literature core
3
9
Philosophy core
3
9
Theology core
3
9
Social science core
2
6
Communicative/expressive arts core
1
3
Electives to complete minimum total of 128 credit hours
variable
6
TOTAL
128
 

DEPARTMENTAL REQUIREMENTS FOR THE B.S. DEGREE IN CHEMISTRY

Fourteen courses totaling 42 credit hours as follows: Chemical Principles (105), Basic Inorganic Chemistry (106), Organic Chemistry I and II (221, 222), Elementary Quantitative Analysis (215), Physical Chemistry I and II (301, 302), Physical Chemistry Laboratory (303), Instrumental Analysis (310), Instrumental Analysis Laboratory (311), Advanced Inorganic Chemistry (340), Advanced Inorganic Chemistry Laboratory (341), and a minimum of two elective courses in chemistry totaling 6 credit hours. Credit hours earned in CHEM 300, Undergraduate Research, do not count as elective hours satisfying the B.S. degree requirement.

B.S. majors in chemistry must also take the following related courses: PHYS 113, 114, 133 & 134; MATH 161, 162, 263 & 264; and two courses for a minimum of six credit hours, or two years of high school courses or the equivalent, in a foreign language. The department recommends German, French, Russian or Japanese.

DEPARTMENTAL REQUIREMENTS FOR THE B.S. DEGREE IN CHEMISTRY WITH EMPHASIS ON BIOCHEMISTRY

Twelve (or more) specified courses in chemistry totaling 38 hours as follows: Chemical Principles (105) or 101 and 111; Basic Inorganic Chemistry (106) or 102 and 112; Organic Chemistry I (221) or 223 and 225; Organic Chemistry II (222) or 224 and 226; Elementary Quantitative Analysis (215); Physical Chemistry I and II (301 and 302); Physical Chemistry Laboratory (303); Advanced Inorganic Chemistry (340); Survey in Biochemistry (361); Current Concepts in Biochemistry (362); and Biochemistry Laboratory (363). B.S. majors with emphasis in biochemistry must also take the following related courses: BIOL 101, 102, 111, 112 and 251, 252 or 282, 283; PHYS 111, 112, 131 and 132 or 113, 114 and 133, 134 or 125, 126, and 135, 136; MATH 131, 132 or 161, 162. The department strongly recommends Undergraduate Research (CHEM 300) and the study of one of the following languages: German, French, Russian or Japanese.

Degree Requirements For Major In Chemistry With Biochemistry Emphasis (B.S.)
 
 
Courses
Credit Hrs.
Chemistry 105 (or 101 and 111), 106 (or 102 and 112), 215, 221 (or 223 and 225), 222 (or 224 and 226), 301, 302, 303, 340, 361, 362, and 363
12
38
Biology 101, 102, 111, 112, AND 251, 252 OR 282, 283
4
13
Physics 111, 112, 131, 132 **(or 113, 114, 133, 134 or 125, 126, 135, 136)
4
8
Mathematics 161, 162 **(or 131, 132)
2
8
History core
2
6
English 105 and 106
2
6
Literature core
3
9
Philosophy core
3
9
Theology core
3
9
Social science core
2
6
Communicative/expressive arts core
1
3
Foreign language
2
6
Electives to complete minimum total of 128 credit hours
variable
7 *
TOTAL
128
 

*Chemistry 300 is strongly recommended. **Preferable.

DEPARTMENTAL REQUIREMENTS FOR THE B.A. DEGREE IN CHEMISTRY

Eleven (or more) specified courses in chemistry totaling 35 hours as follows: Chemical Principles (105) or 101 and 111; Basic Inorganic Chemistry (106) or 102 and 112; Organic Chemistry I (221) or 223 and 226; Organic Chemistry II (222) or 224 and 226; Elementary Quantitative Analysis (215); Physical Chemistry I and II (301 and 302); Physical Chemistry Laboratory (303); Instrumental Analysis (310); Instrumental Analysis Laboratory (311); and Advanced Inorganic Chemistry (340).

B.A. majors must also take the following related courses: PHYS 111, 112, 131 and 132; MATH 161 and 162. The department also recommends the study of one of the following languages: German, French, Russian or Japanese.

DEGREE REQUIREMENTS FOR MAJOR IN CHEMISTRY (B.A.)
 
 
Courses
Credit Hrs.
Chemistry 105 (or 101 and 111), 106 (or 102 and 112), 215, 221 (or 223 and 225), 222 (or 224 and 226), 301, 302, 303, 310, 311, 340
11
35
Physics 111, 112, 131, 132 (or 113, 114, 133, 134)
4
8
Mathematics 161, 162
2
8
History core
2
6
English 105 and 106
2
6
Literature core
3
9
Philosophy core
3
9
Theology core
3
9
Social science core
2
6
Communicative/expressive arts core
1
3
Foreign language
2
6
Electives to complete minimum total of 128 credit hours
variable
23
TOTAL
128
 

NOTES ON THE CURRICULA AND OTHER DEPARTMENTAL REGULATIONS

Requirements for Continuation in Chemistry Degree Programs: Students will be retained automatically in the B.A. or B.S. degree programs if they earn grades of "C" or better in the required chemistry courses. A chemistry course for which a grade below "C" is earned will not count toward satisfying degree requirements and must be repeated. If a student receives two grades lower than "C" in chemistry courses, the student may be withdrawn from the program. Students should consult the dean before repeating a course in their major field of study (see "Major Field of Study," page 25).

Requirement for a "C" in Prerequisite Chemistry Courses: Students must have a "C" or better in any prerequisite chemistry course before they will be allowed to take their next chemistry course.

Advanced Placement: College credit and advanced placement may be granted to entering freshmen who have qualified themselves in the judgment of the department in the chemistry examination of the advanced placement program administered by the College Entrance Examination Board.

Transfer Students: Chemistry courses which have been taken at other institutions, accepted for transfer credit at Loyola, and required by the Loyola chemistry degree program, will be recommended for satisfying degree requirements only after evaluation by the department. Please contact the department for further information.

Graduate Courses: Seniors who have earned a 3.0 GPA and who are judged capable of pursuing graduate studies may be admitted to graduate courses. Prior to registration the student must obtain a permission form from The Graduate School office and have the completed form signed by the course instructor, chairperson, and dean of The Graduate School. The form must be deposited in the Chemistry Department office before the student registers.

Requirements for a Minor in Chemistry: Students majoring in areas other than chemistry may satisfy requirements for a MINOR concentration in chemistry by completing 20 credit hours of chemistry with grades of "C" or better; only 1 credit hour of CHEM 300 (Undergraduate Research) may be included in these 20 hours.

Certification Requirements for Teaching Chemistry in High Schools: For information on teacher certification requirements, consult page 197.

Requirements for Departmental Honors in Chemistry: In order to receive chemistry departmental honors at the honors convocation, students must have a Loyola GPA in chemistry major courses of 3.5 or higher exclusive of CHEM 300 and have completed at least one semester of CHEM 300.

COURSES OF INSTRUCTION

(Note: course credit hours are indicated in parentheses following the course title.)

101. General Chemistry A. (3)
Prerequisite: A satisfactory performance on the Loyola math proficiency test; a year of high school chemistry is recommended. Corequisite: 111. Lecture and discussion.
The course deals with the development of basic chemical principles. Topics include atomic and molecular structures, states of matter, energetics and stoichiometry of reactions. (For non-chemistry majors and B.A. majors.)

102. General Chemistry B. (3)
Prerequisites: 101 and 111, or 105. Corequisite: 112. Lecture and discussion.
A continuation of 101. Topics include equilibrium systems, periodic properties, descriptive chemistry.

105. Chemical Principles. (4)
Prerequisites: A satisfactory performance on the Loyola math proficiency test; successful completion of a year of high school chemistry or the equivalent.
A lecture, discussion and laboratory course for majors. Topics consist of stoichiometry, states of matter, chemical equilibrium, acid/base chemistry and kinetics. The laboratory illustrates experimentally the topics covered.

106. Basic Inorganic Chemistry. (4)
Prerequisite: 105.
A lecture, discussion and laboratory course that is a continuation of 105 for majors. Topics include atomic and molecular structure, periodic properties, and the chemistry of the transition elements. Laboratory involves the techniques and procedures of inorganic synthesis and analysis.

111. General Chemistry Laboratory A. (1)
Corequisite: 101.
This laboratory course illustrates experimentally the topics covered in the lecture (101).

112. General Chemistry Laboratory B. (1)
Prerequisites: 101 and 111; or 105. Corequisite: 102.
This laboratory course illustrates experimentally the topics covered in the lecture (102).

151. Elementary Physiological Chemistry A. (4)
Prerequisite: high school chemistry or permission of chairperson.
Lecture, quiz, and laboratory. The emphasis will be on the development of basic chemical properties and electron configuration, states of matter, gas laws, stoichiometry and energetics of reactions, aqueous equilibria, the use of radioisotopes in medicine, environmental considerations, and an introduction to structure and nomenclature in organic chemistry. (Primarily for nursing students.)

152. Elementary Physiological Chemistry B. (4)
Prerequisite: 151.
Lecture, quiz and laboratory. Survey of organic chemistry including nomenclature and reactions of functional groups followed by a survey of biochemical topics including stereochemistry, carbohydrates, lipids, proteins, nucleic acids, digestion, metabolism, vitamins, hormones, and blood. (Primarily for nursing students.)

213. Quantitative Analysis. (4)
Prerequisites: CHEM 102 and 112, or 106; college algebra.
Lecture, quiz, and laboratory. Selected topics in quantitative analysis. (For non-chemistry majors.)

215. Elementary Quantitative Analysis. (4)
Prerequisites: college algebra; CHEM 102 and 112, or 106.
Lecture, discussion and laboratory. Selected topics in quantitative analysis. (For chemistry majors.)

221. Organic Chemistry I. (4)
Prerequisite: 106 (preferred), or 102 and 112.
Lecture, discussion and laboratory. An intensive course for chemistry majors using a mechanistic approach. Topics include organic nomenclature, chemical and physical properties and reactions of several classes of aliphatic compounds, stereochemistry.

222. Organic Chemistry II. (4)
Prerequisite: 221.
Lecture, discussion and laboratory. Continuation of 221. Further classes of aliphatic and aromatic compounds, carbohydrates and other polyfunctional substances; spectroscopy.

223. Organic Chemistry A. (3)
Prerequisites: 102 and 112, or 106.
Lecture and discussion. First semester of a two semester sequence for non-chemistry majors. A survey of topics including stereochemistry; spectroscopy; and fundamental concepts of organic chemistry involving aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons, alkyl halides, alcohols and ethers.

224. Organic Chemistry B. (3)
Prerequisite: 223 or equivalent.
Lecture. Second semester for non-chemistry majors. Organic chemistry of carbonyl compounds, amines, carboxylic acids and their derivatives, carbohydrates, lipids and proteins.

225. Organic Chemistry Laboratory A. (1)
Co- or prerequisite: 223.
A laboratory course designed to illustrate experimentally the topics correspondingly covered in 223. The experiments will acquaint students with the laboratory practices and techniques of organic chemistry and several involve preparation of known organic compounds. (For non-chemistry majors.)

226. Organic Chemistry Laboratory B. (1)
Co- or prerequisite: 224. Prerequisite: 225.
A laboratory course to illustrate experimentally certain topics covered in 224. The major portion of the laboratory work involves the identification of several relatively simple organic compounds. (For non-chemistry majors.)

300. Undergraduate Research. (1, 2, or 3)
Prerequisites: prior consultation with the instructor and a completed agreement form.
Directed study involving a contractual arrangement between student and instructor for accomplishing a defined research task. Agreement forms may be obtained from the department office, and the completed form (signed by the student, instructor, and chairperson) must be deposited in the chemistry department office before the student can register for this course.

301. Physical Chemistry I. (4)
Prerequisites: PHYS 112 or 114; MATH 162 or 264 or the equivalent.
Lecture and discussion. Mathematical and physical aspects of the behavior of chemical systems, classical and statistical thermodynamics, chemical kinetics, and the properties of matter.

302. Physical Chemistry II. (3)
Prerequisite: 301. Corequisite: 303.
Lecture. A continuation of 301, including quantum mechanics, molecular structure, spectra, and group theory.

303. Physical Chemistry Laboratory. (1)
Corequisite: 302.
Laboratory course to illustrate experimentally the principles of physical chemistry and to acquaint the student with laboratory methods.

310. Instrumental Analysis. (ESP 310) (2)
Prerequisites: 215, 302. Corequisite: 311.
Lecture. Qualitative and quantitative instrumental analysis. Operational theory of instruments, atomic and molecular absorption and emission spectroscopy, electroanalysis, liquid and gas chromatography. This is a writing intensive course.

311. Instrumental Analysis Laboratory. (ESP 311) (2)
Corequisite: 310.
A laboratory course using selected experiments to illustrate the application of instrumental techniques to the solution of chemical problems. This is a writing-intensive course.

312. Environmental Chemistry. (ESP 312)
Prerequisites: CHEM 222 or 224 & 226.
This course is designed to acquaint students with the sources, reactions, transport, effects, and fates of chemical species in the environment-especially those that are considered to be pollutants. Students will be made aware of state-of-the art analytical techniques used for determinations of EPA listed priority pollutants. Specific issues include the mechanisms associated with the greenhouse effect, ozone depletion, smog formation, acid rain phenomena, and analysis and disposal of hazardous waste.

340. Advanced Inorganic Chemistry. (3)
Prerequisite: 302.
Lecture only. Modern theories of atomic and molecular structure as applied to inorganic chemistry.

341. Advanced Inorganic Laboratory. (1)
Corequisite: 340.
A laboratory course designed to illustrate experimentally the topics and techniques met in modern inorganic chemistry.

361. Survey in Biochemistry. (3)
Prerequisite: 222 or 224 and 226.
Lecture. Structural-functional relationships of proteins, nucleic acids and cell membranes; and metabolic pathways.

362. Current Concepts in Bio-chemistry. (3)
Prerequisite: 361. Lecture.
Current concepts in biochemistry will be explained at a molecular level. For each topic covered in the course, an introductory lecture on basic information will be given first. About six to ten selected topics will be covered.

363. Biochemistry Laboratory. (1)
Prerequisite 361.
A laboratory course designed to illustrate experimentally the principles of biochemistry. This course is for majors only.

395. Special Topics in Chemistry. (1-3)
Prerequisites: Satisfactory progress toward completion of the core of chemistry courses, and junior or senior status.
Specific titles and contents vary from semester to semester.

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