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Undergraduate Studies Catalog

INTERNATIONAL STUDIES PROGRAM (INTS)

Lake Shore Campus:
Damen Hall 105
Phone: 773-508-8999
FAX: 773-508-2940
http://www.luc.edu/depts/internat_st

Director: V. Mahler

OBJECTIVES

The International Studies (INTS) program serves students who wish to achieve a deeper understanding of other nations, cultures and peoples. Students majoring or minoring in international studies will explore general aspects of the international system from the perspectives of the academic departments represented in the program. Students will also examine the history, politics and culture of various geographical regions of the world. To facilitate these studies, International Studies majors and minors will develop a level of proficiency in a modern language beyond the general requirement of the College of Arts and Sciences.

The International Studies major is intended for students who wish to examine international issues from the perspectives of a number of academic disciplines in the humanities and social sciences. The program allows students flexibility in pursuing a general curriculum or emphasizing either cultural and literary perspectives or political, historical, and economic perspectives. In developing their programs, international studies majors may choose from among a wide range of courses examining both global issues and major regions of the world.

The International Studies minor is of particular benefit to two groups of students. The first includes those who wish to engage in a focused program of coursework in international studies but who are majoring in disciplines that provide them with few opportunities to pursue this interest. The second includes those whose major fields allow them to explore aspects of the international system but who desire to broaden their studies to include perspectives of other disciplines or to focus more closely on particular regions of the world.

The International Studies curriculum is intended to prepare students for careers in an increasingly interdependent global environment. Professions that draw especially heavily on a background in international studies include business, communication, public service, education, diplomacy, journalism and law. Completing an international studies minor also serves as excellent preparation for graduate studies in international affairs.

International Studies majors and minors are encouraged to attend a study abroad program at Loyola’s Rome Center or at other universities throughout the world. Information about study abroad can be obtained from the Office for International Affairs.

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR

The curriculum leading to a major in International Studies consists of 33 semester hours of coursework (11 courses) and the fulfillment of a language proficiency requirement. Courses completed to satisfy the language requirement do not count toward the 33 semester hours of coursework. As many as three courses may simultaneously fulfill the requirements of the International Studies major and any other major in the College of Arts and Sciences.

Of the 11 courses leading to a major in international studies, all students are required to complete the following International Studies core courses:

  • INTS 101, Introduction to International Studies
  • INTS 257, International Politics (PLSC 102; PAX 102)
  • INTS 271, World Cultures (ANTH 271)
  • INTS 298, Contemporary Global Issues in Historical Perspective (HIST 299)
In addition to the core courses listed above, International Studies majors have the option of pursuing either a cultural and literary track; a political, historical and economic track; or a general curriculum. The courses in each of these tracks are included in the "Courses of Instruction" section. Students pursing the cultural and literary track must complete five courses from that list and two courses from either list. Students pursuing the political, historical, and economic track must complete five courses from that list and two courses from either list. Students pursuing the general curriculum must complete seven courses from either list. Of the seven non-core courses, one or more must be completed from at least two of the four geographic regions included in the program.

The language requirement for the major in International Studies may be satisfied in any of the following ways:

  • Successful completion (with a grade of "C" or better) of a 104-level or higher course in one of the languages offered by the Department of Modern Languages and Literatures.
  • Completion of a language proficiency examination or the equivalent, administered by the Department of Modern Languages and Literatures, demonstrating proficiency at the 104 level or higher.
  • Determination by the director of the international studies program, in consultation with appropriate specialists, that a student has at least a 104-level proficiency in reading and writing a language that is not taught or tested at Loyola.
DEGREE REQUIREMENTS FOR MAJOR IN INTERNATIONAL STUDIES (B.A.)
 
 
Courses
Credit Hrs.
International Studies 101, 257, 271, 298 and at least seven other International Studies courses as specified above
11
33
History core
2
6
English 105 and 106
2
6
Foreign language
up to 4
up to 12
Literature core
3
9
Mathematics core
1
3
Natural science core
3
9
Philosophy core
3
9
Theology core
3
9
Communicative/expressive arts core
1
3
Electives to complete minimum total of 128 credit hours
variable
variable
TOTAL
128 
 

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MINOR

The curriculum leading to a minor in International Studies consists of 18 credit hours of coursework (six courses) and the fulfillment of a language proficiency requirement. Courses completed to satisfy the language requirement do not count toward the 18 credit hours of coursework.

Of the 18 hours of coursework leading to a minor in International Studies, students must successfully complete (with a grade of "C" or better) all of the following:

  • INTS 101, an interdisciplinary overview of the field.
  • Two "general" courses focusing on various aspects of International Studies. The eligible courses are listed in the "Courses of Instruction" section.
  • Three regional studies courses focusing on Africa; Asia (including East Asia, South Asia, Southeast Asia and the Middle East); Eastern or Western Europe; or Latin America. No more than two of these courses may examine the same region. The eligible courses are listed in the "Courses of Instruction" section.
  • In order to ensure the interdisciplinary character of the program, no more than two courses eligible for International Studies minor credit may be taken in a single academic department, with the exception of courses used to fulfill the modern language requirement.
The language requirement for the minor in International Studies may be satisfied in any of the following ways:
  • Successful completion of three or more years of high school instruction in the same modern language, other than English.
  • Successful completion (with a grade of "C" or better) of a 103 level or higher course in one of the languages offered by the Department of Modern Language and Literatures.
  • Completion of a language proficiency examination or the equivalent, administered by the Department of Modern Languages and Literatures, demonstrating proficiency at the 103 level or higher.
  • Determination by the director of the International Studies program, in consultation with appropriate specialists, that a student has at least a 103-level proficiency in reading and writing a language that is not taught or tested at Loyola.
COURSES OF INSTRUCTION

101. Introduction to International Studies.
As an introduction to the multidisciplinary International Studies major and minor, this course provides an overview of the major disciplines represented in the program, introduces the main regions covered in the program and discusses several important global issues.

301. Capstone in International Studies.
This course focuses on a single issue area relevant to the concerns of the program, which will change from semester to semester. Depending upon the topic, the course will be assigned to either the cultural and literary or the political, historical and economic track at the time of scheduling.

370. Internship in International Studies.
The International Studies internship places International Studies majors in appropriate government agencies, non-government organizations, and businesses. This course offers up to six hours of academic credit, three of which count toward the 33 hours required for the major. The internship is not assigned to either International Studies track; it constitutes an elective in the program of students pursuing either track. Registration in the internship requires approval of the director of the International Studies program.

398. Special Topics in International Studies.
This course allows faculty participating in the international studies program to offer courses on special topics that do not appear among the courses listed below. These will ordinarily be cross-listed with other departments but might in some cases originate in the International Studies program.

399. Directed Readings in International Studies.
This course offers an independent program of research under the direction of a faculty sponsor leading to a major research paper. Registration for a directed readings course requires approval of the director of the International Studies program.

Cross-Listed Courses of Instruction

The following courses are cross-listed by the International Studies program and other departments and programs. For complete course descriptions, see the listings of the department in parenthesis.

Track I: Cultural and Literary Perspectives

GENERAL

120. Language, Ethnicity, Society. (LING 120)

213. Intercultural Communication. (CMUN 218)

253. International Mass Communication. (CMUN 253)

277. Religions of the World. (THEO 177) (RCS 277)

294. Introduction to Hinduism. (THEO 196) (ASIA 196) (RCS 296)

295. Introduction to Islam. (THEO 195) (ASIA 195) (RCS 295)

297. Introduction to Buddhism. (THEO 197) (ASIA 197) (RCS 297)

299. Comparative Literature. (LITR 299)

311. Border Literatures. (ENGL 313)

312. Studies in World Literature in English. (ENGL 312)

314. Identity, Race, Ethnicity and Nationalism. (ANTH 315)

317. African Literature in English. (ENGL 314) (BWS 384)

318. South Asian Literatures in English. (ENGL 315)

319. Anthropology of Tourism. (ANTH 319)

330. Liberation Theology. (THEO 330) (LASP 330) (PAX 332) (RCS 330)

AFRICA

214. Contemporary African Culture. (ANTH 213) (BWS 213) (RCS 213)

309. Francophone Literature. (FREN 309) (BWS 309)

355. Art of Africa and Oceania. (ANTH 345) (BWS 355) (FNAR 355)

ASIA

215. Contemporary Japanese Culture. (ANTH 215) (ASIA 215)

218. Cultures of Southeast Asia. (ANTH 218) (RCS 218) (ASIA 219)

287. Asian Literature. (LITR 287) (RCS 252)

334. Asian Philosophy. (ASIA 335) (PHIL 335) (RCS 335)

374. Art of China and Japan. (FNAR 356) (ASIA 356)

352. Topics in Buddhism. (THEO 352) (RCS 352) (ASIA 352)

387. Topics in Islam. (THEO 350) (RCS 350) (ASIA 350)

388. Topics in Hinduism. (THEO 351) (RCS 351) (ASIA 351)

396. Art of Indian Asia. (ASIA 357) (FNAR 357) (RCS 357)

EUROPE

273. The Orthodox Christian Tradition. (THEO 173) (RCS 273)

280. European Masterpieces. (LITR 280)

281. European Novel. (LITR 281)

282. European Drama. (LITR 282)

283. European Authors. (LITR 283)

284. European Film. (LITR 284)

309. Francophone Literature. (FREN 309) (BWS 309)

390. French Culture and Civilization. (FREN 390)

393. German Culture and Civilization. (GERM 390)

394. Italian Culture and Civilization. (ITAL 390)

397. Hispanic Culture and Civilization. (SPAN 390) (LASP 390) (when course focuses on Spain)

LATIN AMERICA

211. Peoples of Latin America. (ANTH 211) (LASP 211) (RCS 211)

217. Mexican Culture and Heritage. (ANTH 217) (LASP 217)

286. Latin American Literature. (LITR 286) (LASP 286)

383. Contemporary Latin American Novel. (SPAN 381) (LASP 381)

385. Pre-Columbian Art of Middle and South America. (ANTH 344) (FNAR 351) (LASP 357)

397. Culture and Civilization. (SPAN 390) (LASP 390) (when course focuses on Latin America)

Track II: Political, Historical and Economic Perspectives

GENERAL

104. Modern Western Civilization: The West and the World. (HIST 104)

305. Global Business Strategy. (MGMT 305)

306. International Business. (FINC 340) (MARK 340) (MGMT 340)

307. Global Marketing. (MARK 341)

315. International Management. (MGMT 315)

323. International Economics. (ECON 323)

324. International Monetary Relations. (ECON 324)

325. Economics of Development and Growth. (ECON 325)

326. Comparative Economics Systems. (ECON 326)

331. Media, Politics and Propaganda. (CMUN 330) (PAX 331)

341. Comparative Politics. (PLSC 341)

350. Politics of International Economic Relations. (PLSC 350)

353. International Law. (PAX 353) (PLSC 353)

354. Global Environmental Politics. (PLSC 354) (ESP 354) (PAX 354)

356. Intervention in World Politics. (PAX 356) (PLSC 356)

358. War, Peace and Politics. (PLSC 358) (PAX 358)

359. Inter-American Relations. (HIST 359) (LASP 349) (PAX 359)

362. Politics of Developing Societies. (PLSC 362)

363. International Marketing. (MARK 363)

364. United Nations and International Organizations. (PLSC 364) (PAX 364)

367. Model United Nations. (PLSC 367) (PAX 367)

369. International Financial Management. (FINC 355)

375. American Foreign Policy. (PLSC 325)

384. Revolutions. (PLSC 359)

AFRICA

340. International Relations of Africa. (PLSC 340) (BWS 340)

342. African Politics. (PLSC 342) (BWS 342)

351. African History Post-1600. (HIST 351) (BWS 387)

378. African History to 1600. (HIST 350) (BWS 386)

ASIA

202. Introduction to Asian and Asian American Studies. (ASIA 101)

296. Women in East Asia. (HIST 296) (ASIA 296) (WOST 296)

313. The Modern Middle East. (HIST 313) (RCS 313)

322. Arab Israeli Conflict. (HIST 322)

345. South and Southeast Asian Politics. (PLSC 345) (ASIA 343)

346. East Asian Politics. (PLSC 346) (ASIA 342)

347. Japan 1640-1945: From Isolation to Empire. (HIST 347) (ASIA 347)

348. Japan Since 1945: From Ashes to Economics Success. (HIST 348) (ASIA 348)

371. Early Modern China, 1500 1800. (HIST 344) (ASIA 344)

372. Reform and Revolution in China, 1800-1949. (HIST 345) (ASIA 345)

373. China Since 1949: The People’s Republic. (HIST 346) (ASIA 346)

EUROPE

302. Italy: Culture and Contexts. (ROST 300)

327. Contemporary Europe, 1945 to the Present. (HIST 327)

332. The British Empire, 1783-1970. (HIST 332)

333. Ireland: From Colony to Nation State. (HIST 333)

335. Italy in the Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries. (HIST 335) (ROST 335)

336. Germany in the Twentieth Century. (HIST 336)

338. Modern France. (HIST 338)

349. Eastern European Politics. (PLSC 349)

360. Western European Politics. (PLSC 360)

365. Italian Politics and Government. (PLSC 365) (ROST 365)

376. Europe in the Twentieth Century, 1900-1945. (HIST 325)

381. The European Union. (PLSC 347)

382. Soviet and Post-Soviet Politics. (PLSC 348)

392. Rise and Fall of the Soviet Union. (HIST 341)

LATIN AMERICA

201. Introduction to Latin American Studies. (LASP 101)

343. Latin American Politics. (PLSC 343) (LASP 343)

344. Contemporary Issues in Latin America. (PLSC 344) (LASP 344)

379. Mexican History from Ancient to Modern Times. (HIST 357) (LASP 355)

380. The Caribbean and Central America in Colonial and Modern Times. (HIST 356) (LASP 354)

389. Latin America in Recent Times. (HIST 355) (LASP 353)

395. Latin America in the International System. (PLSC 351) (LASP 341)

OTHER

320. Canadian Politics. (PLSC 352)

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