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Undergraduate Studies Catalog

DEPARTMENT OF PSYCHOLOGY (PSYC)

Lake Shore Campus:
Damen Hall 624
Phone: 773-508-3001
FAX: 773-508-8713

Water Tower Campus:
Lewis Towers 900
Phone: 312-915-6530
FAX: 312-915-8593
www.luc.edu/depts/psychology

Professors Emeriti: A. DeWolfe, J. Foley, D. Holmes, E. Kennedy, F. Kobler, R.C. Nicolay, M. O’Brien, C.S.V., R. Pugh, J. Rychlak, R. Walker, L. Wauck

Professors: R. Bowen, F. Bryant, I. Crawford (chairperson), J. Durlak, R. Fay, L. Heath, G. Holmbeck, J. Johnson, F. Morrison, D. O’Connell, S.J., T. Petzel, E. Posavac, M. Richards, R. Russell, S. Tindale, E. Zechmeister

Associate Professors: D. Davidson, R. Dye, J. Edwards, L. Leidahl-Marsh, V. Ottati, P. Rupert, Y. Suarez-Balcazar, A. Sutter, J. Zechmeister

Assistant Professors: C. Haden, S. Li

Adjunct Professors: J. Sinacore, W. Yost

Clinical Associate Professor: D. Barnes

Clinical Assistant Professor: J. Wagner

The Department of Psychology offers two undergraduate degree programs: the bachelor of science in natural sciences and the bachelor of science in social sciences. Psychology courses necessary to complete both majors typically are offered at both Water Tower and Lake Shore campuses, although availability of specific courses may vary between campuses. Students pursuing a natural science emphasis in psychology will find that ancillary courses in the natural sciences are offered mainly at the Lake Shore Campus.

COLLEGE CORE REQUIREMENT

Students not majoring or minoring in psychology or other social sciences can take PSYC 101 and 273, 275, 331, or 338 to fulfill the social science core requirement. All students may take as many psychology courses as they desire as general electives. Psychology majors automatically fulfill the College of Arts and Sciences social science core requirement.

OBJECTIVES

Psychology is both a scientific field of study of behavior and experience, and a profession that applies psychological principles to solving individual and social problems. The courses are designed to: (1) contribute meaningfully to the liberal education of students; (2) provide a substantial and broadly applicable background for a wide variety of careers with a bachelor’s degree; (3) serve as a foundation for advanced study in various areas of specialization within psychology and other professional fields such as medicine, law, business, and social work; (4) foster research in the many areas of theoretical and applied psychology; and (5) stimulate the application of a psychological perspective to one’s personal life, work and other aspects of daily experience.

Within the psychology major, the bachelor of science in natural sciences is aimed at providing the psychology student a focus in the basic natural sciences, particularly biology, through a sequence of relevant lecture and laboratory courses. The bachelor of science in the social sciences links the major through coursework with complementary social science disciplines such as anthropology, political science and sociology.

Requirements for the Major in Psychology: All psychology majors must complete a minimum of 12 courses in psychology totaling 36 semester hours. Other requirements for the major depend upon which of the two degree programs is undertaken. Each degree has "core" requirements designed to provide the same broad background in psychology. Other psychology courses may be selected according to interests and career goals in consultation with an academic advisor. Students majoring in psychology should obtain the Psychology Department Undergraduate Handbook from their advisors. Additional information can be found at the department web site: www.luc.edu/depts/psychology. The degree requirements for each major are described in the following sections. Each major leads to the bachelor of science (B.S.) degree.

DEGREE REQUIREMENTS FOR MAJOR IN PSYCHOLOGY

(Natural Sciences, B.S.)

 

Courses

Credit Hrs.

Psychology 101, 304, 306, two Group A courses, two Group B courses, one laboratory course, one capstone course, and additional psychology courses in the 200 and 300-series

12

36

Mathematics (See Notes)

2

6

Biology 101, 111 and 102, 112

2

8

Science electives (laboratory courses)

2

8

History core

2

6

English 105 and 106

2

6

Foreign language

2

6

Literature core

3

9

Philosophy core

3

9

Theology core

3

9

Communicative/expressive arts core

1

3

Electives to complete minimum total of 128 credit hours

variable

22

TOTAL

 

128

DEGREE REQUIREMENTS FOR MAJOR IN PSYCHOLOGY

(Social Sciences B.S.)

 

Courses

Credit Hrs.

Psychology 101, 304, 306, two Group A courses, two Group B courses, one laboratory course, one capstone course, and additional psychology courses in the 200 and 300-series

12

36

Mathematics (see Notes)

2

6

Social science electives

3

9

History core

2

6

English 105 and 106

2

6

Foreign language

2

6

Literature core

3

9

Natural science core

3

9

Philosophy core

3

9

Theology core

3

9

Communicative/expressive arts core

1

3

Electives to complete minimum total of 128 credit hours

variable

20

TOTAL

 

128

NOTES ON THE CURRICULA

Psychology Requirements: In addition to PSYC 101, 304 and 306, students are required to takes at least two courses from Group A and at least two courses from Group B as listed below.

Group A courses
Lecture Courses: 240, 250, 251, 301, 305, 307.

Laboratory Courses: 311, 314, 316.

Group B courses
Lecture Courses: 273, 275, 331, 338.

Laboratory Courses: 310, 315, 318, 321, 325.

One laboratory course is required. Taking a second laboratory course fulfills the capstone requirement.

Although taking a laboratory course simultaneously fulfills one of the Group A or Group B requirements, this dual fulfillment of requirements does not reduce the 12 psychology courses requirement for the major. Grades of "C" or better must be earned in all 12 psychology courses used to fulfill the requirements for the major.

Capstone Courses
One capstone course is required for the major. Students may choose from the following: second psychology laboratory course (including PSYC 389-lab in neuroscience), PSYC 370 (honors research), PSYC 397 (independent research), PSYC 390 (internship in human services), or PSYC 392 (internship in applied psychology).

Transfer Credit: Psychology courses taken at other universities and colleges are not accepted toward the major unless they are comparable to courses in Loyola’s Psychology Department curriculum. Transfer students must meet with the Psychology Department undergraduate program director in order to see which courses will count toward their Loyola psychology major. IN ALL CASES A MINIMUM OF SIX PSYCHOLOGY COURSES (HALF THE MAJOR) MUST BE COMPLETED AT LOYOLA, regardless of the number of psychology courses taken elsewhere. Acceptance of other requirements for the major (e.g., math, social science, natural science) is at the discretion of the undergraduate program director.

Sequence of Courses: After beginning with 101, it is desirable to take one or two Group A or Group B lecture courses before proceeding to 304 and then 306. It is strongly recommended that students also complete the ancillary math requirement prior to 304. Since 304 and 306 and occasionally additional lecture courses are prerequisites for all laboratory courses, the laboratory course will ordinarily not be taken until the junior and senior years. The capstone course is taken senior year; however, students should note that 300 (practicum) is a prerequisite for capstone internship courses (390, 392) and should be taken 2nd or 3rd year if a senior internship course is desired. Consult with your advisor for assistance in planning each semester.

Mathematics: Two courses selected from the following: MATH 108, 117, 118, 131, 132, 161, 162; COMP 125, 170; STAT 103. With departmental permission, students may substitute comparable or higher level mathematics courses for those listed here. PSYC 381 MAY APPLY TOWARD ONE OF THE MATHEMATICS REQUIREMENTS; IN THIS CASE IT WILL NOT APPLY AS ONE OF THE TWELVE COURSES REQUIRED IN THE MAJOR. Completion of COMP 125, 170; MATH 108, 131, 161; or STAT 103 also fulfills the mathematics core requirement of the College of Arts and Sciences.

Variable Topics Courses: Variable topics courses (398 and 399) may be taken more than once. However, each variable topics course may be used only ONCE toward the 12 courses required for the major. For example, a student may satisfy the major requirements by taking one 398, one 399, and ten other psychology courses.

Internship Courses: Only one internship course (390, 392) may be counted toward the 12 courses required for the major.

Natural Sciences Major: In addition to BIOL 101, 111 and 102, 112, students are required to take two additional laboratory science courses (8 hours) selected from biology, chemistry, physics or, with departmental permission, additional courses in mathematics. These courses fulfill the college’s natural science core requirement.

Social Sciences Major: Three social science electives (9 hours) taken from one or more of the following areas are required: anthropology; business administration (MARK, MGMT); criminal justice; economics; education (with social science content); political science; social work; and sociology.

Requirements for the Minor Sequence in Psychology: The minor sequence in psychology consists of 101, 304, and four other courses in the 200- and 300-series. Students declare a minor by completing the appropriate form available in the dean’s office. At least three of the courses taken for the minor must be taken at Loyola. Grades of "C" or better must be earned in all minor courses.

Note: Students majoring in other social sciences (e.g., criminal justice, sociology) and who have already taken a statistics course as part of their major requirements may, with permission of the psychology undergraduate program director, substitute another statistics course for PSYC 304 to apply to the psychology minor. However, only Psychology 304 is acceptable for the major in psychology.

Requirements for the Interdisciplinary Minor in the Psychology of Crime & Justice: The minor requires six courses, including PSYC 372 and CRMJ 322. Psychology majors need 4 criminal justice and 2 psychology courses (in addition to the 12 psychology classes for the major). Criminal justice majors need 4 psychology and 2 criminal justice classes (in addition to the 12 criminal justice classes for the major). Non-majors need 3 psychology and 3 criminal justice classes. See description of the minor on page 161.

Requirements for the Psychology Honors Award Program: Psychology majors who are members in good standing of the university honors program or students who have maintained high grades and have been approved by the departmental honors committee may participate in the honors award program. Students in this program must take a minimum of 13 psychology courses including those required in their degree program plus 369 and 370. In 369 the student does concentrated, individualized reading in a topic area of personal interest and prepares a formal research proposal. In 370 the student carries out the research and prepares a formal report that constitutes the honors thesis. Students are strongly encouraged to register for PSYC 369 by the second semester of the junior year, but no later than the first semester of the senior year. The psychology honors award is conferred upon approval of the thesis by the student’s thesis committee. Further information, applications, and registration approval forms for 369 and 370 are obtainable from the department’s honors advisor. PSYC 370 satisfies the capstone requirement; however, students must still complete two Group A and two Group B courses as part of the 13-course honors degree.

Requirements for Certification for Teaching Psychology in High Schools: Students who major in psychology may be eligible for teaching psychology and/or other social science topics in secondary schools. For information on teacher certification requirements, see page XX in this catalog.

Five Year BS/MA Program in Applied Social Psychology: The program allows students to earn both a B.S. degree in psychology and an M.A. degree in applied social psychology in five years. The M.A. in applied social psychology provides training which allows students to seek employment as researchers in a variety of settings: marketing, advertising, education, criminal justice, community intervention, healthcare, etc. Psychology majors with a 3.5 GPA are eligible to apply. Admitted students may apply up to nine hours of graduate credit earned toward the 128 semester hours needed for the B.S. degree. Successful completion of 30 hours of graduate courses and an empirical thesis are necessary for the M.A. degree (see The Graduate School catalog for a complete description of the M.A. degree requirements). Students should officially apply to the program in the spring semester of their junior year, and if admitted, begin taking graduate courses in their senior year. However, students would retain their undergraduate status until they complete the requisite 128 hours. Students will obtain official graduate standing and complete the graduate program in their fifth year. All relevant admissions requirements for the M.A. program apply.

Students who might be interested in this program are strongly urged to contact the graduate program director for applied social psychology (currently Dr. Scott Tindale, DH 660, 508-3014, rtindal@luc.edu) early in their undergraduate careers (preferably in their first year) to receive help with appropriate course scheduling.

COURSES OF INSTRUCTION

(Note: PSYC 101 is a prerequisite for all other psychology courses.)

101. General Psychology.
Basic concepts and methods of psychology. Primary emphasis on the scientific study of consciousness and human behavior. Topics include: human development, personality, learning, thinking, perception, testing, mental illness and mental health, and biological and social aspects of behavior.

230. Parenting Across the Lifespan. (WOST 230)
Psychological aspects of parenting are reviewed from the perspectives of both parent and child with consideration given to the effect of developmental, social, and cultural forces. Lectures and exercises are combined in order to evaluate relevant theories and research from both the academic and personal perspectives.

235. Psychology of Human Sexuality.
Sexuality as an important aspect of human functioning and its integration into the total person will be emphasized. Topics include: the biological, psychological and sociocultural aspects of human sexuality, along with sexual dysfunction, and sex roles.

238. Gender and Sex Differences and Similarities. (WOST 238)
Consideration of theory and research related to the differences between males and females resulting from biological factors, learning, and social roles. Topics include traditional and non-traditional roles, role strain, social and psychological factors influencing role choice, and implications for adults’ interpersonal, parental, and work orientations.

240. Psychology and Biology of Perception. (BIOL 240)
Consideration of the major sensory and perceptual systems of humans and animals emphasizing: (1) historical development of the field; (2) multi-disciplinary scientific approaches; (3) recent research and theory on the mechanisms of seeing, hearing and other sensory processes; and (4) applications of these results to medical diagnosis and treatment and to other areas such as noise pollution, speech perception, and aesthetics. Group A.

250. Cognitive Psychology.
Overview of cognitive psychology. Topics include: human information processing, storage and retrieval processes, mental imagery, language, thinking, artificial intelligence, pattern recognition, and problem solving. Group A.

251. Learning and Behavior.
Introduction to the understanding of behavior based on principles of learning and behavior control derived from the study of classical and instrumental (operant) conditioning. Interactions between innate dispositions and experimental factors are discussed, as is the application of conditioning-learning principles to such areas as behavior therapy, education, and self-control. Group A.

273. Developmental Psychology. (CPSY 273)
Survey of theory and research relevant to human growth and development with emphasis on personality, maturation, and learning. Group B.

275. Social Psychology.
Analysis of human thoughts, feelings and actions as influenced by other people. Topics include: socialization, perception of self and others, prosocial and antisocial behavior, attitudes, interpersonal attraction, social influence, and group behavior. Group B.

300. Practicum in Psychology.
Prerequisites: Sophomore/junior psychology majors; instructor’s permission.

Opportunity to gain practical experience in community social service agencies. Students volunteer in an approved agency of their choice for a minimum of six hours per week of supervised work related to their psychology major. Students also participate in seminars with speakers and small group sessions discussing their experiences. PSYC 300 is a service learning course and is also a prerequisite for psychology internship courses 390 and 392.

301. Comparative Psychology.
A comparative study of animal behavior with an emphasis on ecology, evolution, and underlying mechanisms. Foraging behavior, defense against predation, reproduction, social behavior, learning, and cognition will be included. Group A.

302. History and Systems in Psychology.
A systematic treatment of the historical roots and foundation of psychology. Special emphasis is placed on relating past trends to current developments.

304. Statistics.
Previous math courses recommended. Fundamentals of statistical analysis in psychology and education. Topics include: frequency distribution, central tendency, variability, graphical presentation, normal distribution, correlation, sampling distributions, and tests of statistical significance including analysis of variance.

305. Brain and Behavior. (BIOL 241)
Prerequisite: PSYC 101 or BIOL 102.
Historical and theoretical foci with consideration of: (1) basic anatomy of the nervous system and the physiology of nerve cells; (2) representation in the brain and production of motor behavior; and (3) neural mechanisms of selected "high mental functions" such as learning, memory, psychopathology, perception, motivation, emotion, sleep, and arousal. Group A.

306. Research Methods in Psychology.
Prerequisite: PSYC 304.
Logic and theory of the scientific method. Basic statistics and principles of research methodologies employed in approaching major problem areas in psychology.

307. Psychology of Language.
Analysis of language as symbol-behavior specific to humans, language structure and competence, language performance, and the neurophysiological basis of language. Methods for investigating language processing, acquisition, bilingualism, and language disorders will be considered. Group A.

310. Laboratory in Program Evaluation.
Prerequisite: PSYC 306; PSYC 275 recommended.
Special attention is given to the fundamental skills needed to evaluate human service programs including research methodology and research diplomacy. The strengths and weaknesses of several evaluation strategies will be discussed in terms of scientific validity, ethical constraints, and political acceptability. Students will receive an opportunity to apply their developing evaluation skills. Group B.

311. Laboratory in Psychobiology. (BIOL 313)
Prerequisites: PSYC 306; and PSYC 240 or PSYC 305.
Introduces the advanced undergraduate to concepts and techniques used in investigations of nervous system function. The laboratory focus is on the measurement of computer-simulated activity, computer applications to neurobiological data analysis, and the presentation of independent student research. Group A.

314. Laboratory in Experimental Psychology: Cognition.
Prerequisites: PSYC 306, PSYC 250.
Laboratory demonstrations, experiments, and microcomputer applications in the area of human cognition. Topics vary, but include learning, memory, thinking and language processing. Experimental design, measurement, and statistical analyses as they relate to research on human cognition. Group A.

315. Laboratory in Tests and Measurements.
Prerequisite: PSYC 306; PSYC 331 or PSYC 338 recommended.
Covers standardization, reliability, and validity in the context of testing; problems in the evaluation and use of tests in applied settings; characteristics of major types of tests. Students prepare, analyze, and compose projects in test construction. Several ability and personality tests are administered. Group B.

316. Laboratory in Experimental Psychology: Sensation and Perception.
Prerequisites: PSYC 306; PSYC 240 or PSYC 305.
Laboratory demonstrations, experiments, and microcomputer applications to the psychophysical and physiological study of sensory systems. The course stresses the research methods and quantitative measures that are used in characterizing sensory processes, especially visual and auditory systems. Group A.

318. Laboratory in Developmental Psychology.
Prerequisites: PSYC 306, PSYC 273.
Lectures and laboratory on empirical investigations of human behavior as a function of the developmental process. Focus is on research within particular developmental stages (e.g., infancy, childhood, adolescence, adulthood) as well as research examining changes in behavior across ages. Group B.

321. Laboratory in Social Psychology.
Prerequisites: PSYC 306, PSYC 275.
Lectures, demonstrations, readings, and individual or group research projects illustrating various methods, such as observation, interviewing, archives, standardized tests, and experimentation, are used to learn about topics such as group influences on the individual, attitudes, prosocial and antisocial behavior, and perception of self and others. Group B.

325. Laboratory in Experimental Personality.
Prerequisite: PSYC 306; PSYC 331 or PSYC 338 recommended.
Lectures and laboratory on empirical investigations of aspects of personality. Stress on methodology and selected areas of personality research (e.g., affiliation, the development of personality, self- restraint). Group B.

331. Abnormal Psychology. (CPSY 333)
Nature and causes of maladjustment and mental disorders. History of mental illness, diagnosis, research, and treatment of mental disorders. Group B.

338. Psychology of Personality. (CPSY 338)
Facts and principles of personality study. Nature of personality, its structure, development, expression, and measurement. Exposition and evaluation of personality study methods with critical review of traditional and modern theories of personality. Group B.

340. Psychology of Women. (WOST 340)
Review of psychological aspects of women’s experiences. Topics include psychological aspects of biological events such as menarche, pregnancy, menopause; aspects of women’s work and family roles; and mental health issues relevant to women. This course is for anyone who wants to learn about these issues.

344. Principles of Behavioral Change.
Psychological principles and techniques as applied to the development and maintenance of adaptive and growth-enhancing human behavior. Exposure to a variety of change agent methods including anxiety and habit control, social skill training, reinforcement techniques as well as thought pattern modification (through demonstrations and exercises). Applications of those approaches to self-control, individual and group counseling, child and family systems intervention, and organizational design and management.

346. Psychopathology of Childhood.
Prerequisite: PSYC 273.
Consideration of nature and causes of maladjustment, emotional disorders, and learning disabilities in children in conjunction with approaches to prevention and remediation.

348. Psychology of Adolescence.
Prerequisite: PSYC 273.
Consideration of the important theories and issues within this period of development, such as juvenile delinquency, sex-role identity, and parent and peer group relationships.

349. Maturity and Aging.
Prerequisite: PSYC 273.
Overview of theory and research relevant to middle age and aging. Topics include personality, cognitive and social functioning as well as biological functioning. Applications to life situations, such as living arrangements, provision of health services, and retirement, are discussed.

353. Applied Social Psychology.
Prerequisite: PSYC 275.
Applications of principles and methods of social psychology to social issues and problems in such areas as: law and justice, health and health care, education, natural and built environments, population, work life and intergroup relations.

356. Consumer Psychology.
Introduction to the study of consumer behavior. Focus on the psychology of advertising, including (a) advertising techniques effective in influencing consumer attitudes and behavior, and (b) the psychological processes whereby a given advertising technique influences consumer attitudes. Also a focus on consumer decision making: the psychological process whereby consumers arrive at a purchasing decision.

362. Industrial/Organizational Psychology.
Study of human behavior in work settings. Topics include principles of employee selection, job analysis, motivation and morale, managerial behavior, organization development and socialization, leadership, conflict management, work design and group process.

368. Counseling I. (PSYC 331 or PSYC 338 recommended)
Introduction to the principles, theories, and techniques of therapeutic counseling including the clinical interview and use of the case history, individual and group approaches.

369H. Honors Reading.
Prerequisites: membership in the psychology honors award program or in the college honors program; and approval of the department honors advisor.

Directed readings and formal research proposal on a topic of interest to the student and the faculty member with whom he/she has chosen to work. Students are not restricted to working with the faculty member whose name is listed in the schedule of classes.

370H. Honors Research.
Prerequisite: PSYC 369.
Students carry out the research proposed in PSYC 369 and prepare a formal report constituting the honors thesis. Approval of the thesis by the honors committee earns the psychology honors award. PSYC 370 is a capstone course.

372. Psychology and Law.
Reviews the overlap between the fields of psychology and law, including such areas as repressed memories, eyewitness testimony, scientific jury selection, insanity defense, crime causation, battered spouse defense, and death-qualified juries.

373. Health Psychology.
Health psychology is the field within psychology devoted to understanding psychological and behavioral influences on how people stay healthy, why they become ill, and how they respond when they do become ill. This course offers an overview of this rapidly growing area of psychology. Topics covered include: health behavior and primary prevention, stress and coping, patient-physician interaction, and management of chronic illness. Students will develop a better understanding of the structure of the health care system and the various roles psychologists may play in this system.

375. Psychology of Addiction.
Survey of historical, demographical, and statistical aspects of substance abuse. Abuse of alcohol and drugs, as well as eating disorders, may be considered. A variety of theoretical models (e.g., psychopharmacological, personality, psychodynamic, and sociological) are discussed. Individual, milieu, family, group, behavior modification, and drug therapies are described.

378. Group Dynamics and Interpersonal Relations.
This course has both didactic and experiential components. The didactic component includes a review of the basic principles of small group processes. Issues addressed include leadership styles, group-member relations, communication patterns, conflict resolution, goal-setting, and decision-making. The experiential component includes systematic training in interpersonal communication skills within the small group context.

381. Advanced Statistical Analysis with Computers for the Social Sciences.
Prerequisite: PSYC 304 or equivalent social science statistics.

Expanded treatment of topics covered in 304 with emphasis on using standard computer analysis packages. No previous computer or programming experience is required.

388. Laboratory in Neuroscience I (BIOL 373; NEUR 301; PSYC 331 recommended).

389. Laboratory in Neuroscience II (BIOL 374; NEUR 302; PSYC 331 recommended).

390. Internship in Human Services.
Prerequisites: PSYC 300, senior psychology major; approval of internship coordinator.
After discussion with the internship coordinator, students are placed in relevant social service agencies, such as adolescent crisis centers, nursing homes, homeless shelters, hospitals, and mental health facilities. Students contract to work for a minimum of 100 hours in an agency and are required to prepare a portfolio integrating their experience with the major. PSYC 390 is a capstone course; it may be taken only one time.

392. Internship in Applied Psychology.
Prerequisites: PSYC 300, PSYC 306, senior psychology major, approval of internship coordinator.
After discussion with the internship coordinator, students are placed in relevant work settings. Students contract to work for a minimum of 100 hours in return for supervised training in specified areas. Placements are in mental health, applied developmental and industrial settings. A written research report is required of all students. PSYC 392 is a capstone course; it may be taken only one time.

397. Independent Research.
Prerequisites: PSYC 306; senior psychology major; department and instructor permission.
An opportunity for students to conduct independent research under the guidance of a psychology faculty member. A written research report is required of all students. PSYC 397 is a capstone course; it may be taken only one time.

398. Psychology Seminar: Selected Topics.
An upper-level, intensive seminar on selected aspects of psychology. The instructor presents an area in which he/she has a special interest and expertise and for which student interest has been expressed. Topics and instructors vary each semester.

399. Special Studies in Psychology.
Prerequisites: department and instructor permission.
Opportunity for individual reading or research in a specialized area not otherwise covered by the department’s course offerings. Students are not restricted to working with the faculty member whose name is listed in the schedule of classes.

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