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Undergraduate Studies Catalog

CURRICULUM

The curriculum for the Teachers for the 21st Century is an organized and integrated program of courses. In the following pages, the approved curricula leading to the bachelor’s degree in education are outlined as an aid in planning one’s college courses and in registration for courses. Notations appended to each curriculum outline should be checked carefully before the student registers for courses in each semester. It should also be noted that students must complete two writing-intensive courses. This requirement is described under "Writing Across the Curriculum" in the College of Arts and Sciences section of this catalog.
 
Liberal Arts Core:
Sem. Hrs.
English Composition (ENGL 105, 106)
6
Communication (CMUN 101 or 125)
3
Literature (including ENGL/CIEP 206 Children’s’ Literature)
6
American history
3
Social science courses
6
American government (PLSC 101)
3
Mathematics, MATH 147 and MATH 148
6
Science, including one laboratory
12
Philosophy and Theology including ELPS 302
15
Health and physical development
2
Western civilization, art, history, or literature
3
Approved area of concentration (single discipline)*
18
Electives
3
TOTAL
86

*Approved areas of concentration are: American government, anthropology, art, biology, economics, English, foreign language, history, linguistics, mathematics, music, philosophy, physical science, political science, psychology, sociology, theatre
 
Education Core:
Sem. Hrs.
Seminar in Teaching I-VIII,  
(CIEP 201,202, 203, 204, 311,312,313,314)
8
Educational Psychology (CIEP 229)
3
Introduction to Teaching and Methods (CIEP M23)
3
Practice in Instruction (CIEP M24 taken with CIEP M23)
1
Advanced Instruction (CIEP M83)
4
History of American Education (ELPS 219)
3
Teaching Reading Elementary (CIEP 359)
3
Reading and Writing in the Content Areas (CIEP 362)
3
Exceptional Child (CIEP 339)
3
Computer Applications in Education I (CIEP 261)
1
Computer Applications in Education II (CIEP 361)
2
Student teaching
8
TOTAL
42

CLINICAL EXPERIENCE

Prior to student teaching each teacher education candidate completes a minimum of 100 pre-student teaching clinical hours as described in the program handbook. Student teaching, or practicum, gives the prospective teacher the opportunity to bridge the worlds of theory and practice and to begin the process of developing an individual teaching style. Those engaged in student teaching are closely monitored both by a cooperating teacher in the school and by university faculty.

The School of Education is responsible for maintaining the professional competence of students. If the teacher candidate is judged to be unable to discharge the responsibilities entailed in a clinical experience laboratory, the candidate may be dropped from the course or program. Non-attendance at the clinical site may also result in removal from the clinical experience.

MIDDLE GRADE ENDORSEMENTS

Students preparing to teach in grades 5-8, where fifty percent or more of the teaching assignment is to a position comprised of a single subject of instruction, shall be required to have earned a Middle Grade Teacher Endorsement. Such endorsement can be attached to either the Standard Elementary Certificate or the Standard High School Certificate.

All courses for the middle school endorsement are integrated into the existing elementary/secondary curriculum. For those students interested in teaching middle school mathematics, an additional course CIEP M80, Materials and Methods for Middle School Instruction Mathematics is required.

SECONDARY EDUCATION

Minor in Professional Education Studies with Eligibility for Certification
Students interested in teaching in grades 6-12 matriculate in the College of Arts and Sciences. They must complete the College of Arts and Sciences core requirements and a major in an approved teaching field. A sequence of six professional education courses plus student teaching is completed in the School of Education. Early advisement is crucial to an efficient program. Students should contact the Office of Student Academic Services if considering a teaching career.

SUBJECT AREAS

The following are areas for which certification may be sought at Loyola University: biology, chemistry, communication/speech*, English, history, Latin, mathematics, Spanish, French, German, Italian, physics*, political science*, psychology*, sociology*, theatre*. Students should check with the Office of Student Academic Services for specific subject area requirements for certification.

*These subjects require preparation in a second teaching field.

ADMISSION TO TEACHER EDUCATION

Admission to professional teacher education will be considered after the successful completion of two education courses specified in the secondary education program with a minimum GPA of 2.8, completion of English 105 and 106, and a course in speech communication with grades of "C" or better. Students must have completed a minimum of eight hours in their major with a GPA of 2.8 and an overall GPA 2.5. Additionally, students must pass the Illinois Test of Basic Skills.

ADMISSION TO STUDENT TEACHING

Admission to student teaching requires completion of all hours in the subject area and professional education prior to student teaching, a successful interview, a 2.8 GPA in both the subject to be taught and education classes, a 2.5 overall GPA, and evidence of 100 hours of clinical field experience. Students are also expected to pass the required Illinois subject matter tests.

PROGRAM GOALS

Program goals for Secondary Education candidates are derived from content-based standards of the Illinois State Board of Education and the applicable learned societies.

GENERAL EDUCATION

Graduates of Loyola University of Chicago meet most of the general education requirements for certification as a secondary school teacher through completion of the liberal arts core curriculum in the college of Arts and Sciences. Courses must include three hours of oral communication, six hours of written communication, one course in American Studies in the humanities or social sciences, one course in non-Western or Third World culture in the humanities or social sciences, two hours of health and physical development, and at least thirty-two hours of specialization (possibly including some of the above courses) in a major field approved by the State of Illinois.

PROFESSIONAL EDUCATION

Professional Education
Loyola’s professional education sequence includes 30 hours of professional education courses:

American Education (ELPS 219) or Philosophy of Education (ELPS 302)

Introduction to Educational Psychology (CIEP 229)

Techniques of Teaching in Secondary Schools (CIEP M13)

Principles of Instruction- Secondary (CIEP M14)

The Exceptional Child (CIEP 339)

Reading and Writing in the Content Areas (CIEP 362 and CIEP L362 Lab)

Choose one of the following and coregister with corresponding lab class for one hour of credit, depending on subject to be taught:

Secondary Methods: Social Studies (CIEP M60 & CIEP LM60)

Secondary Methods: English (CIEP M61& LM61)

Secondary Methods: Mathematics (CIEP M62 & CIEP LM62)

Secondary Methods: Modern Languages (CIEP M63 & CIEP LM63)

Secondary Methods: Science (CIEP M64 & CIEP LM64)

Student Teaching- Secondary School (CIEP MU6) (Student teaching is a full-semester, full-day experience. Students are required to attend a student teaching seminar each week).

CLINICAL EXPERIENCE

Prior to student teaching each teacher education candidate completes a minimum of 100 pre-student teaching clinical hours as described in the program handbook. Student teaching, or practicum, gives the prospective teacher the opportunity to bridge the worlds of theory and practice and to begin the process of developing an individual teaching style. Those engaged in student teaching are closely monitored both by a cooperating teacher in the school and by university faculty.

The School of Education is responsible for maintaining the professional competence of students. If the teacher candidate is judged to be unable to discharge the responsibilities entailed in a clinical experience laboratory, the candidate may be dropped from the course or program. Nonattendance at the clinical site may also result in removal from the clinical experience.

MIDDLE GRADE ENDORSEMENTS

Students preparing to teach in grades 6-8, where fifty percent or more of the teaching assignment is to a position comprised of a single subject of instruction, shall be required to have earned a Middle Grade Teacher Endorsement. Such endorsement can be attached to either the Standard Elementary Certificate or the Standard High School Certificate.

All courses for the middle school endorsement are integrated into the existing elementary/secondary curriculum. For those students interested in teaching middle school mathematics, an additional course CIEP M80, Materials and Methods for Middle School Instruction Mathematics is required.

COURSE OFFERINGS:

Curriculum, Instruction and Educational Psychology (CIEP)

104. Mathematics for Teachers I. (MATH 147)
Review of the fundamentals of mathematics, emphasizing problem-solving, number relationships, applications, graphic representations, and investigation of the number systems.

105. Mathematics for Teachers II. (Math 148)
This course develops essential understanding of statistics, probability, logic, algebra and geometry. May be computer-based.

111. LEAP Workshop.
An opportunity for the student, through reading and discussion, to examine the rationale for college and to understand the operations of the system.

112. Strategies for Learning.
A continuation of 111.

160. Consumer Health & Survival. (CMAN 160)

201-204 & 301-304. Seminar in Teaching I, II, III and IV.
The seminar prepares future teachers by offering a monitoring process that connects teacher candidates with each other and with university faculty and professional teacher practitioners through shared learning experience.

206 Children’s Literature. (ENGL 206)
The course explores the history of children’s literature and provides criteria for evaluation of contemporary children’s reading. Designed for students, teachers and parents interested in better guidance of children’s reading.

229. Introduction to Educational Psychology.
Students learn to apply psychological principals in varied instructional settings. Includes an overview of theories of learning and development. Five hours of pre-student teaching clinical hours, including guided observations are required.

261. Computer Applications in Education I.
Use of the computer as a tool in education- Part I.

302. Teaching English as a Second Language.

305. Practicum in Reading Disabilities.

The student is responsible for the diagnosing of reading difficulties through testing and through client and parent interviews; the student develops reading techniques for remediation of difficulties.

333. Education of the Urban Child. (BWS 333)
A discussion of the sociological, psychological and educational problems of urban schools. Problems of teaching and the role of the teacher are examined in this context.

335. AIDS: Interdisciplinary Studies. (GNUR 338)

336. Child Development and Implications for Education.
Survey of theory and research relevant to the cognitive, emotional and social development of children.

339. The Exceptional Child.
An introduction to the concept of exceptionality dealing with the educational implications of atypical child growth and development. Focus is given to the psychology and teaching of culturally diverse and atypical children including those with learning disorders. Ten hours of pre-student teaching clinical hours, included guided observations are required.

350. Adolescent Literature.

359. Teaching Reading – Elementary.
This course introduces the education student to the teaching and learning process associated with balanced literacy instruction in the elementary school. Developmental stages of learning to read and write, interactive teaching methods and materials are the focus of this course.

L359. Teaching Reading – Elementary Lab.
Directed classroom experiences that consist of a minimum of 20 clinical hours that include lesson planning and teaching related to the course content.

360. Interdisciplinary Workshop.

361. Computer Applications in Education II.
Use of the computer as a tool in classroom instruction- Part II.

362. Reading and Writing in the Content Areas.
Emphasis on reading and writing instruction as it applies to the subject areas taught in most elementary and secondary schools. Specific sections for elementary and secondary education are designated.

L362. Reading and Writing in the Content Areas Lab.
Directed classroom experiences that consists of a minimum of 20 clinical hours that include lesson planning and teaching related to the course content.

363. Workshop in the Individualization of Instruction.
A workshop designed to assist elementary and secondary teachers, supervisors and administrators to implement instruction based on individual differences in learning styles and abilities.

373. Workshop in Secondary School Latin. (LATN 373)

381. Educational and Psychological Measurement.
An introduction to the theory and practice of educational and psychological measurement.

390. Field Study in Education.
Practical experience in the classroom prior to student teaching designed to acquaint the student with classroom problems and practices.

MU5. Student Teaching – Elementary School.
Students planning to teach in the elementary schools must have completed all professional education courses with a grade point average of 2.80 or higher. (A full time, full semester experience).

MU6. Student Teaching – Secondary School.
Students planning to teach at the secondary level must have completed all hours in their major with a grade point average of 2.80 or higher and all professional education courses (A full-time, full semester experience).

M13. Techniques of Teaching in Secondary Schools.
A study of teaching procedures and learning activities in the secondary school; a critical examination of lesson plans, assignments, projects, problems, units, testing, diagnostic and remedial work; also methods of teaching learning disabled and other exceptional students at the secondary level.

M14. Principles of Instruction – Secondary.
Coregister with M13
Directed classroom experiences that consist of a minimum of 30 clinical hours that include lesson planning and teaching related to the course content.

M22. Problems and Materials in the Teaching of Reading and Language Arts.
Examination of the basic problems and techniques of instruction in reading, language arts, and emergent literacy. Provision is made for the needs of children in a regular classroom, as well as for those in behavior disordered and other exceptional classroom settings.

M23. Introduction to Teaching and General Elementary Methods.
This course is designed to help students examine the complex role of the teacher and to understand principles and methods of curriculum, instruction, and evaluation in the elementary school.

M24. Clinical Experience.
This course consists of a minimum of 20 clinical hours including classroom observation, lesson planning, and teaching. Coregister with M23.

M55. Teaching of Reading in the Secondary School.
The problems of reading at the secondary school level, with emphasis upon methods for helping high school students improve their speed and comprehension of reading.

M60. Secondary Methods: Social Studies.

LM60 Secondary Methods: Social Studies. (Lab)

M61 Secondary Methods: English. (ENGL 396)

LM61 Secondary Methods: English. (ENGL 396) (Lab)

M62 Secondary Methods: Mathematics.

LM62 Secondary Methods: Mathematics. (Lab)

M63 Secondary Methods: Modern Language. (LING 302)

LM63. Secondary Methods: Modern Language. (Lab)

M64. Secondary Methods: Science.

LM64. Secondary Methods: Science. (Lab)

M68. Materials and Techniques for Teaching Religion in the Elementary School.

M69. Materials and Techniques for Teaching Religion in the Secondary School.

M80. Materials and Methods for Middle School Instruction.
This course focuses on instructional activities appropriate to middle school departmentalized school curriculum (Separate section focuses on mathematics in the middle grades).

M83. Advanced Elementary Instruction: Subject Specific.
This course focuses on developing methods of teaching with emphasis on math and science.

LM83. Advanced Elementary Instruction: Subject Specific.
Directed classroom experiences that include a minimum of 20 clinical hours of lesson planning and teaching related to the course content.

Counseling Psychology (CPSY)

CPSY 200.The Psychology of Academic and Personal Effectiveness.
Offered for students wanting to increase potential for succeeding in college, e.g., entering freshmen, adult learners, and those experiencing academic difficulties. Teaches study skills and addresses issues relevant to facilitating students’ academic and personal success at Loyola. Explores both academic and personal adjustments to university life. The format will be a combination of lectures, discussions, and group experiences. Students are asked to learn new skills and to build on skills they already have. Topics include: motivation, goal setting, procrastination, time management, writing papers, note-taking, reading textbooks, test anxiety, test-taking skills, stress management, and critical thinking.

CPSY 224.Career and Life Planning Lab.
Because most students will make several career or job changes during their lives, the purpose of this course is to teach students a decision-making process that can be used when making career-related decisions. Throughout the course, students will apply this decision-making process to a decision they are trying to make (e.g., choosing a major, choosing a career). Topics will include: self-assessment of interests, values, and skills; how to gather educational and occupational information; exploring decision-making strategies; the lifelong nature of career planning; and planning an effective job search campaign. Testing fee: $15.00.

CPSY 273. Developmental Psychology. (PSYC 273)
Prerequisite: PSYC 101.
Survey of theory and research relevant to human growth and development with emphasis on personality, maturation and learning.

CPSY 333. Abnormal Psychology. (PSYC 331)
Prerequisite: PSYC 101.
Nature and causes of maladjustment and mental disorders. History of mental illness, diagnosis, research, and treatment of mental disorders.

CPSY 334. Child, Family andCommunity.
A study of human behavior through the life cycle, with emphasis on the biological, psychological and socio-cultural factors that influence development. Units of analysis are the child, family and community in a pluralistic, multicultural American society. (Ten clinical hours required).

CPSY 335. Attitudes, Values and Sexual Behavior.
This course includes a survey of the various factors, which influence the attitudes and values determining sexual behavior and decision-making in interpersonal relationships.

CPSY 337. Adolescent Development and Implications for Education.
Problems in the growth, learning, intelligence, emotional and personality development of adolescents. Application to educational procedures in the secondary and middle-graded schools.

CPSY 338. Psychology of Personality. (PSYC 338)
Prerequisite: PSYC 101.
Facts and principles of personality study. Nature of personality, its structure, development, expression, and measurement. Exposition and evaluation of personality study methods with critical review of traditional and modern theories of personality.

CPSY 342. Issues in Identity Development and Cultural Pluralism.
A critical examination of theory and research on the role of culture in identity development. Particular emphasis will be given to such concepts as racism, sexism, ethnicity, culture, class prejudice, and ethnocentrism and how these help shape an individual’s identity and society’s conceptualization of culture.

CPSY 380. Statistical Methods. (CIEP 380)
Fundamentals of statistical analysis in psychology and education; organization of data, measures of central tendency and variability; the normal curve; standardized scores; correlation and regression; and hypothesis testing.

Educational Leadership and Policy Studies (ELPS)

ELPS 219. American Education.
An examination of American education with emphasis on the history, aims, organization, and control of public and private schools. Emphasis is placed on the development of American educational ideas and institutions in a multi-cultural society.

ELPS 310. History of Western Education.
A historical analysis of the rise and development of educational movements, trends, institutions, and policies in the multicultural context of American society.

ELPS 302. Philosophy of Education.
Philosophical principles underlying education and their applications.

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