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Undergraduate Studies Catalog

DEPARTMENT OF THEATRE (THTR)

Lake Shore Campus:
Skyscraper 810
Phone: 773-508-3830
FAX: 773-508-8748
www.luc.edu/depts/theatre

Professor Emeritus: N. Patricca, D. Zacek

Professors: J. Trahey, J. Wilson

Associate Professors: S. Gabel (chairperson)

Assistant Professor:J. Firkins

Adjunct Professors: S. Applebaum, C. Craig, R. Kornick, N. Withers-Wilson

Instructor:A. Shanahan

The major in theatre is offered only at the Lake Shore Campus.

OBJECTIVES

It is the goal of the theatre department to provide a liberal arts education for the professional, community and academic theatres. Many of our students pursue theatre as a profession after graduation but the theatre major program also serves as a means of acquiring a liberal education similar in nature to such fields as English, classics, philosophy or history.

By fostering an environment which supports the search for truth and respect for the human person, the Department of Theatre encourages its students to develop critical and ethical perspectives in their preparation for life. Through academic and performance studies, we seek to affirm our studentsí ability to learn, to develop their unique creative potential, and to encourage their commitment to sharing their knowledge and creative talents with others. Of all the arts, theatre provides the most concrete expression of the customs, values, manners and morals of any given society at any given time. Theatre is one of the most communal of art forms. By exploring the works of the greatest poets and playwrights; through discussion of aesthetic, moral and social issues; by enriching our cultural heritage and traditions through the performance of works by new artists we serve our university and our community.

DEPARTMENT REGULATIONS

Requirements for the Major: The required curriculum for theatre majors consists of 30 hours of specified coursework and 12 hours of electives. It is hoped that the student will take more than his/her minimum of six hours of advanced courses. Required courses should be taken in the following sequence:

1st year: 203, 252, 253, 256, 266, 321 (2 hours).

2nd year: 257, 268, 321 (2 hours), 365, or 366 or 367.

3rd year: 321 (2 hours), 375, electives.

4th year: electives.

Two of the following three courses, 365, 366, 367, must be taken between year 2 and year 4.

Requirements for the Minor: Requirements for the minor consist of 21 hours of courses as follows: THTR 203, 252, 266, and 321 (3 hours) selected with the permission of the chairperson.

Honors Requirements in Theatre: Departmental honors consists of a directed reading program of one book per month for six semesters to be discussed at the end of each month with a faculty member of the department. Members of the departmental honors program are asked to report their readings each month to the honors advisor of the department.

If a theatre major elects to take both departmental honors and university honors, the university honors program will elect to waive his/her one required honors course in theatre in lieu of the work done in departmental honors. Such a student is expected to begin departmental honors the same semester he/she begins university honors.

COURSES OF INSTRUCTION

100. Introduction to the Theatre Experience.
The intent of this course is to introduce the student to the world of the theatre. Students will investigate the theatreís function in society, the artists who are involved in it, and the various theatrical components which make up the art form. Students will also experience the theatre by participating in creative theatrical projects.

203. Dramatic Structure and Theatrical Process.
This course introduces the student to the basic methods of analyzing and interpreting plays representative of the modern stage (from Ibsen to the present). The study of the theatre is the study of performance and the chief blueprint for production is the text. An analysis of the play text is a critical first step toward understanding both the performance of a play and the means by which that performance is created. This course focuses on the dynamic interplay, essential to the collaborative nature of theatre between structure and content, text and performance.

205. Theatre in Chicago I.
Weekly attendance at professional, semi-professional, community and academic theatre offerings in the Chicago area, supplemented by selected readings. Students meet with the instructor to discuss the significance of what they have seen. Students enrolled are responsible for the cost of theatre tickets. This course may be repeated one time (THTR 207).

207. Theatre in Chicago II.
Weekly attendance at professional, semi-professional, community, and academic theatre offerings in the Chicago area, supplemented by selected readings. Students meet with instructor to discuss the significance of what they have seen. Students are responsible for the cost of theatre tickets. (This course enables those who have taken 205 to repeat the course for credit.)

241. Voice and Diction for the Stage I.
Through in-class exercises, students gain greater knowledge and control over the techniques necessary for healthy and effective voice and speech production: breath support, tonal placement, resonance building, projection, articulatory clarity, vowel and consonant formation, the international phonetic alphabet, and language coloration.

242. Introduction to Singing I.
A course for the beginning student emphasizing the identification of musical symbols, the development of vocalists (vocal exercises), the training of the voice through simple songs, and the development of an understanding of the studentís personal vocal instrument.

243. Introduction to Singing II.
Prerequisite: 242 or prior musical training and written permission of instructor.
A continuation of 242.

244. Voice and Diction for the Stage II.
Prerequisite: 241.
Advanced workshop in which the demands placed upon the voice by the various styles and periods of dramatic literature are analyzed.

252. Introduction to Theatrical Design.
This course introduces the theatre student to the fundamentals of design especially as they relate to the theatrical design of sets, lights, and costumes. The student will be introduced to the ways in which set, lighting and costume designers express their ideas to the rest of the production team.

253. Crafts for the Stage.
A survey course in: 1) the construction of basic stage scenery; 2) the principles and equipment of rigging and scene shifting; 3) basic concepts of lighting and the hanging and focusing of stage lights. There will be an additional one hour laboratory period each week.

256. History of the Theatre I.
Prerequisite: 203.
A survey course in the development of the theatre from its beginnings to the end of the Jacobean/Caroline period.

257. History of the Theatre II.
Prerequisite: 203.
A survey course in the development of the theatre and drama from the French Renaissance to the present.

261. Beginning Acting.
A lecture-performance course for non-majors in the basic principles and techniques of acting. Included is work in such areas as the actorís physical tools, concentration, relaxation, sensory responsiveness, emotional recall and motivational units. Particular attention will be paid to the physical technique of the actor.

266. Acting Theories and Technique.
A lecture-performance course in the basic principles and techniques of acting. Included is work in such areas as the actorís physical tools, concentration, relaxation, sensory responsiveness, emotional recall and motivational units. This course is intended for majors.

268. Characterization for the Stage I.
Prerequisite: 266.
A lecture-performance course emphasizing the use of language in the development of character for scene work.

269. Characterization for the Stage II.
Prerequisite: 268.
The course emphasizes the analysis of a text into actions, the discovery of subtext and the development of character for scene work.

300. Theatre Technology I.
Prerequisite: 252, 253.
Fundamental design principles and practices including basic construction and drafting for the stage, basic color theory, and the maintenance and presentation of a sketch book. In addition to the regular three class hours, there will be a one-hour laboratory period each week.

321. Theater Practicum (1 hour)
A minimum of forty hours of production work in scene construction, costume construction, properties, make-up, running crews, house staff or box office for the Theatre Departmentís productions. Students may not take anymore than 1 hour of 321 in any given semester and no more than 8 hours of 321 can be counted towards the major. It is open to all students.

323. Rehearsal and Performance.
Students taking this course receive credit for production work done during the preceding semester upon completion and submission of a journal and a paper. The journal serves to record growth and experiences; the paper provides the opportunity to reflect upon both from a distance in time.

324. Practicum in Design.
This course gives three credit hours to the student scene, costume, lighting, make-up, or property designer. Grades are based on quality of work performed, submission of all pertinent design work and a journal. A faculty critique of the design work will be held with the student designer. The journal serves to record growth and experiences. The critique serves to give an objective view of the design by the faculty. This practicum is repeatable with the Chairís permission.

325. Costume Design I.
A lecture-laboratory course in the planning, design and execution of costumes for the stage. Students are required to complete a series of design projects emphasizing figure sketching, silhouette, color, texture, and line.

326. Costume Design II.
Prerequisite: 325.
A lecture-laboratory course in the planning and construction of costumes for the stage. Students are required to complete a series of design projects in which emphasis will be given to such areas as style, pattern drafting and construction techniques.

328. Stage Lighting: Theories and Techniques I.
A study of the theories and techniques of modern stage lighting as a design asset to play production. Emphasis will be given to such areas as instrumentation, intensity controls, and lighting designs.

329. Stage Make-up: Theories and Techniques.
A study of the theories and techniques of stage make-up as a technical asset to play production. Emphasis will be given to such areas as straight make-up, character make-up, and special effects through make-up.

330. Stage-Lighting: Theories and Techniques II.
Prerequisite: 328.
Advanced study of the theories and techniques of modern stage lighting as an asset to play production. Emphasis will be given to such areas as instrumentation, intensity controls, and lighting designs.

331. Movement: Theories and Techniques.
Workshop course in major theories and techniques of movement. Emphasis given to physical elements of control and awareness.

365. Dramatic Literature I.
Prerequisite: 257.
A study of dramatic literature from ancient times to the Renaissance with particular emphasis on the relationship between script and production within a given historical period.

366. Dramatic Literature II.
Prerequisite: 257.
A study of dramatic literature from the Renaissance to the end of the nineteenth century with particular emphasis on the relationship between script and production within a given historical period.

367. Dramatic Literature III.
Prerequisite: 257.
A study of European dramatic literature from the end of the nineteenth century to the present time with particular emphasis on the relationship between script and production within a given historical period.

368. Seminar in Acting I.
Prerequisite: 269.
A lecture-performance course specializing in scene work from genres and periods suitable to the acting needs of individual students.

369. Seminar in Acting II.
Prerequisite: 368.
A lecture-performance course specializing in scene work of genres and periods suitable to the acting needs of individual students.

371. Stage Design I.
An advanced lecture-laboratory course dealing with the planning and fabrication of stage scenery. Students are required to complete a series of design projects in which emphasis will be given to such areas as design source material, principles and techniques of scene design, and rendering techniques.

372. Stage Design II.
Prerequisite: 371.
An advanced lecture-laboratory course dealing with the planning and fabrication of stage scenery. Students must complete a series of design projects emphasizing such areas as principles and techniques of scene design, approaches and methods of important scenic designers, and scenic model construction.

375. Play Direction.
Prerequisites: 203, 252, 256, 257, 268, 365 or 366. (May be taken concurrently with 367.)
A lecture-performance course in the principles of play direction, including studies in such areas as script analysis, the production concept, dramatic picturization, movement, business, tempo, emphasis, variety, and unity of effect.

376. Advanced Play Direction.
Prerequisite: 375.
A lecture-performance course in the principles of play direction, including studies in such areas as the staging of expository scenes, creating of mood, developing suspense, achieving surprise and marking climaxes.

395. Seminar in Theatre.
Subject and requirements to be determined by needs and interests of students.

396. Seminar in Theatre.

397. Seminar in Theatre: Fieldwork in Chicago I.
Prerequisite: consent of chairperson.
Variable credit (1-6 hours) for projects undertaken in theatrical groups outside the university. Students keep a journal and write evaluative papers. Repeatable each semester for credit.

398. Seminar in Theatre: Fieldwork in Chicago II.
Prerequisite: consent of chair-person.
Variable credit (1-6 hours) for projects undertaken in theatrical groups outside the university. Students keep a journal and write evaluative papers. Repeatable each semester for credit.

399. Independent Study.
Prerequisite: written permission of chairperson.
Independent study projects may be of various kinds and in any recognized area of the theatre arts. Such projects should be done under the close supervision of a theatre faculty member.

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