2009 M/MLA Annual Convention

November 12-15, St. Louis, Missouri

Schedule & Abstracts

Saturday, November 14, 2009

8:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. Refreshments (Regency C Ballroom)

You are invited to attend the Book Exhibit, 8:00 a.m.-6:30 p.m. (Regency C Ballroom)

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Permanent Sections

63. American Literature I: Literature Before 1870

8:30-10:00 a.m. (Midnight Special)

Topic: Migration: Crossing/Transgressing Sociocultural Borders/Barriers in Early American Literature

Chair: Anne Herbert, Bradley University

1. An American Patriarch: Christopher Columbus and Transnationalism in Susanna Rowson's Reuben and Rachel by Lindsay DiCuirci, Ohio State University

 

Abstract

This paper analyzes Susanna Rowson’s under-studied novel, Reuben and Rachel (1798), in the context of the burgeoning interest in America’s colonial history in the late eighteenth century. Rowson’s transnational epic traces the history of the Americas’ colonization from 1492 to the mid-eighteenth century. The novel begins with a sympathetic portrait of Christopher Columbus, who becomes the patriarch of a large and often persecuted line of decedents. Columbus’s line consists of an array of races, creeds, and nationalities as his descendants migrate from the colonies to continental Europe, to England, and eventually to New England, where the line is traced to the family of William Penn. Rowson’s novel confronts a range of issues from the “dangers” of Catholicism to the possibilities of interracial marriage. The primary question that the novel confronts, though, is one that began to dominate American letters at the turn of the century: To what person or event can America trace its origins?

Choosing the figure of Columbus to answer this question undercut two key myths of America’s origins that were also propagated at the turn of the century: The myth of American exceptionalism and the myth of the New World as God’s Promised Land to the separatists. Ultimately, Rowson’s novel challenges what Sacvan Bercovitch notably called the “Puritan origins of the American self.” Rowson’s novel of Columbus articulates a transnational understanding of the foundation and development of the American character and calls for a closer identification with a European past instead of a break from it.

2. A Great Deliverance: E.W. Harper and James M. Whitfield and the Poetics of Migration by Heather Buchanan, The College for Creative Studies

 

Abstract

For African American poets, negotiation of the sociocultural borders and barriers in American society during the slavery and post-slavery eras often rested within the meanings contained in socially conscious poetry. As a complement to abolitionist rhetoric, poetry brought to light the plight of both slaves and free people of African descent. Poets E.W. Harper and James M. Whitfield, in particular, masterfully incorporated "salvation poetics" within their works to project an artistic and political vision of a great Deliverer as a means of transcendence. The New World biblical Egypt trope appears in both poets' works, signaling a rallying cry for oppressed African Americans. Frances E. W. Harper (1825-1911) lived a contradictory early life: she was born to free parents, but lived in Maryland, an antebellum slave state. A noted social activist, Harper was recognized by Frederick Douglass and is one of the most prolific African American creative writers of the 19th Century. After some years away as a teacher in Ohio and Pennsylvania, Harper herself became a refugee (because of her violation of a Maryland law regarding free blacks), spurring her towards the antislavery movement. She also accompanied runaway slaves along the Underground Railroad. From 1866-1871, she traveled the South as a speaker. Her Moses: A Story of the Nile (1869) is an epic poem on the slave experience. James A. Whitfield, like Harper, was born free in New Hampshire but was known as a frustrated literary genius relegated to work as a barber. Despite being forced to labor in obscurity, Whitfield's antislavery poetry was widely celebrated. Whitfield also helped organize the 1854 National Emigration Convention. His socially conscious "America" (1853) is an artistic exploration of the hypocrisies of the American ideological landscape. His "The North Star" parallels motifs in Harper's Moses. Analysis of Harper's and Whitfield's poems as a reflection of their sociopolitical experiences reveal how their poetry posits a "journey" to freedom.

3. Transnational America in Timothy Flint's Francis Berrian, or the Mexican Patriot by Binod Paudyal, Utah State University

 

Abstract

In this paper, I argue that, by representing characters that engage in transcultural conversations and transcend the borders between Mexico and the United States, Timothy Flint's Francis Berrian, or the Mexican Patriot (1826) represents 19th century America in more transnational terms. I examine the characters of Martha and Francis and explore how they, through their activities and social, religious and political relations, create "social fields" (Basch, et al, Nations Unbound 22) where negotiation and transformation take place "without an assumed or imposed hierarchy" (Bhabha, The Location of Culture 4). Through these social fields, which are similar to Homi Bhabha's concept of "third space," the novel opens up the possibility for new interpretations of identity as contingent, hybrid and transnational (37). Francis who is from Boston marries Martha, a beautiful woman from Mexico. Both Martha and Francis maintain multiple relationships across familial, cultural, and political borders, and their marriage is a "happy union of Spanish and Yankee" (264). Their decision to educate their sons as Protestants and daughters as Catholics suggests their interrelationship and mutual understanding. Ultimately Francis and Martha represent a process of Mexican-American cultural formation that includes, as Lisa Lowe states, "practices that are partly inherited, partly modified, as well as partly invented" (Immigrant Acts 167). Their actions and thoughts develop subjectivities and identities embedded in transcultural relationships that connect them simultaneously to two nations--the US and Mexico.

4. The Tourist and the Terrorist: Melville's Encounter with Western Exceptionalism by Joe Conway, Washington University

 

Abstract

In The Confidence Man, Herman Melville offers his readers two versions of western personhood that resist nationalist commitment. The Cosmopolitan, a kind of cultural tourist, "federates, in heart as in costume, something of the various gallantries of men under various suns." Conversely, the Indian-hater refuses government office because he wishes to pursue his unofficial war against native peoples. Described as one whose epitaph is terror, the Indian-hater escapes the boundaries of official representation; paradoxically, however, his reign of violence establishes the very conditions for official U.S. power to assert itself. As I argue, in the encounter between the Cosmopolitan and the Indian-hater, Melville stages an unresolved dialectic at the center of exceptionalist theories regarding western-style democracy. Michael Hardt and Antonio Negri have called attention to the Janus-faced nature of such exceptionalism. On one hand, western democracy is exceptional above all other forms of government, because, like the Cosmopolitan, it promises to bring the world into a transnational order of peace and unity. On the other hand, western-democratic regimes like the U.S. regularly cast themselves, like the Indian-hater, as exceptions to the rule of law. Thus through their joint encounter, Melville probes the depths of democracy's heart of darkness, wherein the West is tragically unable to transcend the racist and violent energies with which it shares an obscure but fundamental intimacy.

64. Applied Linguistics

8:30-10:00 a.m. (Knickerbocker)

Topic: Second Language Acquisition in a Multicultural Context

Chair: Kashma Mulamba, Olivet Nazarene University

1. Institutional Migrations: Policies, Philosophies, and Politics by Christopher Schroeder, Northeastern Illinois University

 

Abstract

Many U.S. immigrants struggle to acquire English proficiencies, and Generation 1.5 sometimes sounds more comfortable than their writing suggests. In schools and throughout society, these efforts are seen as signs of educational obstacles to overcome regardless of these learners' experiences with or attitudes about languages and literacies. In this and other ways, schools and other social institutions reinforce a standard English ideology that is misinformed and incomplete. The purpose of this presentation is to reconsider the efforts of ethnolinguistic minorities to acquire English proficiencies within the United States. In particular, it reports results from an institutional case study of Northeastern Illinois University, the most (ethnically) diverse university in the Midwest and an official Hispanic Serving Institution, as experienced by Latino students. After situating these students within national and institutional contexts, it turns to particular performances--assignments in a Proyecto Pa'Lante seminar course, as well as the responses from the teacher and other faculty. Next it generalizes from these responses and other data to language policies and literacy philosophies, as well as the relation of these to the educational and social obligations of the institution. Finally, it offers an alternative perspective on these performances, informed by emerging research in multilingualism and multiliteracies, that reframes these purported educational obstacles as intellectual opportunities for both individuals and institutions.

2. Natural Second Language Learning: Acquisition of Guarani by Peace Corps Volunteers in Paraguay by Karla Del Rio and Susan Garzon, Oklahoma State University

 

Abstract

In recent years, research on second language acquisition among adults has expanded from the traditional focus on classroom settings to more natural contexts, including studies on immigrants and students in study abroad programs. This study extends the research on natural SLA by focusing on a different group: Peace Corps volunteers in Paraguay. It examines their acquisition of Guarani, an indigenous language that allows considerable code-switching with Spanish. The subjects are four volunteers: two in urban areas and two in rural areas. Data was collected through interviews, e-mail questionnaires, and language logs. The initial analysis followed Norton's approach of examining access to conversations. Findings indicate three main factors involved in the degree to which volunteers acquired Guarani: need for the language, opportunity to hear and use it, and beliefs concerning the use of Guarani by community members and volunteers.


65. Canadian Literature

8:30-10:00 a.m. (Burlington Route)

Topic: Branding and Defining the Canadian Experience

Chair: Shannon Howard, University of South Alabama

1. The Search for Meaningful Apocalypse in Eaton's The Inactivist and Are We Not Horses by Shannon Howard, University of South Alabama

 

Abstract

Canadian author and songwriter Chris Eaton focuses on the paradigm of a North American city whose urban setting and Tagline Bar represent the end of all original artistic enterprise in his debut novel The Inactivist. In addition, his band's CD Are We Not Horses iterates the search for meaningful battle between creatures that discover their identity is false in the face of apocalyptic struggle.

The American myth of a divine "city on a hill," explained by John Winthrop, has been replaced by a city characterized by spiritual and physical apocalypse at the advent of the millennium, but such an apocalypse must be simulated and, therefore, does not provide an antidote to the urban angst surrounding the advent of a new age. The wish to return to an earlier age where creatures and men defined their actions in terms of nobility rather than financial profit is a theme reflective of both Eaton's work and, perhaps, of Canadian artists facing a millennium where their identity remains in constant flux.

This project details the search for meaningful apocalypse in a city whose location is virtually unknowable except through references to contemporary North American marketing strategy. Canadian identity, although not overtly addressed, becomes a subject of the text's negotiation of capitalism and its allusions to scatological processes--processes that create a wasteland of inactivists who are incapable of nobility.

2. Canadian "Literary Hegemony" and the Marketing of an Indie Poet: David Solway and his Forgeries by Maryanne Laurico, Queen's University, Kingston, Canada

 

Abstract

Despite expressing distaste for "inauthentic" writing, David Solway--Canadian critic, poet, forger of identities, and pariah of many academic circles--forged a collection of poetry, Saracen Island: The Poetry of Andreas Karavis (2000), faked the existence of its author, and not only claimed to be its translator (from Greek to English), but wrote the critical companion to it, An Andreas Karavis Companion (2000). In October 2000, Andreas Karavis--initially deemed "Greece's Modern Homer"--turned out to be none other than David Solway himself. Are Solway's forgeries a cry for attention or desperate anti-establishment marketing scheme? Are they a way for him to gain readership as an "indie" poet? How do his forgeries change the way we understand literary celebrity in Canada?

In my paper, I argue that Solway's forged poetry and criticism underscore the paradoxical belief in and desperate quest for an original, authentic identity. In addition to advocating for a freedom of expressive poetic identity and calling for the exposure of "literary hegemony," Solway's forgeries attempt to illuminate the idea that authenticity lies in multiplicity, paradox, and the dissension and disparity at the heart of a coherent singular originality. Solway attempts to collapse the false binary of authentic/inauthentic by creating an "authentic" self through an "inauthentic" literary forgery. My examination of "Andreas Karavis" underscores the fragility of the fluid and ephemeral definition of authenticity that contemporary commercial culture deems authoritative.

3. "L'Amérique est un tout": Dany Laferrière and his transnational challenge to American hegemony by Lee E.S. Bessette, Florida A&M University

 

Abstract

Dany Laferriere declared in his first novel, Comment fair l'amour avec un Negre sans se fatiguer that "L'Amerique est un tout." He is speaking more generally of North America, and his experiences as a Haitian political refugee in Montreal navigating this new world have been preserved and semi-fictionalized in his early journalistic writings, four of his "Cycle Autobiographique" novels and the movie he wrote.

Dany Laferriere has always sought to be a different type of writer. Laferriere himself stopped writing for a number of years because his attempts to be considered a writer had largely been misunderstood or ignored (see Je suis fatigue). In a book-length interview, Laferriere states "je ne veux plus de frontiere" (J'ecris comme je vis 88). His strategies to achieve this kind of transnationalism have largely been misunderstood as a celebration of Americanism. As I have written elsewhere, Laferriere first novel "...actually challenges Anglo-American hegemony through a multiplicity of transcultural references" (Skallerup 91). This comes, specifically, writing in French in Montreal.

His writings, novels and movies have moved between three main poles: Canada (specifically Montreal), the United States and Haiti. Blending fiction and autobiography has been Laferriere's main narrative strategy, although his recent movies and writings have been more fictional in nature. The focus of this paper will be to examine how he treats the issues of transnationalism and transculturalism in his "Amerique," through his multiple artistic outputs.

66. French II

8:30-10:00 a.m. (Frisco)

Topic: Francois Truffaut

Chair: Florian Vauléon, Stetson University

Secretary: Kevin Snorteland, Ohio State University

1. Truffaut's La nuit américaine and the idealized family of cinema by Adela Lechintan, Ohio State University

 

Abstract

Not Available

2. The Powers of the False: The Last Metro and the Time-Image by Kevin Snorteland, Ohio State University

 

Abstract

Not Available

3. Mise en scène ét erotisme dans Les 400 coups de Truffaut by Florian Vauléon, Stetson University

 

Abstract

Not Available

67. Old and Middle English Literature and Language

8:30-10:00 a.m (Wabash Cannonball)

Topic: Language Matters in Old and Middle English Texts

Chair: Damian Fleming, Indiana University-Purdue University Fort Wayne

Secretary: Erik Carlson, University of Minnesota

1. A Deeper Dialect: LALME, Morphophonology, and Word Formation in the Pearl-Poet by Jonathan Dunn, Purdue University

 

Abstract

The Linguistic Atlas of Late Medieval English attempts to create a map of Middle English dialects by identifying certain important phonological features and showing the distribution of these features across a map of England. While this is a good start to understanding late medieval dialects, it does not go far enough. This period witnessed a great change not only in English phonology but also in English morphology and syntax. The methodology behind LALME, however, considers only phonology. Yet the phonological changes and variety of Middle English had an immediate impact on morphology and we should be able to see this impact in the productive processes of word formation in the various dialects. In other words, the surface changes of phonology in a dialect influence the interface between the sound and syntax of that dialect. Certain inflections and certain derivational affixes will be favored and others discarded as a result of changes in phonology. LALME thoroughly reports the features of words shared by the dialects. But it does not consider the effect of these features on the creation of new words. The isolation and mystery of the Pearl-poet makes the Cotton Nero A.x manuscript a perfect testing ground for a deeper analysis of Middle English dialect. This paper will examine the morphophonology of Cotton Nero A.x, specifically its hapaxes and nonce words, in order show how changes in the surface dialect brought about other unexpected variances in the language.

2. The Language of Architecture in Early Middle English Verse by Lori Garner, Rhodes College

 

Abstract

During and following the Norman Conquest, the culture of England was--both figuratively and quite literally--rebuilt, as its language, political structure, literary traditions, and architectural landscape all underwent profound changes so massive in scope as to mark period boundaries for most modern fields of discourse, with "Old English" and "Anglo-Saxon" language and culture giving way to "Middle English" and "Anglo-Norman." The architectural break with the past was especially swift and dramatic. As Eric Fernie observes, "the sheer volume of construction in the first generation after the Conquest must have turned the country into a vast building site, with almost every city, town and village affected" (Architecture of Norman England 19). The new Norman order was thus powerfully asserted through the castles, cathedrals, and other large structures that eventually figure as prominently in literature as on the landscape itself. However, while the period's actual architecture looked increasingly forward, architectural description in contemporary verse was more inclined to look back with a certain nostalgia for its Germanic past. In such poems as the Brut, King Horn, and Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, poetic descriptions of even the most obviously Norman-inspired structures often demonstrate a reliance upon Old English oral poetics and highly-charged idiomatic architectural language. This paper explores some of the various ways that the language used in architectural description serves to negotiate the uneasy relationship between old and new social orders in this dynamic period of cultural change.

3. The sawis of bothe two sides: Richard the Redeless and Instructing Kings in English by Lesley Allen, Greenville College

 

Abstract

Richard the Redeless begins in medias res, or rather, in media urbis, as the city of Bristol appears as a microcosm for the English language and nation. The poet, witnessing the aftermath of Richard II's reign, passes through Bristol and encounters "the sawis of bothe two sides" of an argument concerning the absent Richard's Irish crusade and Henry's return from exile to England (Prolog. 8-11). These references position the speaker in a tenuous period after Richard's initial fall from power and before Henry's accession to the throne. The purpose of the text is to "wissen" or instruct the new king as well as "every Cristen kyng that ony croune bereth / So he were lerned on the langage" of English (Prolog. 43-44). This language-conscious detail reminds the reader that this text is intended as princely instruction in English in England, contrasting it with contemporary prince's mirrors in Latin, especially Giles of Rome and the Secreta Secretorum. Asserting itself in the vernacular, this advisory text becomes the very voice of Bristol (and by extension, the nation) where the author first encounters the "sawes" of English political argument. My paper argues that Richard the Redeless, positioned between two reigns and two centuries, fuses together various vernacular literary features and traditions (borrowing from the genres of the prince's mirror, de casibus narrative, and martyrology) in order to revise models of English kingship for the fifteenth century.

68. Shakespeare and Shakespearean Criticism - Moved to Session 35, Friday, 12:30 p.m.

69. Spanish III: Latin American Literature

8:30-10:00 a.m. and Sunday, November 15th, 8:30-11:45 a.m. (Jeffersonian)

Topic: Identities and Intersections

Chair: Debbie Lee DiStefano, Southeast Missouri State University

Secretary: Kelly McDonough, University of Minnesota

Session A

8:30-10:00 a.m. (Jeffersonian)

1. Re-writing History in Gertrudis Gómez de Avellaneda's Guatimozín by Rogelia Lily Ibarra, Dominican University

 

Abstract

The "truthfulness" or "authenticity" of history versus the fictional invention of the traditional novel was a prevalent debate in nineteenth-century Europe and informed the rise of the historical novel genre. The discussion over the possible harmonizing of the "opposite" principles of history and fiction in this new genre were present in nineteenth-century Latin America as well, particularly among intellectuals and writers such as Domingo del Monte, Jose Maria Heredia, and Andres Bello. In 1846, the Cuban writer, Gertrudis Gomez de Avellaneda, implemented the genre of the historical novel with her book Guatimozin. Ultimo Emperador de Mexico, to recreate the account of the Conquest of Mexico by the Spanish conquistador Hernan Cortes and his fleet. Avellaneda uses the historical narrative of Hernan Cortes and Moctezuma II's encounter as a way to re-write history and broaden the parameters of the traditional role of historian. This paper will demonstrate how the author contests hegemonic discourses of civilization and barbarism, legitimizes the indigenous other, and creates a critical subtext on contemporary issues of her time--gender, race, and colonial relationships of power between Spain and the newly forming Latin American nations--by looking to the past. This transatlantic framework is based on the novel's subject matter, the site of its publication, and the author's location at the time, Madrid, Spain. On a larger scale, I will show how Avellaneda's use of counterhistorical narrative discourses, which she creates by dialoguing with major chronicalists and historians of the Conquest of Mexico, challenges the concept of history as master text and implies the dialogical relationship between "history" and "literature."

2. Un ajiaco de contradicciones: Paradoxes in the Representation of Havana in Cerrado por reparación and El año que viene estamos en Cuba by Jenna Leving, The University of Chicago

 

Abstract

Critical questions of borders, migratory spaces, and textual and geographic margins inevitably raise a number of subsequent questions of national identity and citizenship. Notions of Cuban identity are at stake in this paper as I look at literature produced both on and off the island: Cerrado por reparacion written in Cuba, and El Ano que viene estamos en Cuba, written in the US. The condition of the city is irrevocable from these stories; both texts evoke an image of Havana through their narrative tours of the city. It might seem that the opposing perspectives in terms of geography, and even politics and history, would produce opposing textual images of Havana. Rather than standing in opposition to one another, however, the two visions of Havana in the narratives of Nancy Alonso and Gustavo Perez Firmat effectively construct a complete literary image of Havana, producing a single, shared narrative space. What's more, I argue, this space is essentially Cuban.

What is it that unifies this city across 90 miles? Through a close reading of the short stories in Alonso's text and the episodes in Perez Firmat, I will explore the ways in which, despite the contradictory visions of Havana produced by these two texts, they are joined together in that they both participate in a paradoxical representation of the Cuban capital. Each illustrates contradictory visions of Havana, simultaneous affection and disappointment for life in the city, support and disillusionment toward the Revolution. It is not only a common national identity, nor a shared nostalgic memory, but these texts repeatedly present Havana as this paradox imbedded in a duplicitous attitude toward the city and their relationship to it. The ultimate irony, I propose, is that these "opposite" visions are unified by their ironies; the contradictions, ironically, are what makes these supposedly opposing perspectives into a single, literary vision of the city of Havana.

3. Sinfonía de Voces Mariginales en Quíntuples de Luís Rafael Sánchez: una deconstrucción del discurso patriarcal by Alannah Ari Hernandez, Concordia University-Chicago

 

Abstract

Not Available

4. Violations of the public and private in Perfume de Violetas (nadie te oye) by María Luisa Ruiz, Saint Mary's College of California

 

Abstract

The themes of gender, violence and power, and the intersection of public and private spaces are at the center of Marisa Sistach's 2001 film Perfume de Violetas (nadie te oye). Often, limits to women's participation in public spaces are coded in language of protection and control. For example, Federico Gamboa's novel Santa (1903), Gustavo Sainz's La princesa del Palacio de Hierro (1974) and more recently, Javier Valdez' Asesino en serio (2002) narrate explicitly the threat of violence on those women who, by choice or circumstance, violate rules of public space. All three novels use Mexico City as their 'stage' and suggest that women who violate public space are 'dangerous'.

While in the three examples above women's experiences are reduced to their corporeal presence, Marisa Sistach uses tensions of public and private to highlight violations of that space. In my presentation, based on an article I am currently working on, I interrogate how Marisa Sistach's 2001 film Perfume de Violetas (nadie te oye) uses female characters to negotiate national identity at a time when many assert that, in hyper-urbanized Mexico City, 'identity', and 'space' as a unified, stable entities linked to the nation-state have been replaced by hybrid and post-modern definitions. Sistach's film suggests that definitions of 'identity' and 'space' in Mexico City's hyper-urbanized context are as fragmented as the cityscape and indeed, have negative and violent consequences on women in both public and private spheres.

Session B

Sunday, November 15th, 8:30-10:00 a.m. (Jeffersonian)

5. Los lumpen en la poesía de Carlos Martínez Rivas by Erick Blandón, University of Missouri-Columbia

 

Abstract

Not Available

6. Decolonizing Tepan: Affirmative Resistance and Alternative Nationhood in Elena Garro's La dama boba by David Lisenby, The University of Kansas

 

Abstract

Elena Garro's 1963 play La dama boba meta-dramatically stages an encounter episode in rural Mexico between indigenous peasants and a group of mestizo actors from the capital. Appropriating Lope de Vega's La dama boba (1613), Garro's play ironically critiques the dominant discourse of Mexican nationhood in the mid-twentieth century that sought ambivalently to establish an official national identity through idealization of pre-Hispanic cultural roots while simultaneously subordinating indigenous cultures to cosmopolitan values. The transcultural exchange between the play's two protagonists--Lupe, an indigenous woman, and Francisco, a capitalino--offers the beginnings of a model for creating an egalitarian Mexican society. This model, however, ultimately fails in the play, exposing the persistent divisions in Mexico along overlapping lines of ethnicity, race, culture, geography, education, and gender. This study draws on concepts of surrogation, mimicry, and racialization in analyzing the convergence in La dama boba of feminist and indigenist preoccupations present throughout Garro's literary work. La dama boba empowers the doubly-subjugated Amerindian woman, interpellating her into a position of new (post)colonial subjectivity, while parodying the post-Revolution tradition of theatre tours and literacy campaigns that have sought to indoctrinate Mexico's "ignorant" rural population into the socio-cultural norms of Mexico City's hegemonic elite.

7. Noble pobre, pechero rico: Don Alonso Enríquez de Guzmán y la construcción de nuevas identidades en el Perú colonial by Iván R. Reyna, University of Missouri

 

Abstract

Not Available

Session C

Sunday, November 15th, 10:15-11:45 a.m. (Jeffersonian)

8. The Construction and Deconstruction of racial Identity in Silvia Iparraguirre's novel La Tierra del Fuego by Gabriele Eckart, Southeast Missouri State University

 

Abstract

The fact that on Darwin's voyage aboard the sailing ship Beagle, a Patagonian Indian was brought back, is well documented. Known as Jemmy Button, he learned English and English manners, visited Queen Victoria and returned two years later to Patagonia to continue his former life as an Indian. Sylvia Iparraguirre investigated the story of this Indian and presented the results in her novel La Tierra del Fuego (1998). My paper proposes to investigate the construction of Button's racial identity in the mind of the sailboat's English captain and its deconstruction in the mind of the Argentinean ship boy who was present when Button was kidnapped and, later, became his friend. I will work with Kwame Anthony Appiah's theory on race.

9. White on All Four Sides: Race Discourse in the Novels of Teresa de la Parra by Rose Anna Mueller, Columbia College College

 

Abstract

Teresa de la Parra's two novels reflect the social, political, economical and racial realities of Venezuela in the 1920s. Iphigenia: the diary of a young girl who wrote because she was bored (1924) and Mama Blanca's Memoirs (1929), explore issues of race and race/class relations in a Creole Caracas household in the case of Iphigenia, and on a sugarcane plantation in the case of Mama Blanca's Memoirs. The urban and rural settings allow for interactions between the races and a range of racial/racist discourse that reflects attitudes towards racial mixing as Venezuela was transitioning from an agrarian society to an economy based on petroleum. Social hierarchy was based on skin color.

The haciendas depended on black slave labor, and this had an impact on the racial makeup of the country. Slavery in Venezuela was outlawed in 1854. There are many references in de la Parra's works that attest to variations in skin color and its influences on social hierarchy. The heroine of Iphigenia, Maria Eugenia, is vain about being blonde. Her family wants her to marry a rich man, and her good family name and skin color are marketable commodities. She boasts that her best friend Mercedes Galindo is "white on all four sides." Her uncle, however, disputes Mercedes' lineage, insinuating that while husbands were away fighting the Wars of Independence, miscegenation took place. Mercedes asks him to speak in French so the black servants won't overhear the racist conversation and be offended by it.

There is a reference to "la aya mulata," or mixed-race nursemaid in the prize-winning short story Mama X which became a part of Iphigenia. The reference to this woman is just one example of the racial makeup of the Venezuelan population. Mulattos were also called pardos in the 18th century, and pardo came to describe all people of mixed race during Independence. The word "trigueno" was later used to describe black or dark-skinned in Venezuelans. The racial theme is picked up once more when a naive Maria Eugenia visits the port of Caracas and notices the racial mixtures of the dockworkers, and is forced to reflect on the difficult lives led by people of color on the waterfront and in the slums.

De la Parra was sensitive to the roles loyal female black servants played in Creole society. In Iphigenia Gregoria and the heroine bond, and Gregoria becomes Maria Eugenia's confidant, telling her family secrets, getting her books from the circulating library, and offering the only positive female role model for a young girl who needed one. In Mama Blanca's Memoirs, the narrator speculates that the nanny from Trinidad's cruel treatment of the lovable mixed-race Vicente Cochocho is merely a function of her self-hatred for her own "black half." After living in Paris and being exposed to its intellectual life, the author reflected on her own racial prejudices and removed the word "Jew" used as an anti-Semetic slur from the 1928 edition of Iphigenia. De la Parra formed a close friendship with the Cuban painter/anthropologist Lydia Cabrera, and inspired her to write Contes Negres de Cuba (1936), urging her friend to collect and publish the folk stories of Cuban blacks.

10. The Search for Self in the Poetry of Doris Moromisato by Debbie Lee-DiStefano, Southeast Missouri State University

 

Abstract

Doris Moromisato is a contemporary poet/activist in Lima, Peru. Her involvement in both the Okinawan community as well as women's rights issues has earned her a place among the literary intelligentsia. This paper will attempt to delineate how Doris discursively interrogates her sense of being in her two collections Chambala era un camino and Diario de la mujer: esponja. In each collection respectively, Doris delves into both her ethnic origins and gender orientation. The cathartic act of writing provided her the outlet through which she could come to terms with her/Self and rise above the Peruvian stereotypes. She is currently very active and her poetry is worth the recognition as a corpus that examines both ethnic and gender issues.

Special Sessions

70. Civil War: American Vortex in Print

8:30-5:30 p.m. (New York Central)

Chair: Kathleen Diffley, University of Iowa

Secretary and Moderator: Jane E. Schultz, Indiana University-Purdue, University of Indianapolis

Session A: Antebellum Developments

8:30-10:00 a.m. (New York Central)

1. Probing the South's Complex Roots: The Duality of Landscape and Architecture in John Pendleton Kennedy's Swallow Barn by Nicole Gainyard, University of Iowa

 

Abstract

This paper argues that the plantation myth provides a small-scale foundation upon which nineteenth century writers constructed their sense of the state of the nation, including the debate over slavery and the status of citizenship for African-Americans. I examine the multiplicity of cultural landscapes in Kennedy's Swallow Barn (1832, revised 1851), a novel often seen as establishing the plantation tradition. In the antebellum South, there was more than one way of ordering, seeing, and traveling on the land. Thanks to a critical intervention in the conceptualization of space, I do not begin with the dominant perspective; instead, this paper acknowledges the role of poor whites and slaves in the production of space and place making. Specifically, I give the plantation tradition an architectonic profile and a physical dimension by examining the ideological underpinnings of the big house, which are countered by the resistant codes of wayfaring blacks, common white farmers, and their enterprising geographies. Focusing on a variety of plantation spaces--cabins, kitchens, sheds, and stables--as well as the routes between them reveals the ways in which the tradition could be appropriated to reveal strikingly different social relations and racial priorities.

2. The Pen with Which I Am Writing: Frederick Douglass's Anticipatory References to Self in His 1845 Narrative by Jeremy Nyhuis, Indiana University-Purdue, University of Indianapolis

 

Abstract

Throughout his Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass (1845), the then-rising African American abolitionist makes a number of references that anticipate his present status as a writer and, more generally, a free individual. In light of Gerard Genette's 20th-century theories on narratology, these anticipatory references in Douglass's autobiography function as prolepses, evoking a future event in Douglass's narrative (namely, his eventual liberation) at a point before this event has occurred. In my paper I explore how these narratological acts of prolepsis reflect Douglass's utilization of literacy in his autobiography as an anticipatory, self-fulfilling prophecy of his escape from slavery. However, Douglass's use of prolepsis also suggests the anticipatory goals of the abolitionist cause, specifically the movement led by William Lloyd Garrison, which poses certain discursive limits on what Douglass can and cannot say in his first autobiography. In spite of these restrictions, I argue that Douglass manages to retain his autonomy in the fact that his anticipatory references to self function as "prolepses" toward his role as an independent writer--a writer who will later rebel against the Garrisonians in publishing his own newspaper, The North Star, and will eventually "rewrite" his autobiography twice in the form of My Bondage and My Freedom (1855) and Life and Times of Frederick Douglass (1882). Douglass's entire life, in this sense, can be viewed as a narrative driven by prolepsis, perpetually moving forward along an infinite plain through acts of anticipation.

3. Pastoral and Politics by Timothy Sweet, West Virginia University

 

Abstract

The figure of "mystic chords of memory" that concludes Abraham Lincoln's First Inaugural Address (1861), a figure suggested by William H. Seward, resonated through Lincoln's wartime rhetoric and consolidated two representational problems that would become central to the literature of the Civil War: the production of national identity from individual deaths in battle and the production of a nation from a topography of locales, regions, and sections. As the war stretched these chords to the breaking point, Lincoln simplified and clarified his figures, often separating spatial and temporal dimensions. Nevertheless, the pull of terrain abided throughout. Early in the war, Lincoln preferred the spatial formulation of the problem--for example, in the topographically based Second Annual Message to Congress (1862), which appealed to the supposed naturalness of nationhood in an image of the "national homestead" that evoked the long history of American pastoral imagery. In the Gettysburg Address (1863), temporal and spatial formulations again coincided, brought on by the problem of commemorating a battlefield. When outcome of the war was all but decided, Lincoln adverted to the temporal formulation, proposing a calculus of "blood" in the Second Inaugural Address (1864). Even so, underlying this calculus was a topographical base that localized the source of violence in the plantation South. In all these figures, temporal and spatial dimensions are complexly intertwined because of the problematic representative function of the dead: to signify both differentiation as geographically-designated enemies and unification as countrymen. Whitman's Drum-Taps (1865) and Melville's Battle-Pieces (1866) addressed the respective halves of this problem, unification and differentiation, through their approaches to setting.

Session B: Charting the War

10:15-11:45 (New York Central)

4. Melville's Two Wars: Israel Potter and Battle-Pieces by Benjamin Cooper, Washington University in St. Louis

 

Abstract

What difference do soldiers make in the stories we tell ourselves about our national literature? To begin to answer this question, my talk aims to make sense of Battle-Pieces (1866) as the last stage in a long meditation by Melville over the affective potential of the soldier's voice. The soldier in Pierre (1852) is a suspension in time--a static memory of virtue and duty. Pierre's father, a Revolutionary War hero, survives in the novel as a portrait hung on the wall, his likeness that of "a pure, cheerful, childlike, blue-eyed divine old man." The muteness of this military image caused its author no small bit of reverence, endowed as it was with the "heavenly persuasiveness of angelic speech." For much of Melville's career, American soldiers like Pierre's father spoke to him, and so he found occasion to speak for them. Even then, Battle-Pieces is no celebration of the soldier and his "angelic speech," but rather an attenuation of the soldier's language in the hopes of nationalistic cures. Like many in the 19th and 20th centuries, Melville did not trust the soldier to speak for himself. Between Pierre and Battle-Pieces, Melville worked into fiction the previously published memoir of the Revolutionary soldier Israel Potter. The original 1828 text by Potter is marked by the aging soldier's reluctance in seeking sympathy and commiseration (he was more interested in a federal pension than in readers identifying with him). In contrast, Melville's Israel Potter (1856) attempts to mythologize the Revolutionary soldier in much the same way that Battle-Pieces would later portray the Civil War soldier, as a mode of man caught somewhere between misunderstood spy and abandoned refugee. Such ventriloquism I consider to be more representative of 19th century civilian guilt than actual military experience.

5. William Gould's Diary and the Poetics of Reticence by Christopher Hager, Trinity College

 

Abstract

As the ranks of Civil War-era texts swell with new discoveries, readers confront new interpretive problems, particularly when those texts appear to be, in their ordinariness or their dearth of writerly flair, rather disappointing. The diary of William B. Gould (Diary of a Contraband, Stanford UP, 2002), one of a few recently published African American texts that emerged literally out of someone's attic, is a remarkable historical artifact--the firsthand account of an escaped slave's service in the U.S. Navy from 1862 to 1865, never edited or published in the author's lifetime. In literary terms, though, Gould's journal at first seems fruitless reading. It is laconic, detached, apparently unrevealing of Gould's own thoughts and feelings. The entry for January 30, 1864, reads in its entirety: "Raining all day. Went ashore in afternoon." Whole pages of the diary record almost nothing but the weather. This paper will suggest ways of reading the interiority that Gould's diary in its reticence seems to withhold. By studying this marginally literate writer's improvisation of the craft of diary-keeping, we glimpse a profoundly important aspect of emancipation--a former slave's adjustment to the equivocal freedom of service on a naval vessel--and gain fresh understanding of how the realities of life at war called forth new forms of written expression.

6. Ordinarily Great: Whitman's War News as National Memory by Samuel Graber, Valparaiso University

 

Abstract

Walt Whitman, a former journalist and editor, had a particularly intimate connection to Civil War news. Whitman actively engaged in shaping the earliest public understandings of the war as the author of timely war poetry and as an occasional correspondent to major newspapers. Yet Whitman took up war news, as well as the war itself, as a subject for poetic reflection in his war collections Drum-Taps and Sequel to Drum-Taps. This paper explores Whitman's attempt to appropriate the rhythms and political effects of war news as an alternative form of national memory. First, it reconsiders Whitman's nearly plagiaristic use of war news as a source for his war poems in terms of the unusual dynamics of Civil-War-era news readerships. Second, it interprets several key passages of war poetry as Whitman's way of highlighting the profound communal consequences of the emerging information network. Finally, it argues that Whitman's enthusiasm for war news is best understood as an extension of his longstanding concerns about America's relationship to British traditionalism. The first editions of Leaves of Grass were preoccupied with the establishment of an independent American literature and expressed Whitman's understanding that such a literature would require increasing Americans' commitment to their unique national history and memory. This paper ultimately argues that Whitman perceived war news as an avenue for furthering that earlier project by developing a radically modern form of memory, one that could differentiate American national identity from the traditions of the Old World.

Session C: Reconstruction & Imperial Desire

Moderator: Geraldine Murphy, City College, CUNY

2:15-3:45 p.m. (New York Central)

7. Depot Culture: Cornelius Vanderbilt and Magazining Memory by Kathleen Diffley, University of Iowa

 

Abstract

In October 1871, Cornelius Vanderbilt opened a new and commanding railroad station to consolidate his far-flung enterprises and reorient New York traffic for several city blocks, specifically between 42nd and 45th Streets. Built out of red pressed brick with cast iron trim in the exuberantly excessive style of France's Second Empire, the depot's terminal suggests by analogy how the Civil War's commemorative practices in print were at once nationally attuned and regionally developed. Much like New York's monumental depot, which was linked to a growing rail network and yet as locally accessible as the carts and pedestrians in Harper's Weekly's commemorative engraving, the circulation of Civil War stories during the 1860s and 1870s helped engineer a master narrative of liberty and justice while allowing for local challenges that only began in the South. During the years that followed Confederate defeat, the imperial hunger of the triumphant North was actually rebutted and complicated by regional disquiet, especially when newly founded magazines in outlying centers like Baltimore, Charlotte, Chicago, and San Francisco encouraged a more parallactic view of postwar American memory. At once national and local, network and node, Vanderbilt's Grand Central Depot suggests in its unexpected architectonics how the war took narrative shape in contemporary magazines, thanks to the depots across the country where periodicals arrived, depots that were suddenly both closer to and farther from 42nd Street.

8. (Dis)Figuring Valley Beautiful: Sidney Lanier's Tiger-Lillies and the Treacherous Southern Landscape by Martin T. Buinicki, Valparaiso University

 

Abstract

Sidney Lanier's novel begins in the idyllic Tennessee mountains in the days before the Civil War and ends abruptly in the war-torn streets of Richmond after its fall. His descriptions of what takes place in between demonstrate how Lanier's romantic views of the landscape are transformed by the war as the South becomes a battlefield. An almost transcendental view of nature in Book One gives way in Book Two to a naturalism at times rivaling that of Stephen Crane. While Book Two has received the most critical attention, presenting as it does a fictionalized account of Lanier's own experiences in the Confederate army, the novel as a whole offers a compelling portrayal of how Southern views of the land were affected by a war in which nearly all of the battles were fought in Southern territory. As the Confederate capital falls in Book Three, Lanier turns once again to the language of romance but, as readers noticed even at the time of the text's publication in 1867, the gesture is strikingly truncated and unconvincing. Lanier provides a compelling picture of life in a Union prison, but he is unable to provide a sustained depiction of Richmond in ruins. Valley Beautiful, the cultured mountain retreat of the novel's protagonists, the Sterling family, lies in ashes--Lanier's pessimistic testimony at the war's end of art's inability to redeem the treacherous Southern landscape.

9. Reconstruction on the Imperial Road: John Russell Young's Around the World with General Grant by Sharon Kennedy-Nolle, Iona College

 

Abstract

Following immediately on the close of Reconstruction and a troubled presidency, Ulysses Grant embarked on a worldwide tour from 1877 to 1879. Accompanying him was New York Herald journalist John Russell Young, whose dispatches home were later collected in a two-volume set entitled Around the World with General Grant (1879). With every port of call, the unsettled legacy of Civil War and Reconstruction were never far behind as Young's travel account was heavily interlaced with Grant's ruminations. This paper explores the troubled intersections where incipient imperialist fantasies and nostalgic reconstruction agendas converge in what Amy Kaplan has described as the interplay of "dissonance and resonance," which mutually define and destabilize one another. Further triangulating these "tensions of empire," in Cooper and Stoler's phrase, are sketches of colonial encounter which serve as ironic, often amusing, commentary.

Around the World with General Grant makes transparent an imperial network of fluctuating power relations riddled with instability, ambiguity and disorder. A private tourist and a premier global citizen, the General was always "U.S." Grant, iconic embodiment of the victorious American nation flexing expansionist muscle long before San Juan Hill. At the same time, his colonial encounters are seen as transformative. Grant's travel experiences thereby revise understandings of Reconstruction in startling ways as he argues for the merits of sustained southern occupation as well as delayed civil rights for African-Americans. His wartime reminiscences, always occurring in maritime transit, navigate Hardt and Negri's conceptions of Empire to reveal Reconstruction's promise to craft both national reassessment and global opportunity from postwar uncertainty.

Session D: Long Remember

4:00-5:30 p.m. (New York Central)

10. Grow Up Wid De Kentry: Reconstructing National Desire in Albion Tourgée's Bricks without Straw by Anna Stewart, University of Texas-Austin

 

Abstract

By the time Tourgee's Bricks Without Straw hit the press in 1880, the period of actual Reconstruction had passed, and the South had been "redeemed." Nevertheless, Tourgee uses his novel to explore the dissonance inherent in a community that both celebrates the symbolic union of Hesden Le Moyne and Mollie Ainslie, the archetypal North-South couple, while simultaneously undercutting the domestic stability of black families committed to democratic ideals. Throughout, Tourgee repeatedly offers his solution for this social dissonance-education--and even closes the novel with an engraving of a spelling book bearing the following optimistic inscription: "In Hoc Signo Vinces." Yet other texts mediate Bricks as well, serving as counterpoints and indicating the material conditions and cultural assumptions this spelling book "sign" must overcome: the Exodus tale in which Israel's people are commanded to make "bricks without straw"; the more recent "burnt-cork minstrels and exaggerations of caricaturists"; the "grotesque pictures in illustrated journals" that patronizingly scoff at superstitious blacks afraid of the KKK. Such textual referents plainly spell out the difficulties of ever Reconstructing a nation with formerly enslaved citizen-subjects, and the book's use of these competing texts evokes its own dissonance, even as it struggles to erect a more hopeful possibility. This paper offers a close reading of Tourgee's embedded texts and, in so doing, explores how the nation in Bricks Without Straw ultimately narrates itself out of such textual materials, inscribing and writing its subjects into a (Re)constructed existence.

11. The Old Southern under New Conditions: Henry W. Grady, Thomas Nelson Page, and New Southern Manhood by Jeremy Wells, Southern Illinois University - Carbondale

 

Abstract

When Henry W. Grady and Thomas Nelson Page began their public careers during the late 1870s, the South was still typically represented in northern mass media as an aberrant space in U.S. culture. By 1889, the year of Grady's death and two years after the publication of Page's In Ole Virginia, the South seemed in many accounts synonymous with "America" itself. This paper explores the roles played by Grady and Page in transforming the South from a outlying space to one symbolic of U.S. nationality, concentrating on how both writers sought to rewrite U.S. history in such a way that the plantation South came to displace colonial Massachusetts to become the true source of U.S entrepreneurial and expansionist history. Concentrating on the images of fathers that appear in the writings of both, the paper considers how Grady and Page managed to refound the nation by identifying the plantation as the source of the men who, in the words of Page, had "largely contributed to produce this nation." That both writers endorsed a vision of southern culture that was patriarchal is hardly surprising; that they helped to make a planter patriarchy seem the true Founding Fathers of the nation is less appreciated and is thus the focus of this paper.

12. “The Black and the Gray: Slave Memoirs of Confederate Service at Fort Sumter, by Sam Aleckson and Jacob Stroyer” by Susanna Ashton, Clemson University

 

Abstract

In Before the War, and After the Union: An Autobiography, ex-slave Sam Aleckson wrote, "I must admit I wore the 'gray.' I have never attended any of the Confederate reunions. I supposed they overlooked my name on the army roll." Despite his tone of wry analysis, Aleckson's memoir of Confederate service leaves little room for humor. Forced to labor for Confederate officers stationed on various islands during battles around Charleston, South Carolina, Aleckson witnessed deprivation, much suffering and the terrifying dilemmas of slaves forced to defend and die for a cause they did not have much investment in. Similarly, Jacob Stroyer's 1885 memoir, My Life in the South, circled uneasily around his teenage Confederate service; he asserted that the confederate service gave him great status back on the plantation, despite the unceasing prayers slaves always had for a Union victory. In my presentation I argue that these careful tones of uneasy nostalgia and traumatic recollection were necessarily framed by late nineteenth century and early twentieth century notions of not just the civil war and the history of slavery, but notions about how to deploy and shape memory itself.

71. Constructing the Local in 19th and 20th Century Spain

8:30-11:45 a.m. (Grand Hall Meeting Room II)

Chair: Eugenia Afinoguénova, Marquette University

Respondent: Toni Dorca, Macalester College

Session A

8:30-10:00 a.m. (Grand Hall Meeting Room II)

1. The Place of a Liminal Voice: The Periodical El Vapor (Barcelona, 1833-1838) by Paula A. Sprague, Dartmouth College

 

Abstract

Nineteenth century periodical productions in Spain were local by default with regard to their production, editing, and printing, but content can be a different question. So, when a periodical in Barcelona, during the 1830s, fills its pages with writing in support of the crown in Madrid, what does it imply about its commitment to the local community and its interests? The periodical in question, El Vapor (1833-1838), is also where the iconic ode, the first romantic poem in literary Catalan, "La patria" by Bonaventura Carles Aribau, was published. El Vapor included literary work, commentaries and reviews of literature and opera from Spain and other parts of Europe, as well as economic news from Barcelona. Within the dual nature of the periodical genre is where we can locate the expression of a local will, both in the persuasiveness of certain articles, as well as in the allegedly objective reporting or representing of others. This presentation examines the various discourses that characterize El Vapor as a way to read the editorial vision of the local that was promoted there. The necessary double-edge of this periodical is its response to the particular contemporary context in which it emerged. But the inherent duality has been removed from historic accounts in favor of subsequent hegemonies, such as the Renaixenca catalana. When approached from this perspective, El Vapor, a liminal, non-canonical cultural production, supplies us with an unmediated view of the identitary ideologies inscribed in it.

2. The Birth of the Region: Tourism and Territory in Turn-of-the-Century Spain by Eugenia Afinoguénova, Marquette University

 

Abstract

Recent anthropological studies demonstrate the importance of tourism for identifying consumable elements of local and regional lifestyles and religious practices for constructing local and regional 'cultures' which become key for communicating the notions of territorial affiliation to domestic populations. The proposed paper examines such domestic uses of early tourism in Spain, focusing on the period between the creation of Sociedad Espanola de Excursiones (founded in January 1893, following earlier Catalan example) and the activity of Patronato Nacional de Turismo (1928-36). As I intend to demonstrate, tourism practices and discourses played an important role in neutralizing the week territorial cohesion of Spain's nation-state through a paradigm of regional 'diversity' which could be integrated into a unified nation, rather than continue to challenge it.

Session B

10:15-11:45 a.m. (Grand Hall Meeting Room II)

3. The Iberian Miracle in the Film La señora de Fátima (Rafael Gil, 1951) by Julie M. Dahl, University of Wisconsin-Madison

 

Abstract

The problem of Spanish identity is most often proposed as the debate between nationalism and regionalism; however, at decisive moments in Spanish history, prominent voices have proposed an identity that supercedes Spanish nationalism. Iberianism is one of the most common of these identities and was a frequent part of the national debate at the end of the nineteenth century. The 1940s and 50s saw a new wave of Iberianism enter the cultural and political debate. This study will use the often-overlooked film La senora de Fatima (Rafael Gil, 1951) to examine the question of what lies inside and outside of "spanishness." This box-office success, coproduced between Spain and Portugal, was a product of the political pacts signed between the two countries in the aftermath of World War II when they found themselves ideologically and economically isolated from the rest of Europe. The story of the apparition of the Virgin Mary to three shepherd children in a remote region of Portugal in 1917 is retold with the predictable pro-catholic, anti-communist slant characteristic of the dictatorships of Franco and Salazar; however, in this version of the story, where half the actors are Spanish, half Portuguese, Iberia comes together united through the collective catharsis of shared religion and political beliefs. The common Spanish stereotypes of Portugal as remote and backwards are reinvented in this film to create a place where shared values can heal a centuries-old divided brotherhood and, perhaps more importantly, a place where these two societies, marginalized from the materialism of modernity, can experience miracles.

4. Spain's Identity Construction in the European Context: Juan José Millás's Tonto, muerto, bastardo e invisible by Olga Bezhanova, Cornell University

 

Abstract

Jesus, the main character of Juan Jose Millas's novel Tonto, muerto, bastardo e invisible (1995), has an opportunity to experiment with different ways of constructing an identity and experience the results of this creative process. Jesus lives in a society plagued by a profound identity crisis. The years when the novel was written coincide with the introduction of policies aimed at accelerating the process of Spain's entrance into the European Union. As a result, Spanish national identity had to undergo a reevaluation in order to fit its new role as a member of the Union. A growing number of immigrants from Third World countries also required a readjustment in terms of national identity. The novel explores Spain's difficulties of relating to the more affluent European countries as well as to the representatives of the Third World.

Critics often analyze Millas's novel through the use of identity-related cliches. The protagonist's eventual flight from Spain is seen as a result of his incapacity to discover 'authenticity' within his own country. In my view, the discussion of which of the identities that Jesus adopts is more 'authentic' is unproductive, since it is based on a profoundly essentialist approach to identity. Through constant displacement both within an outside of Spain, Millas's protagonist manages to catch a glimpse of a different order of reality behind the constraints of identity.

72. Diary to Autobiography: A Migration of Self-Authored Texts

8:30-10:00 a.m. (Grand Hall Meeting Room III)

Chair: Kami A. Hancock and Lynn M. Linder, Saint Louis University

1. Sensation Fiction's Claims to Authenticity: Wilkie Collins’ Uses of the Diary Form by Lynn M. Linder, Saint Louis University

 

Abstract

In the frequently quoted introduction to Wilkie Collins' most popular sensation novel, The Women in White, the narrator proposes a claim to authenticity based on the structure of the tale by "making the persons who have been most closely connected with them...relate their own experience, word for word." It is not surprising, then, that Collins utilizes the private diary form in this novel, as well as, Basil, No Name, and Armadale, in an attempt to represent characters' most intimate thoughts, reflections, and experiences. This paper will explore the uses and effects of the diary form in Wilkie Collins' fiction, tracing the characters' constructions of self and the novels' claims to authenticity. In addition, the paper focuses on the migrations and changes in form, content, and style of the diary depictions based on changing identity markers of race, class, and gender. Drawing from personal manuscript diaries, including those of London publishers, Richard and George Bentley, the paper will explore cultural connections and exchanges between personal diaries and fictional representations to elucidate the migrations in diary writing in mid-Victorian England.

2. Jacob's Room: Virginia Woolf and the Deviant Narrative by Kami A. Hancock, Saint Louis University

 

Abstract

In Virginia Woolf's novel, Jacob's Room she creates an elegy to her brother Thoby Stephen. The novel becomes a dynamic space in which Woolf explores not only gender differences, but pilots a new form of the novel. She mixes form, style, and convention to create a narrative that transgresses yet expands memory, and autobiography. Jacob's Room is a space the narrator will never inhabit; yet, is left with the duty to remember and preserve. Woolf uses Jacob's absence as a means to deviate from a patriarchal structure. The episodic snapshots are an example of not only displacing Jacob, but as a means to disrupt a linear, traditional passage of time. The deviant structure allows a multiplicity of perspectives, and for a subversion of authority. By permitting the reader the same external access to Jacob as the narrator, Woolf creates a sense of exclusion and loss. The narrative then is not a collection of his thoughts; rather, it becomes a collection of domestic impressions. From its opening with Mrs. Flanders writing, to the end where she holds his shoes, the text has been a reflection on Jacob, and by extension Thoby Stephen. While he may be the patriarchal, learned figure, his life is transcribed through a deviant narrative structure into the vernacular of the domestic.

3. The Forbidden Zone: Mary Borden and the Creation of the Feminine "Front" by Ann Torrusio, Saint Louis University

 

Abstract

This paper will examine Mary Borden's The Forbidden Zone (1929), a collection of sketches and short stories that depict her experience as an American WWI nurse on the Western Front. Unlike the male soldier's account of life at the front, Borden's text presents the horrors of the battlefield from the perspective of the nurse caregiver. This paper will trace the theme of migration through Borden's text by examining Borden's shifting sense of gender. Throughout Borden's text, she struggles to negotiate and reinscribe her gender. She postures herself as a sexless being, claiming, "It is impossible to be a woman here" but repostures to the traditional females roles of sister and mother. Borden also directly aligns herself as a masculine warrior figure, protecting the demasculinized bodies of the wounded: "This is the second battlefield. The battle now is going on over the helpless bodies of these men. It is we who are doing the fighting now, with their real enemies." The theme of migration is also evident in the way in which Borden presents and reacts to soldiers' suffering. The suffering of the wounded is the source of Borden's own suffering. Borden personifies Pain, thereby creating a common enemy who all must fight against as comrades in arms. Borden's portrayal of a migrating or shifting sense of gender, as well as her appropriation of soldiers' suffering, is an attempt to validate the nurse's role in wartime as a legitimate experience of war by recreating the nurse as a female soldier figure.

73. Gender and Time in 20th Century Texts

8:30-10:00 a.m. (Zephyr Rocket)

Chair: Heike Polster, University of Memphis

1. Hyphenated Identity and Reversed Memory in Julia Alvarez's How the Garcia Girls Lost Their Accents by Sara Burcon, Wayne State University

 

Abstract

Not Available

2. Feminist Aesthetic Strategies: The Temporal Play and Non-Linear Plots Found in Print and Visual Narratives by Melissa Ames, Eastern Illinois University

 

Abstract

Not Available

3. Hobo Time and Marilynne Robinson's Housekeeping by Elizabeth Klaver, Southern Illinois University

 

Abstract

Not Available

74. Migration and Exile in Israel/Palestine

8:30-10:00 a.m. (Illinois Central)

Chair: Michael Bernard-Donals, University of Wisconsin-Madison

1. Language and Deterritorialization in the Israel-Palestine Conflict by Michael Bernard-Donals, University of Wisconsin-Madison

 

Abstract

This paper makes two claims: the first is that the current conflict between Israel and Palestine is a reiteration of conflict (not a conflict, but conflict) that has been with us for well over two thousand years. The conflict--that we see it as a conflict--and our approaches to its solution are founded in a more than two-thousand year-old tradition of argument that relies upon the staking of positions, the idea of rationality and the public good. It's a tradition that doesn't seem to be especially helpful in this particular case. The second claim is that seeing Israel and Palestine in exilic terms is manifestly problematic: the trope of exile and return is a very old one (the 137th Psalm is a lament from the 6th century BCE), one that has been a powerfully cohesive force for the region's Jews and Arabs alike which has created imagined community in the absence of a territorial or national one; but these tropes often occlude the impossibility of physical return, and the danger that such a return would herald, particularly in the years since the Holocaust, as the tropes of exile and return have been wedded to the tropes of memory and forgetfulness and the impossibility of actual return is mitigated by the possibility of a nostalgic, figural one.

This paper pulls together these claims by making clear--through an the example of the deterioration and ultimate failure of a 'civic' discussion of the Israel-Palestine relationship in the city of Madison, Wisconsin, several years ago--why seeing the Israel-Palestine conflict in terms of argument (which relies on a notion of territoriality, the staking claims) is so problematic, and by laying out--following the work of Emmanuel Levinas and Jean-Luc Nancy--a notion of deterritorialization, which may well be more productive in the vexed case of Israel and Palestine because, at least in this case and perhaps in others, identity and the location of utterance themselves are called into question.

2. The Promise of Palestine: Memory, Migration, and the Holocaust by Richard Glejzer, North Central College

 

Abstract

"The Promise of Palestine: Memory, Migration, and the Holocaust," takes the work of Holocaust survivor Ruth Kluger, A Holocaust Girlhood Remembered, as its point of departure. For Kluger, migrating from Europe to places that do not bear the burden of memory offers no promise, no new beginning in a new world, only alienation and separation from those who share the horrors of her childhood. Focusing the work of Aharon Appelfeld in addition to Kluger's, this paper examines the underlying expectations of migration for Holocaust survivors as expressed in survivor narratives, specifically the promise of renewal and return that Palestine offers in contrast to the "newer" worlds of the Americas and Australia. Specifically it considers the relationship between migration and memory as a function of identities forged in new lands and languages, where the promise of such newness offers a position from which a survivor might speak.

3. The Poetics of Return and the Rhetoric of Listening: from Nechemya to Lea Goldberg by David Metzger, Old Dominion University

 

Abstract

Not Available

Permanent Sections

75. Art What Thou Eat: Food in Literature, Art, and Culture

Session B

10:15-11:45 a.m. (Grand Hall Meeting Room III)

(See Session # 5 - 8:30 a.m., Friday)

76. Bibliography and Textual Studies

10:15-11:45 a.m. (Frisco)

Topic: Material Practices of Reading, Writing, and Printing

Chair: Mark Alan Mattes, University of Iowa

1. The Wild'mild Footprints of the Editor in Shakespeare's Timon of Athens by Lacey Conley, Loyola University Chicago

 

Abstract

Timon of Athens has been the source of endless confusion and dissatisfaction for readers and critics of Shakespeare. Its initial publication in the First Folio was a seeming case of happenstance--it was inserted to fill a gap left by the (temporary) removal of Troilus and Cressida. This alone might lead readers to label Timon as "second-class" Shakespeare, a tendency that is amplified by the many textual problems and assumed incompleteness of the play. Its most recent editors, Arden 3's Dawson and Minton, comment on the "loose ends and insufficiently integrated episodes" and the "frequently uneven" verse, and also echo the common assumption that Timon features underdeveloped or oversimplified, even allegorical, characters who are unsettlingly "un-Shakespearean."

An act of editing is always also an act of interpretation; therefore, the editorial tradition that governs attitudes toward this play is necessarily implicated in its (at best) indifferent reception. By looking at the Folio text, stripped of all "emendations," one can uncover the possibilities for a complex characterization of Timon, who does not fit the extremist philanthropist/misanthrope binary in which editors and critics have almost unanimously placed him, but rather embodies a psychological complexity rivaling that of Shakespeare's most dynamic tragic figures. In this paper, I trace the editorial history of this play through a selection of "emendations" that have been widely accepted by editors since the eighteenth century, and have thus contributed to the interpretive limitations imposed on this work. Editorial tradition must always be questioned, and the possibility for new readings entertained if we are to do justice to the elaborate and unfixed meaning of Shakespeare's somewhat neglected text.

2. A "monthly something": The Effect of Changing Publication Formats on Critical Reception by Karen Dutoi, University of Tulsa

 

Abstract

In my paper, I examine the way publication format impacts our perception of works that transitioned from serial to single volume, focusing on Charles Dickens's The Pickwick Papers, which has been hailed as the bellwether of Victorian serialized fiction and mired in debate over its novelistic merits. Pickwick has been criticized by some scholars as too episodic and weak for a novel, while others try to recover novelistic aspects to prove its value. What these two sides have in common is that they judge Pickwick according to novelistic standards. I argue that publication practices--such as the release of a single volume quickly on the heels of a serial run and the physical appearance of today's editions--have skewed critical evaluation of Dickens's "monthly something." Pickwick was composed as a serial, and as Linda Hughes and Michael Lund have argued, there are profound differences between the reading experience of a serial and a novel. Pickwick, and many other serial works, have suffered because of incongruence between form and content.

Critical study of serial publication has grown recently, but current publication formats still lend to studying serial works as novels. I argue for the relevance of the original publication format and for changes in current publication formats and scholarly perspective that reflect this importance. Although republishing works such as Pickwick as serials with parts distributed monthly would be economically unfeasible and a obstacle to scholarship, there are aspects of the original Victorian publication format that can be applied today, and reception of these works can be more true to the form in which they were originally written.

3. Transience/Stability: Egger's Experiment in Migratory Texts by John Benson, Northern Illinois University

 

Abstract

A central thematic concern of Dave Eggers's first novel You Shall Know Our Velocity is the nature of knowledge--the narrator "knows nothing" during the course of his transcontinental journey, but his effort to record the minute details of his experience are presented as a means of understanding. But it is only through the work's bibliographic codes and transmission history that readers might discover the various ways Eggers strives to present a story that cannot be divorced from its material basis.

At various times, the work, at the discretion of the author, has been retitled, extended via the publisher's website, and rearranged in various print and electronic forms, undermining the perceived stability of the work as it exists in print. By doing so, the author manufactures a tension between scarcity and access, moving bits of text from printed forms online and printing limited copies of some iterations of the work. Thus, certain aspects of the story take on an ephemeral quality that may only be accessed by an audience that happens to observe these changes. In addition to these textual changes, I will argue that the novel's thematic concerns with the production and commodification of experience is reflected in the work's bibliographic and paratextual apparatuses. Following the first edition, each subsequent version of the novel shows more evidence that the story has been mediated by multiple parties, calling into question the reliability of the narrator and the notion of a fixed, knowable work itself.

77. English III: English Literature After 1900

10:15-11:45 a.m. (Jeffersonian)

Topic: Migrations & Transgressions in 20th Century British Fiction

Chair: M. Hunter Hayes, Texas A & M University-Commerce

1. Lush Places and Liminal Spaces: Migration in Evelyn Waugh's Scoop by LeAnn Nash, Texas A&M University-Commerce

 

Abstract

Evelyn Waugh gives a comic, satiric send up of the press in his novel Scoop, centered on the misadventures of migration experienced by William Boot in his role as "Boot of the Beast," reporting on the civil war in the tiny African country of Ishmaelia. William is perfectly content to live in his stationary world at home--until that world is totally disrupted by a telegram summoning him to London to meet with Lord Copper about his newspaper work. A physical migration is forced on William, moving him from rural Boot Magna Hall to London, from London to Ishmaelia, and back home again. Yet this physical migration from place to place does not affect the kinds of changes one might expect for William. William is physically transported yet his mental existence and attitude stays centered in the liminal space that defines his character's behaviors. William's marginalized lifestyle serves to put him in the heart of the revolution in Ishmaelia, where he inadvertently pulls off a journalistic coup. After successfully carrying out his foreign assignment William returns to his country existence, to the Lush Places and liminal spaces that he prefers. In this paper, I will explore how William defies the expected nature of migration by choosing to live in the liminal space that suits him best, no matter his location.

2. Auto-Migrations in Ian McEwan's Enduring Love by Christopher Gonzalez, Ohio State University

 

Abstract

This paper will explore McEwan's ENDURING LOVE from a narratological standpoint, specifically in effort to elucidate Joe Rose's charting of his own reality. Often McEwan has Rose state that "This is really where it all started." However, he undermines that just as often. By focalizing through characters such as Clarissa, as well as Joe, McEwan sets up a complex pattern of narratological migrations and bounrary crossings of the characters' self that will serve as my main focus in this paper.

3. Mourning Becomes Distance: Between Local Trauma and Symbolic Geography in J.G. Ballard's Experimental Fiction by Drago Momcilovic, University of Wisconsin-Madison

 

Abstract

J. G. Ballard's 1970 experimental novel The Atrocity Exhibition offers an aesthetically disconcerting vision of a delusional spectator as he works his way through the apocalyptic mediatized landscape of the late 1960s. Although Ballard makes external reality increasingly difficult for readers to trace, the space existing 'outside' his protagonist's psychosis (or the telecommunications industry that feeds it) constitutes a symbolic geography in which images of memorable historical disasters--like the assassination of Kennedy and the accidental deaths of the astronauts of Apollo I--become both immediate sites of traumatization and distant sites of historical engagement.

I want to argue that Ballard's text--which grapples with the ways we make sense of distant tragedies of others and the extent to which that process is predicated on an exposure to those tragedies through media texts that formalize and even stylize those atrocities anew--moves us closer to an ethics of mourning in a mediatized landscape, one that demands attention to both the mythic placelessness of these disturbing images, on the one hand, and the localization of their wounding, on the other. I also want to suggest that The Atrocity Exhibition, as an experimental fiction, re-enacts this traumatic negotiation of locality and placelessness at the level of form-- particularly in the book's 1990 re-issue, in which the protagonist's effort to work through his psychosis can be traced in the aesthetic refashioning of the book, which moves us between the text itself, accompanying sketches that simulate the disasters affecting him, and authorial annotations that allow Ballard to write himself into his book and contemplate the conditions of its emergence and continued renewal.

4. Transgression and Decay of Spatial Practices in J.G. Ballard's High-Rise by Sarah N. Petrovic, Northern Illinois University

 

Abstract

J.G. Ballard is unquestionably one of Britain's most original and distinctive voices in post-modern literature, though few of his works are considered critically. One of these texts is his 1975 novel High-Rise, part of the urban disaster trilogy. In High-Rise, Ballard introduces a society already hierarchized on the basis of physical place and position within the 40-story apartment building, in which civilization collapses and chaos and war ensue with class divisions based on floor levels. While Michel de Certeau asserts "that spatial practices in fact secretly structure the determining conditions of social life" (96), Ballard foregrounds the assumed ideology that creates these practices by overtly constructing a society governed by space. Using Henri Lefebvre's categorization of space as comprised of the physical, the social, and the mental, this paper examines the relationship between space and identity in High-Rise as characters learn and determine who and how they are and can be through their spatial practices. Richard Wilder, one of the three men through whom the novel is focalized, engages in a struggle to climb from his apartment on the first floor to the roof gardens, and while he physically succeeds, the women in the novel form an alternate, and ultimately dominant, society which uses space in a new way by refusing him successful migration into their new power relations. This paper finally asserts that characters' attempts at spatial transgressions against the rigid physical, social, and mental boundaries suggest Ballard's critique of isolation in Britain's contemporary urban culture.

78. French I

10:15-11:45 a.m. (Wabash Cannonball)

Topic: Paris in Focus: Films, Texts and Contexts

Chair: Annie Jouan-Westlund, Cleveland State University

Secretary: Jacob Schott, Ohio State University

1. Monumental Vision: Constructing Cédric Klapisch's Paris by Kathryn Brown, University of Kent, England

 

Abstract

This paper focuses on images of architectural practice and the construction of central Paris in films by Cedric Klapisch from the early 1990s to 2008. Klapisch's depiction of urban geography is in a nineteenth-century iconographic tradition. His films offer an updated vision of Hausmannization of Paris. By problematizing how cities are built, viewed and inhabited, Klapisch depicts not only key aspects of the cultural and social construction of Paris, but also demonstrates the importance of visual imagery in shaping place and history. This paper discusses the director's techniques of montage that interspese images of monumental architecture with spaces for social encounters between individuals and relates the juxtaposition of these images to the theme of urban legibility.

2. The Construction of Paris in 21st Century French Cinema: Luc Besson's Angele--A by Carolyn A. Durham, The College of Wooster

 

Abstract

Since 2000, a series of French films set in Paris have made the space of the city, its mythology of romance and mystery, and its transformation into a multicultural, global capital a key focus. They are all quartier films in conscious conversation with past cinematic representations of Paris and with current constructions of France's national identity. In this paper I propose to focus on Angele-A, whose star is arguably the city itself. Shot in a breathtakingly beautiful and clearly nostalgic black and white, Angele-A is in clear dialogue with the French New wave films but also with Wim Wenders's Wings of Desire (1988) and Frank Capra's It's a Wonderful Life (1946). With Angele-A, starring Jamel Debbouze as an American citizen who falls in love in a fairytale romance, Luc Besson makes what one critic characteristically calls "the closest thing to a traditional French film that Mr. Besson has made".

3. Entre les Murs: The Empire Strikes Back by Elizabeth Toohey, Principia College

 

Abstract

In Entre les Murs, set in contemporary postcolonial Paris, language reflects the power dynamics of the classroom and the larger world. In order to unpack the role of language in this film, I will examine a scene in which the teacher prompts Souleymane to print his digital photos for the class as a "self-portrait". His portrait of his mother reflects Walter Benjamin's notes on the "aura emanat(ing) from the early photographs in the fleeting expression of a human face". The use of photos in this particular scene in the film requires a translation of images from the personal and reflective to the public domain of the academy, a move from a work of art with an aura and a specific place in Souleymane's personal belongings, to, in Benjamin's phrase, the "realm of mechanical reproduction" that removes aura and inscribes one set meaning. Through this scene and others, this paper will study the complex relationship between gender, race, culture and imperialism the film so adeptly represents.

4. Etudes multi-disciplinaires à Paris by Amine Bekhechi, Saint Olaf College

 

Abstract

Not Available

79. German Literature and Culture I

10:15-11:45 a.m. and 2:15-3:45 p.m. (Missouri Pacific)

Topic: Migration

Chair: K. Scott Baker, University of Missouri - Kansas City

Session A

10:15-11:45 a.m. (Missouri Pacific)

1. Eine Wucht des Durcheinanders: Navigating the Real and Imagined in Anne Duden's Das Judasschaf by Thyra E. Knapp, Southern Illinois University-Carbondale

 

Abstract

As the animal that leads its brethren to slaughter but is itself spared, the Judasschaf must forever live with the guilt of having survived the slaughterhouse. It is this formidable culpability that drives the protagonist-narrator of Anne Duden's 1985 novel, Das Judasschaf, to suffer the psychological malady of separation, division, and fissure. The separation that exists in the psyche of the central character manifests itself in the form of movement in all aspects of the work: the non-linear text constructed of dream sequences, childhood memories, historical documents, and excerpts from safety manuals; the narrative shifts between third- and first-person; lack of temporal markers dividing past, present, and future; the splicing of the protagonist-narrator's modern-day reality with the events depicted in five paintings of the Italian Renaissance. Although Duden makes it difficult to discern a linear plotline, Das Judasschaf can nevertheless be read as an--albeit convoluted and treacherous--ekphrastic journey from origin to destination. In four chapters, the nameless protagonist-narrator travels from Berlin to Venice and New York in an attempt to assuage the quilt she feels as a German woman born nineteen days after the convening of the Wannsee Conference. Geographical changes in location are only the beginning of her travels; while visiting museums in these cities, the woman "enters" paintings, migrating from a tortured reality to an imagined sphere that promises peace. In this paper, I explore the protagonist-narrator's movement between reality and imagination by posing the following questions: How and when does she choose to take this leap? How are the movements represented in the text? How does this migration ultimately mend her fractured psyche?

2. Migration of the Mind-Crossing Borders in Uwe Saeger's Das Überschreiteeiner Grenze bei Nacht by Regine Kroh, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

 

Abstract

Focusing on Das Uberschreiten einer Grenze bei Nacht (The Crossing of a Border at Night, 1988) by the East German author Uwe Saeger, this paper explores the various approaches to the trope of border crossing in the text. I argue that the spatial context of the novella--the no-mans-land at a border crossing--is used by the author as an entryway to the past of a family in East Germany. Reflecting on this past, the narrator reveals the decline of his family and unveils the crossing and overstepping of various other boundaries and borders, such as the ones between generations, spouses, siblings as well as between individual and society. All this has led the family into a space of hopelessness, disappointment and emptiness. This paper shows how Saeger's text highlights the trope of border crossing from several angles and implicitly ties it back to the spatial context of its creation--the GDR. Without attempting a biographical interpretation, I will closely examine how the political extra-textual circumstances are mirrored in the text and how they are particularly important to understand the family history. I hope to show that Saeger situates his figures in an emotional and geographical uncertain state of being and that this in-between moment is also what allowed the book to be published in the GDR. Therefore, I argue that Saeger's text exemplifies how authors in the GDR could write at the same time inside and outside of the system, employing such sensitive topics as the crossing of borders. Thus, I challenge the cliche that successful authors in the GDR automatically and uncritically supported the official policies of the state.

3. Musealizing a GDR Childhood: Jana Hensel's Zonenkinder by Ariana Orozco, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor

 

Abstract

In her novel Zonenkinder (2002) Jana Hensel responds to the generational claims Florian Illies makes in Generation Golf (2001). As an appropriation and resignification of Illies's West German novel, the narrator of Zonenkinder, alternatively speaking for herself and for her generation, anecdotally recounts her childhood in the former GDR and entwines the loss of her childhood with the loss and suppression of her national experiences. Not only does Hensel insert an East German voice into post-reunification narrative constructions of a unified German identity, but she also musealizes her childhood experiences. Working with Peter McIsaac's concept "museum function" and Andreas Huyssen's analysis of the commercialization of memory, this paper argues that Hensel supports her agenda of representation, as stated in an interview with Tom Kraushaar, by having Zonenkinder serve as a site for memory. Hensel recovers not only lost objects of her childhood in East Germany but also (re)presents them in her novel, giving them a new materiality. Through the intersection of photographs, captions and narrative, Hensel creates virtual museum displays that are based on an archeological examination of the past. I then argue that Hensel creates virtual museum displays not only to commemorate the GDR but also to comment on the commercialization of East German memories and experiences, reminding readers of a forgotten generation whose childhood memories and products are being replaced.

Session B

2:15-3:45 p.m. (Missouri Pacific)

4. In and Out of Reality: Fritz Lang's Criminals by Todd Heidt, Knox College

 

Abstract

Fritz Lang is both a celebrated auteur director, and a self-admitted sensationalist. Capitalizing on the themes of his time, he often culled inspiration from newspaper headlines, adapting reality to suit the needs of his fantastic films. This paper will trace the migration of topics and themes into and out of two early Fritz Lang films: Dr. Mabuse, the Gamler (1922) and M (1931). In discussing Lang's M, Anton Kaes has termed Weimar a "serial culture," fascinated with its own criminals and the medial explorations of them in journals, magazines, newspapers, newsreels and "penny dreadfuls". I would like to extend Kaes' reading to underscore the tendency toward appropriation and repetition which dominated Weimar. In transgressing boundaries between fact and fiction, Lang's work also reiterates and repeats stories as a fantasy of control and resolution. Thus, Dr. Mabuse is not only an adaptation, nor just an artistic rendering of the financial chaos that gripped the early Weimar Republic, but also a fantasy projection and resolution of that chaos, locating its source and bringing that source to justice. Much the same can be said of the elusive killer in M, who keeps all of Berlin on edge for months. And yet, the migration from reality to the safe space of play fiction fails to neutralize these threats. Both of these films are resolved not due to the expertise of police, but to luck or chance; an ambivalent ending matched only by the uncertainty of life in the Weimar Republic.

5. Migrating into Our Times: Teaching Contemporary Reconstructions of Post-Enlightenment German Prose by Rebecca Raham, University of Minnesota-Twin Cities

 

Abstract

In my fall semester Introduction to German Literature course, I taught pairs of texts that illustrate how literature >>moves<< through time,across genres, among audiences, between audiences. The texts included Goethe's Werther, Plenzdorfs Die neuen Leiden des jungen W., Schillers Kassandra, Christa Wolfs Kassandra, Georg Buechners Woyzeck and the film version of Woyzeck by Werner Herzog. By examining how writers and filmmakers in the 1970s and 1980s reread, retold and interpreted 18th and 19th century texts, I wanted to expose my students to different time periods of German literature and model different interpretive approaches that encouraged their own readings of the texts.

80. Multicultural Literature in the Classroom: Politics and Pedagogy

10:15-11:45 a.m. (Zephyr Rocket)

Topic: Multicultural Literature in the Classroom: Transnational Texts and Approaches

Chair: Sun Hee Teresa Lee, Gustavus Adolphus College

Secretary: Peggy Lindsey, Wright State University

1. A Global Response to Catastrophe: Teaching Micheline Aharonian Marcom's The Daydreaming Boy by Shushan Avagyan, Illinois State University

 

Abstract

Not Available

2. The Personal Aside is the Thing: The Role of Anecdotal Digressions in the Teaching of Transnational Literature by Samuel Park, Columbia College

 

Abstract

Not Available

3. American Literature, Ethnic American Literature, and Transnationalism: Rethinking Key Issues in National and Minority Traditions by Sun Hee Teresa Lee, Gustavus Adolphus College

 

Abstract

Not Available

81. Spanish II: Peninsular Literature After 1700

10:15-11:45 a.m. (Midnight Special)

Topic: Open

Chair: Stephen Luis Vilaseca, Northern Illinois University

Secretary: Kajsa Larson, University of Minnesota

1. Killer Looks: Ana María Moix's 'Las virtudes peligrosas' by Kathleen Doyle, Rhodes College

 

Abstract

In this paper I examine "Las virtudes peligrosas," the title piece in a collection of stories published in 1985 by Ana Maria Moix. The story plays with visual and narrative perspective, as a narrator whose identity is unknown until the tale's end confronts a girl named Alice, forcing her to re-view strange events and impressions associated with the two blind elderly women whom she regularly visits. The narrator's insider knowledge is informed by his voyeuristic activities and readings of his father's journal, which details the decorated military leader's growing obsession with his wife's relationship with another woman. His rage and impotence eventually lead to insanity and death.

Objects such as opera glasses, binoculars, mirrors and portraits figure prominently, and become the tools with which the two women sever the patriarchal ties that bind them within respectable society. Most striking are two portraits painted by the narrator as a young artist, one of his mother, and one of her true love. These works are displayed facing one another, maintaining a timeless connection through art long after the women themselves have supposedly lost their ability to gaze at one another. Spying, watching, reading, and gazing are activities central to the women's story, organized and interpreted by a male narrator. In addition to a discussion of disruptive power of the female gaze in the tale, my analysis will examine the story's disruptive use of traditional spatial and narrative conventions.

2. El autoexilio en Carmen Borja: génesis y éxodos tuyos y de todos by Elena Vega-Sampayo, University of Texas at Brownsville

 

Abstract

Not Available

3. Representations of Suicide in the Twentieth-Century Spanish Novel by Alrick C. Knight, Loyola University Chicago

 

Abstract

I intend to use Javier Marias's Corazon tan blanco (1992) in order to discuss the theme of literary suicides, the ways in which meaning is generated through such acts of self-annihilation, and the creation of an extreme rhetoric of silence. Marias's critically acclaimed novel, in which a mysterious suicide leads to reflections on truth, allows us to ponder the ways in which literary suicides are pursued, thematized or embodied textually. Secondly, the topic allows us to explore how such gestures have shifted in meaning over time. In the modern era, the key element that is lost with the collapse of the theological guarantee is the sense of a unified purposefulness, a rational telos governing both universe and self. Corazon tan blanco invokes this tension--as well as a very modern ethos (metaphysical and epistemological)--between perspectives or lines of argument that cannot be avoided but that give rise to no synthesis.

Though by no means absent in literature previous to the period, the thematization of suicide is often closely connected with the Romantics--in both life and literature--as well as to attitudes conventionally associated with the period, such as acute self-awareness, a sustained sense of alienation, and a desire to find escape. From La Celestina's Melibea to Hamlet's Ophelia or, more recently, Dostoyevsky's Anna Karenina and Larra's famed allusion to a self-inflicted death in "La Nochebuena de 1836," the literary motif of suicide in Western literature can be seen as a continued response to social and metaphysical dislocation that likewise abounds in the twentieth-century Spanish novel. That is, the crucial difference that appears in many twentieth-century Spanish novels is that suicide continues to receive a key role, while at the same time becoming secularized and thereby set apart from Spain's profoundly religious past.

4. Sangre a Borbotones: A New Understanding of City Future as City Past by Susan M. Divine of Westminster College at Fulton

 

Abstract

Rafael Reig's 2002 novel Sangre a borbotones brings together ideas of utopia, memory, place and process in the contemporary city of Madrid. It does so in order to criticize the notion that a city as a space is built through a particular interaction between government, economy, culture and citizenry. Similar to the way David Harvey interprets Balzac's telling of the Restoration of the French Monarchy in Paris at a time of changes in economy and social institutions, I use urban theory to analyze Sangre's re-telling of Post-Transition Madrid. Much like Harvey's understanding of Balzac, Reig's narrative creation manipulates the reader's understanding of history by condensing memory of time past and desire for time future. The effect of Reig's novel is to bring the reader to a greater understanding of time present and to the uni-directional power of private industry in the neo-liberal economy. To reach this end Sangre forces a re-analysis of how the city as space is interpreted. It does so by altering the history of Madrid's development as a cultural and geographic space. Sangre is a Sci-Fi detective novel structured by the North-South movement of our narrator Carlos Clot on one of the capital city's most important economic and cultural centers: el Paseo de la Castellana. In this way, the reader can recognize culture as being affected by material space and also the city itself as a built process. By changing the evolution of cultural time in Sangre a borbotones Reig is able to more clearly illustrate the very real cultural and societal consequences of the built process.

82. Teaching Writing in College

10:15-11:45 a.m. and 2:15-3:45 p.m. (Burlington Route)

Topic: The Intersection of Critical Reading and Critical Writing in the Composition Classroom

Chair: Christine Brovelli O'Brien, Northern Illinois University

Secretary: Merry A. Rendhal, University of Minnesota

Session A

10:15-11:45 a.m. (Burlington Route)

1. Unreadable Rhetorics, or Textbooks, Textbooks Everywhere, But Not a Page to Read by Matthew S.S. Johnson, Southern Illinois University - Edwardsville

 

Abstract

In "Unreadable Rhetorics" I argue that far too many widely-adopted, first-year composition textbooks ("rhetorics," especially those which represent the major publishing houses, whose titles are some variation of Someone's Guide to Writing) while discussing "critical reading," do not allow through their own prose (or by their own example) for a particular type of critical reading necessary for invention--sustained inquiry--to take place, and in fact work against students' development of critical thinking (and as an end result, writing) abilities. Such textbooks neither model nor encourage particular kinds of critical reading, as their authors specifically make their texts skimmable, filled as they are with textboxes, lists, images, graphics, and only sadly brief segments of written prose. The rhetorics I examine are seemingly not meant to be read by students, but only "appeal" to them, ironically calling for students to critically read while simultaneously indulging them in what many assume to be their preferences: pithy, bulleted remarks and bits of advice that would not appear out of place on an average Facebook page, designed for easy access and requiring little attention. In addition, the texts' layouts remediate webpages with their smattering of attractive images intended to entice, but making only cursory connections to the written prose they overwhelm. While these rhetorics can be read critically--either rhetorically or semiotically, for instance--rather than modeling sustained inquiry (through in-depth idea development and continuous prose), they read like summaries, so gutted of actual content that there is little for students to engage. And these rhetorics especially do not inspire the type of critical reading that we ask students to apply to classroom readings and researched sources as they compose their own essays.

2. Writing beyond "Home": What a Storyteller Can Reveal by Elizabeth J. Allen, Rutgers University-Camden

 

Abstract

Creating a writing curriculum that utilizes the literature of migration and cultural encounter can unveil the journey into college reading, writing, and thinking to students, easing the high-school-to-college transition. Whether chatting online, updating a Facebook entry, or blogging about the latest movie, most university students engage in alternate modes of oral discourse on a regular basis. As composition forms that rely heavily upon specific social contexts or narrowly defined audiences, online writing proves to be a communication culture far different than that of the university. However, the agency that students develop through their online rhetorical performances closely mirrors the cultural and composition skills required of the storyteller. Storytellers generate space for themselves in specific communities by folding the personal into a conventional narrative form and established history. The storyteller's role as an authority in a particular context provides a model for student reflection about her own authority as a writer and her ability to reinvent known forms of communication to meet new writing demands. This curriculum asks students to delve into their personal conflicts with writing and emphasizes self-awareness in the diagnosis of gaps between writing performance and the expectations of university culture.

3. Exploring Academic Tribes: Envisioning Texts as Voices within Writing Communities by Kimberly Baldus, Pierre Laclede Honors College at the University of Missouri-St. Louis

 

Abstract

When students encounter challenging texts like academic essays, they often feel intimidated and overwhelmed by the sophisticated language and complex ideas employed by scholars. Such difficulties can reinforce a sense of disconnection from these works, causing undergraduate writers to feel that they have nothing in common with such authors. One way to begin eliminating this barrier is to present challenging scholarly texts as representations of communal conversations constantly taking place within various academic groups. Students can approach each text as one that represents a distinctive community, and they can investigate that community's own language, structures and arguments. Such insights can be developed through readings like Ken Hyland's Disciplinary Discourses. Hyland's linguistic analysis of academic writing asserts that "texts are the actions of socially situated writers" who must express themselves according to the expectations of their academic "tribes." Students working to discern the distinctive lingo of these "tribes" can reassess scholarly writing as a kind of communally constructed mode of expression with discernible patterns and approaches. In recognizing how academic writers seek to display themselves in their communities, students can learn to assert their own memberships by incorporating these strategies in their own writing--a strategy that can be further developed through a text such as Gerald Graff and Cathy Birkenstein's "They Say/I Say."

Session B

2:15-3:45 p.m. (Burlington Route)

4. Migrating from Text to Context: Using Digital Literacy in the First-Year Composition Classroom by Aimee Krall-Lanoue, Calument College of St. Joseph

 

Abstract

Just as immigrants move from one geographical location to another, students can be said to move from two locations--that of the digital world to that of the print world. But, also like immigrants, we cannot ask them to forget and forgo their homeland. For many students, both those that come from privileged backgrounds and those that come from underprepared backgrounds, students prefer to read and write with advanced technology. They communicate using multiple forms of media like e-mail, blogging, instant messaging, and texting. We ask them in composition classes, then, to leave behind those ways of writing to meet academic writing conventions. What I will argue, though, is that students must not just be trained to read and write critical texts, they must also practice and develop habits of critical contexts. Through a discussion of student writing from first-year composition courses at Calumet College of St. Joseph, I will examine how students navigate the terrains of the digital literacies they are familiar with and the academic literacies they find unfamiliar and uncomfortable. Instead of understanding these multiple literacies in opposition to one another, composition instructors must begin to embrace the interconnectedness between different ways of reading and writing and encourage students to think about how issues of context inform literacy practices.

5. The Student Blogosphere as Course Text: A Case Study on Using Student Weblogs to Foster Critical Reading Awareness in the Composition Classroom by Tom Lilly, Georgia Gwinnett College

 

Abstract

A challenge of today's composition classroom is to confer critical reading upon students whose critical literacy at once, by curricular standards, needs development and, by virtue of students' exposure to information technologies, signifies changes to literacy itself. Composition instructors have been proactive in developing strategies for teaching media literacy. One consequence I have observed is composition pedagogy is withdrawing from teaching critical reading around one traditional object of critical reading, the prose essay. Assigned readings in composition classrooms can even compound this problem in that, even when addressing contemporary subjects, readings formally are either too traditional or unconventional to invite inquiry of their ideas, discouraging students from seeing them as more than models of expository writing. This paper describes my composition classroom experiences where students built the reading content of the class by sustaining a virtual blogosphere that explored facets of topics related to the 2008 state and national elections. In groups, students were required to post original expository essays, research information about their topic, and participate in online discussions. In addition to using student work on this assignment to model concepts of critical writing, I found myself increasingly referring to student prose as objects of critical inquiry, as the blogosphere grew. The reason why was that I observed students becoming sensitive, informed critical readers because they were responsible for generating the course content and because they were closer to one another's ideas.

6. Visual Rhetoric: Bridging Critical Practices in Reading and Writing by Gina M. Merys, Creighton University

 

Abstract

The utilization of many different types of texts, especially image texts, opens space for students to translate the ability to read one type of text into how to read and compose other types of texts. For example, students transfer an awareness of idea organization and placement in a visual text into a comprehension of paragraph unity and structure in a written text. Additionally, a critical understanding of visual elements in an image text creates a situation that shows the importance of visual cues within a written text such as spacing, punctuation, and even font. Thus, by putting a critical understanding of visual rhetoric to work, students learn how to use their reading and writing skills in multiple formats. As Charles Hill notes in his article, Reading the Visual in College Writing Courses, "ignoring the visual aspects of rhetoric, even the visual aspects of written texts, hinders our efforts to help students develop an accurate understanding of the nature of rhetorical practice, including an adequate understanding of the potential, as well as the limitations, of written discourse." Reading and composing both visual and written texts, therefore, provides opportunities for students to become critically aware of our persuasive environment and how to enter into the discourse of a variety of rhetorical situations.

Special Sessions

83. Civil War: American Vortex in Print

Session B: Charting the War

10:15-11:45 a.m. (New York Central)

(See Session # 70 - 8:30 a.m., Saturday)

83.1. Constructing the Local in 19th and 20th Century Spain

Session B

10:15-11:45 a.m. (Grand Hall Meeting Room II)

(See Session # 71 - 8:30 a.m., Saturday)

84. Experimental Poetry & Form

10:15-11:45 a.m. (Dixie Flyer)

Chair: William Allegrezza, Indiana University Northwest

1. Form, Content, and the Elemental: The Question of Synthesis in the Poetry of Harry Mathews by Jim Kurt, SUNY at Buffalo

 

Abstract

Not Available

2. Re-Membering the Body: Footnotes as Rhetorical Figures in Texts by Contemporary Women Writers by Kristi Maxwell, University of Cincinnati

 

Abstract

Not Available

3. Reading Texts Reading: Gregory Betts's If Language by Drew McDowell, University of Calgary

 

Abstract

Not Available

4. Revising the Sonnet in Sequences by William Allegrezza, Indiana University Northwest

 

Abstract

Not Available

85. Framing the Narrative, Narrating the Frame

10:15-11:45 a.m. (Meteor)

Chair: Kathleen M. Llewellyn, Saint Louis University

1. Framed? Henri Estienne's use of Marguerite de Navarre in the Apologie pour Hérodote by Emily Thompson, Webster University

 

Abstract

In 1566 Henri Estienne published the Apologie pour Herodote, an imposing religious, social and historical commentary that relies heavily on stories. Estienne claims the stories illustrate the perversity of his century and of the Catholic Church, but admits that some readers might also find them entertaining. Like earlier conteurs, Estienne reframes tales from diverse and unacknowledged sources. Marguerite de Navarre, cited several times, provides a notable exception. Estienne explicitly evokes her Heptameron, suggesting that their works share the common goal of uncovering human (especially monastic) lubricity. Nonetheless, Estienne radically alters Marguerite's tales--changing their order, eliminating the accompanying devis, and often excising narrative and psychological complexities. What initially appears as a tribute to Marguerite the Evangelical evolves later in the Apologie into a strategy for introducing some particularly scandalous passages. Key to the understanding of Estienne's use of Marguerite's tales is his inclusion of the apocryphal tale 11 from Claude Gruget's 1559 edition of the Heptameron. Estienne refers twice to it in the original edition of the Apologie, leaving out only the few lines and the discussion that mock the use of profane stories in religious contexts. The Geneva censors later object to the vulgarity and sexual innuendos of the remaining passages and force Estienne to edit them further. Estienne's apparent use of Marguerite de Navarre's sober reputation to temper his own obscene stories leads further credence to recent critical work that questions a strictly Calvinist reading of the Apologie.

2. Freeze Frame: Narrative Framing and Diminished Agency in Du Bartas's La Judit by Kathleen M. Llewellyn, Saint Louis University

 

Abstract

The narrative frame was used in early modern French literature to define characters, to render them the object of admiration or derision, ultimately to immobilize them. This use of the frame is particularly clear in Du Bartas's version of the biblical story of Judith, La Judit, where both the title character and the general she executes are framed and immobilized by the narrator's eye. The poet emphasizes his heroine's physical attributes to a far greater degree than the biblical author of Judith's story. His long description of Judith's beauty serves to objectify her: rather than an active, acting subject, this detailed portrait transforms the powerful biblical heroine into the object of the reader's imagined gaze, an object of admiration, a thing of beauty. When the general Holofernes first encounters Judith, his actions immobilize and frame the heroine so that he can admire her, as if she were but a painting.

Holofernes, too, is framed by the narrator. As the general is weakened by love, his reflection is framed in a "cristal", and the poem's narrator commands the reader to look at him. Holofernes is ultimately immobilized and objectified by the poet, as he is permanently immobilized and eternally objectified by Judith. The lifeless general is described as he lies, decapitated, in his bed. Finally, Judith and her maid take the severed head back to Bethulia as proof that Holofernes is dead. His head has become a prize from the battle that Judith won. It is a trophy on display.

86. Shakespeare in Flux: The Drama of Natural & Social Transitions

10:15-11:45 a.m. (Illinois Central)

Chair: Craig Dionne, Eastern Michigan University

Secretary: Hillary Nunn, University of Akron

1. Redeeming Nature from the General Curse: Gender and Madness in Shakespeare's Titus, King Lear and Taming of the Shrew by Kelly K. Waldschmidt, Eastern Michigan University

 

Abstract

This paper examines the expression of male madness in Shakespeare's Titus, King Lear, and The Taming of the Shrew--loss of wit and identity--as the symptom of deeper political shifts in gender and family in sixteenth-century England. Within these plays, male madness is defined by those female characters who have been granted temporary power, rule and voice, and who use their language to directly challenge and disrupt the prescribed gender roles and function of the sexes. I argue that Shakespeare offers various social receptions of feminine power acquisition through the separate genres. The tragedy portrays a grim acceptance; the plays are dark and haunting, giving the audience powerful women who cause death and destruction to their men and country, through their action and direction. Tamora, Regan and Goneril adopt male qualities and language and use their newly established position within the patriarch to defy its conventions and step outside their gender and the traits ascribed to it. This causes tension within the play and represents the fear of the citizens of Shakespearean England, whose political and social system is being threatened and restructured. Whereas the comedy offers an alternative space, situating an environment that allows feminine power and authority, the female voice is shed of its coded, androgynous "masculinity" and is thereby used to leverage a discourse that is gender equal, rather than male or female dominated. I feel that language is used in the comedy, not as a challenge that upsets social order, but rather as support in the creation of a new establishment where each sex is granted a voice, representing their social and familial function. Kate's parody of the chauvinism reconstitutes women as empowered through their use of language, and equality between the sexes has emerged. Although Kate threatens the patriarchal structure, she does so under the suggestion of her husband, defining a space where order is not restored, unless each gender can work together towards a common goal.

2. The Winter's Tale: Exploring Ecophobic Identity by Michael Mackey, University of Akron

 

Abstract

Nature is present throughout The Winter's Tale, but in act 3, scene 3 nature becomes a force that threatens to destroy each character's individual perception of nature. Ecocriticism, as a method of literary inquiry, is relatively new to Shakespeare scholarship, but as Simon C. Estok observes, ecocritical analysis will move Shakespeare scholarship beyond symbolic interpretations of nature, and "provide a vocabulary for environmental ethics and attitudes" discovered in Shakespeare's texts. Estok recently used the word ecophobia, which he defines as the human "fear of a loss of agency and control [over] nature." By adopting the term ecophobia, ecocriticism moves beyond interpretations of nature's textual representations, and begins to focus on human perceptions of nature. The aim of this paper is to explore individual relationships with ecophobia as exhibited through the analysis of three characters present in act 3, scene3 of The Winter's Tale: the Mariner, Antigonus and the Shepherd. By examining each character's individual perception of nature, four common views of nature can be attributed to the development of an individual's ecophobic identity: nature as punishing, nature as protective, nature as nourishing and nature as redemptive. Each character's ecophobic identity is a combination of two or more of the listed views, and is also influenced by the extent of which a character has reason to come into direct contact with nature. Nature's perceived ability to be destructive is directly linked to a character's ecophobic identity. An understanding of ecophobia, as outlined in The Winter's Tale, will lead to a greater appreciation of nature, but first ecophobia must be used as a concept demonstrating the human incapacity to control and regulate nature.

3. Wandering Limbs: Movement and the Body Politic in Shakespeare's Coriolanus by Joseph Lieberman, Eastern Michigan University

 

Abstract

This paper will investigate the use of the metaphor of the body politic in Shakespeare's The Tragedy of Coriolanus, not as a political device, but rather a mechanism to explore the formation of identity of the character Coriolanus as a model for early modern views of psychology that resemble pre-Freudian ideals. I would like to emphasize the importance of a psychoanalytic reading of the body politic as a means to explore Shakespeare's psychology and the formation of identity in early modern England. My purpose is to illustrate the body politic, not as a stable construction, but rather a grotesque, even mechanical structure in a constant state of motion. The paper will examine the paradox of a metaphor that describes the political apparatus using a human model and by this construction one must look towards psychoanalysis in order to understand the state by first understanding the psyche of the individual. I argue that through addressing certain questions of the body politic we are able to see a presented cure for the social model presented in Coriolanus. My essay addresses such questions as, what borders or boundaries does the body politic have in Coriolanus and what or who governs those boundaries? Who is represented by the parts of the body politic? Who holds the position of the mind in Shakespeare's body politic? What does the migration and cannibalization of the limbs of the body politic suggest about Shakespeare's views of the state apparatus? The wandering limbs of the body politic are in constant motion throughout Coriolanus. I feel that through a psychoanalytic reading of the movement of the body politic in Shakespeare's Coriolanus we can look at ways of revisiting the works or psychoanalysts like Freud, Lacan and Kristeva in the twenty-first century through a post-humanist reading of the body, not in regards aesthetic value, but rather a turn from the organic to a mechanized structure used to understand the construction of identity.

4. Speak, Memory: Translation of Memory in Hamlet by Adam Sheaffer, Eastern Michigan University

 

Abstract

This paper explores modes of memory in Hamlet, and how the eponymous character resists-and ultimately rejects-these modes of memory. Using Hamlet's encounter with the ghost as a leaping off point, the paper posits his delay as a response to these modes of remembrance surrounding his father's death, and how properly to memorialize his life. Hamlet flees from socially accepted, promoted, and sanctified memorial methods seeking new forms to elucidate experience he feels lacks referent in these methods. So, in a sense, Hamlet's problem is a problem of translation. In the wake of his grief, confusion, and trauma, how best may Hamlet honor his father's injunction to "remember" him? In summoning, conjuring, and ultimately constructing his father's memory, Hamlet performs an elaborate (though in the end, deeply unsatisfying) "re-membering" of his father. The difficulties Hamlet encounters, and one of the major reasons for his deferral and delay, reside in his incredulity toward the techniques of memory formation and preservation and their powers of denotation and translation.

Meetings

87. M/MLA Business Meeting

12:00 noon – 2:00 p.m. (Regency C Ballroom)

Moderator: David Posner, Loyola University Chicago

Complimentary buffet plus books and an M/MLA update.

Permanent Sections

87.1. Art What Thou Eat: Food in Literature, Art, and Culture

Session C

2:15-3:45 p.m. (Grand Hall Meeting Room III)

(See Session # 5 - 8:30 a.m., Friday)

88. Fabricating the Body

2:15-5:30 p.m. (Frisco)

Topic: Race and the Body

Chair: Cammie M. Sublette, University of Arkansas - Fort Smith

Secretary: Tracy J. Collins, Central Michigan University

Session A

2:15-3:45 p.m. (Frisco)

1. A Glory Too Furious and Complete: Reconstructing the Body in Space in Yvonne Vera's Butterfly Burning by Katharine Polak, University of Cincinnati

 

Abstract

Zimbabwe's colonial history is rife with horrors, but among the most interesting narratives inflicted on this national space was one of the earliest justifications for settlement. Lene Bull-Christiansen explains in Tales of the Nation that "a racial stereotypification of the black population and a myth of an ancient white civilization in the area" (44) based on monuments that had been discovered and were assumed to be "too advanced" for a black population to produce was created so as to refigure the nation as authentically/historically white. Within this problematic national narrative, the construction of identity for the colonized subject becomes a more daunting endeavor, as revisionist history and narratives of legitimization not only assert inferiority, but also denaturalize the indigenous citizens. Frantz Fanon notes in The Wretched of the Earth that "[t]he colonial world is a compartmentalized world," (3) similar to urban industrialized cities in its manner of structuring the psyches of inhabitants, though topographically divergent. In this context, men may define themselves by the way in which they mark the land whose renarrativization has denied their presence, but women's identities are not so easily reconciled with the creation of space. The construction of identity for women hinges partially on the biological fact of the capabilities and excesses of the body and partially on the social context into which their bodies intervene, a context that both builds a space for women to occupy and responds to their various methods of inhabiting that space. In Yvonne Vera's Butterfly Burning, the spatial and temporal dynamics of Phephelaphi's world expand and contract as her embodied identity alternately accepts and resists the socially produced strictures that define her movement through space and time. It is also notable for how it shows the way in which multiple discourses of power act on the individual body and the way in which women must navigate two separate (and in some instances, mutually exclusive) power structures with different dictates. Judith Butler argues in The Psychic Life of Power that "melancholy is precisely what interiorizes the psyche, that it, makes it possible to refer to the psyche through [...] topographical tropes [which are] domiciles for preservation and shelter as well as arenas for struggle and persecution" (170-171). Phephelaphi's melancholic desire for a self-articulated identity is spatialized through Sidojiwe E2, the room she shares with Fumbatha, and the way in which she moves within these spaces. Phephelaphi's embodiment of the contradictions of time and space illustrate this divide between the objective and the experiential, and the effect of her psyche demonstrates the way in which the socio-spatial dialectic operates at the individual level, creating a psycho-spatial dialectic in which experienced time creates a rupture between the individual and the society in a spatial context.

2. The Leanness of Hope in Asian American Literature: Aesthetic Resistance to Ideology in John Okada's No-No Boy and Wendy Law-Yone's The Coffin Tree by Sarah Gardam, Temple University

 

Abstract

Many Asian American texts foreground the conflict between the physical and psychological need of human beings to take pleasure in life and the imposed cultural ideologies which threaten subjectivity and colonize that body for their own ends. The immigrant characters' unrelenting physical deprivation and psychological anguish often reaches a state of crisis, sometimes enabling the subject to reject ideological control. However, Asian American texts like John Okada's No-No Boy and Wendy Law-Yone's The Coffin Tree are not merely political critiques of ideology, nor are they simply stories about the eventual resolution of identity conflicts. They also engage existential questions by examining the crises of perception that occur when ideology and its pleasures are stripped away and the subject is left with only her/his body's will to survive as the basis upon which to construct a new vision of self and world.

Critics of No-No Boy and The Coffin Tree often acknowledge the ambiguity in the endings of these novels, yet interpret them as either starkly hopeless, or as falsely hopeful, in their concessions to "Western" ideology or models of selfhood. I would like to argue that a leaner hope emerges at the end of these novels, a self-generated hope which accepts life's pain and ambiguity, and which locates meaning in the aesthetic experience of the individual. Suffering emerges as the truth of the text, and aesthetic experience becomes both cause of that suffering and the proposed solution to it--the embodiment of possibility.

3. The Wound that Cries Out: Performance and Trauma in Kara Walker's Black Silhouettes by Laura Goldblatt, University of Virginia

 

Abstract

The illicit nature of the artist Kara Walker's life-sized, cut paper silhouettes created between 1995 and 2003 has led both to praise and excoriation. Yet while most critical attention treats the images as ontologically stable, I argue instead for their potential volatility and the important ramifications this has for cultural memory and performance studies. Though Walker uses provocative content to trap the audience's gaze, once enticed, the power of the images lies in the ways that the radical indeterminacy of these overlapping black figures forces the viewer to construct a plenary diegesis out of indistinct details. Like the shadows the audience itself casts as it examines the scenes, Walker's images force the gallery-goers to perform even as they supposedly only respond to the pictures before them. According to Joseph Roach, such performances of embodied cultural memories reveal "the disparities between history as it is discursively transmitted and memory as it is publicly enacted by the bodies that bear its consequences" as the body becomes a source for "mnemonic reserves." Should the viewer agree to the theatrical contract begged by Walker's work, the onus of interpretation implicates each member of the audience in the creation, and thereby the performance, of the acts it documents. The abstraction of Walker's installations thus transforms the gallery space into a repertoire, in Diana Taylor's terms, and as the audience cognitively performs the scenes before them in order to make sense of the images, racial trauma is reinscribed upon the bodies of Walker's, possibly unwitting, participants.

4. "Passing" Over and Under the Color Line: The Visual Creation of Black Identity During the 1930s by Roy Bearden-White, Southern Illinois University-Carbondale

 

Abstract

During the first three decades of the twentieth century, over one million Black Americans migrated north to urban centers. Geographically, this migration can be easily measured in miles, a distance from point A to point B. For some, the trip encompassed as little as the length of a single state. Financially, access to larger cities, such as Chicago, meant very little because many simply walked, carrying no more than the clothes they wore. For those who could afford it, the passage from the hardships of the rural south to the opportunities of a northern industrial city equated to the cost of train fare. Logistically, of course, the journey posed many different questions to many different people. Those who braved the trip needed to consider such things as who they would take with them, who they would leave behind, what they would find once they arrived, and how they would survive in the very different culture of a foreign city. For the overwhelming majority of southern Black Americans who took part in the great northern migration, the city was indeed foreign from anything they had ever experienced. Leaving the socially oppressive, reconstructed southern states behind them, they purposefully distanced themselves from their existence as former slaves and children of former slaves in order to create new lives as equal participants in American society.

This new existence for Black Americans, however, meant creating an entirely new cultural identity. Booker T. Washington had already offered one path towards that new identity with his 'Atlanta Compromise.' Washington thought Black Americans should remain separate and distinct from mainstream White culture, like the separation of fingers on a single hand. This compromise, to many, simply perpetuated segregation and made integration into urban centers problematic, to say the least. The choice for this new identity then entailed a complicated, yet not unknown, problem for the migrants: How could they integrate fully into the popular culture of White city dwellers, yet still retain their distinct heritages and traditions? This negotiation of a new identity can be found in many examples of Black literature written during this period, particularly with the literary trope of 'passing.' Since the emphasis upon racial differences often centered around the perception of skin color, many Black authors focused upon that visual difference and questioned whether such easy categories existed. What happened when a Black American who possessed light skin merged, often secretly, into white culture? The so-called color line between races, viewed by some as glaringly firm and obvious, often shifted in unexpected directions and, in a few cases, disappeared altogether from the perspectives of both Black and White Americans.

This heightened emphasis upon outward physical characteristics inevitably created a tension in the visual culture of the early twentieth century. More directly, articles from Black newspapers, such as The Chicago Defender, tried to knowingly orchestrate the creation of the new Black identity in relation to the existing White culture. Contradictions, however, abounded within the pages of such newspapers when advertisements for 'skin lighteners' appeared beside articles promoting Black history and heritage. Visual representations of many aspects of this cultural negotiation of identity, which tended to be far more confrontational than even the most impassioned text, can be found in the illustrations, editorial cartoons, and comics of Black newspapers. The way Black Americans literally viewed themselves at the beginning of the twentieth century, how they interpreted and defined their own cultural identity, evolved from their own experimentation of portrayals in published texts, both in literature and newspapers.

Session B

4:00-5:30 p.m. (Frisco)

5. A Tangled Mess of Funk: The Implications of James Brown's Hair/Style and Performed African American Masculinity by Casey Wasserman, Duke University

 

Abstract

Despite the attention given to James Brown's ubiquitous disheveled mug shots of years past and the inordinate consideration bestowed upon his hairstyles and fashion sense, his masculinity has never been questioned. How is it that Little Richard's sexuality is clearly marked as problematic yet Brown's sexual identity remains untarnished if not thrust into the realm of the hypermasculine? Be it processed, natural, long, or short, Brown's hair is aligned with his music as well as the commodification of his persona and a sense of the extraordinary. Hours of styling and makeup application are required to produce a specific image or to use Brown's words, "someone you would pay to see." Here is a man fully in control over his image and masculinity: a self-styled "Sex Machine."

Yet for all his styling and posturing, Brown is but a caricature of his former self as Valerie Boyd suggests: "Those of us who are enlightened (or enblackened) beyond the point of straightening our hair worry about the edges of our collective hair, too. We are shamed by James Brown's aesthetic; we wish the brother would get a haircut." But how exactly does one shed the often satirized hypersexual imagining of a specific style that has cemented this particular artist's place in the pantheon of popular culture while simultaneously embodying something of a distinctly African American aesthetic? In what ways is Brown's hair both raced and gendered?

6. The Corporeal Archive: Black Female Bodies Articulation of Collectivity and Dissonance by Kyessa LeFaye Moors, Princeton University

 

Abstract

Judgments are rendered daily about what Michelle Obama, as our first African American (or Black) First Lady, does with her body. There is a preoccupation with what she represents as an agential body and the vehicle, or "vestibular" space Hortense Spillers invokes, through which American Womanhood is conveyed to the world. Thus, never has a discussion of the Black female form as constructed in the Western cultural imaginary seemed more necessary or influential in its implications. To that end, this paper will put into dialogue and critically engage the performative aspects of two texts: the novel Jazz, by Toni Morrison, and the film The Good Shepherd, by Robert De Niro.

In the course of my discussion, I will use the notion of 'the Archive' as a prism through which to refract questions of how the Black female body is used as an ideological heuristic and 'filing' technique. I would also like to interrogate how their corporeal presences are shaped when the visual and auditory are compromised by the mediating influence of language or recording technology? In other words, as archival projects themselves, I want to know how the novel and film imagine the construction of the Black female body and to what uses is that construction put? I believe that in both texts, a Black female presence operates as a means to an end, a marker of temporality, a way of navigating political or emotional terrain(s), a two-way mirror, a marker of geographical instability, or as an indicator of a truth situated on an infinity symbol--a constant return to and escape from.

7. Douglass and "Box" Brown: Learning the Literacy of Self-Authorization by Gretchen Tressler, Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis

 

Abstract

Not Available

8. The Body as a Border-Crossing Voice of an Asian American Identity: Sexuality in the Writing of Early Japanese Immigrants by Ina Christiane Seethaler, Saint Louis University

 

Abstract

The American Diary of a Japanese Girl (1902) is considered to be the first novel by a writer of Japanese origin living in the U.S. Recounting the picaresque story of his heroine's exploration of American society, Yone Noguchi refutes contemporary notions of a romanticized and infantile Japan. In my discussion of The American Diary, I will focus on how images of the body support the novel's complex intersections of race, gender, and nationality and on how the immigrant body shapes the emergence of an early Asian American identity.

I argue that the development of such an identity in The Diary is supported by the protagonist's fight against gender ideologies and by episodes of gender and class cross-dressing as well as homosexual tendencies, which function as an emblem for the insecurities that Asian immigrants experienced when trying to become a part of U.S. society. These episodes show that for the protagonist the realms of ethnic, gender, and class identity have borders that can and should be crossed. Indeed, many Asian immigrants used their body for various forms of masking, role-playing, and performance regarding their sexuality to resist appropriation and subjection.

As a male author's imitation of a female voice, The American Diary itself is the product of role-playing and identity-replication. Hence I claim that in addition to the instances of cross-dressing and homosexual feelings depicted in the novel, Noguchi also engages in authorial cross-dressing when he uses the form of the diary and disguises his male body and voice, which helps him accommodate the hybrid characteristics of Asian American identity.

89. German Literature and Culture I

Session B

2:15-3:45 p.m. (Missouri Pacific)

(See Session # 79 - 10:15 a.m., Saturday)

90. Italian

2:15-5:30 p.m. (Wabash Cannonball)

Topic: Italian Experiences of Reality's Representation Between Literature and Cinema

Chair: Simone Dubrovic, Kenyon College

Secretary: Stefano Boselli, Gettysburg College

Session A

2:15-3:45 p.m. (Wabash Cannonball)

1. The Peripeties of Francesca da Rimini: D'Annuzio and Masnata from Decadentism to Futurism by Stefano Boselli, Gettysburg College

 

Abstract

Since her inclusion in Dante's Inferno, Francesca da Rimini has inspired numerous artistic explorations in many languages. The same story, however, has become the playground for completely different points of view. While Gabriele D'Annunzio looks back at medieval sources and develops the conventional dramaturgical structure by refining the use of words, Pino Masnata purposefully employs the same events to experiment with synthetic and cinematic structures.

2. Neorealismo e Decadentismo nella narrativa e nel cinema di Pier Paolo Pasolini by Daniele Fioretti, University of Wisconsin-Madison

 

Abstract

Not Available

3. Il Trionfo della morte: la collaborazione tra Gabriele d'Annunzio e il pittore Francesco Paolo Michetti by Lodovica Guidarelli, Colby College

 

Abstract

D'Annunzio's novel Trionfo della morte is particularly relevant to a discussion on the relationship between its author and the painter Francesco Paolo Michetti. The Trionfo, in fact, was partially written at Michetti's residence, the Convento di Santa Maria Maggiore at Francavilla. The novel's dedication to Michetti refers to the intellectual proximity of the two abruzzese artists. Most significantly, d'Annunzio had originally planned to accompany the Trionfo with a graphic comment by Michetti; a plan which led the two friends to repeatedly visit the Madonna dei Miracoli church, at Casalbordino. Although the plan remained unfulfilled, d'Annunzio and Michetti respectively worked on literary and artistic representations of the crowd of pilgrims of Casalbordino, which they had studied together dal vero. Through a study of both representations, this paper aims at investigating the vital artistic collaboration between d'Annunzio and Michetti.

4. The Science of (Con)Science and the Tomorrow of Moral Poets and Mammoth Unrest by Travis Landry, Kenyon College

 

Abstract

The association of Charles Darwin's evolutionism with an indifferent, deterministic Nature begs revision, given that conscience in The Descent of Man (1871) originates from both moral sense and the will. If evolution, which is temporal, leaves us with one thing, it is the (con)science that being is becoming. Because we will even toward tragedy, our intuition makes plain like that no self is given. Yet with L'era nuova, after modern man has lost himself in science, or rather in the illusion of Real knowledge, Giovanni Pascoli recognizes the need for a return to conscience, to the moral voice of poetic truth; while Italo Svevo, for his part, reminds us with a Darwinian tale how we, though imperfect, emancipated ourselves from our mammoth protectors through action, born from existential unrest.

Session B

4:00-5:30 p.m. (Wabash Cannonball)

5. Le notti bianche tra cinema e letteratura: Luchino Visconti vs. Fedor Dostoevskij by Chiara De Santi, University of Wisconsin-Madison

 

Abstract

Not Available

6. On Visconti and literature: Vaghe Stelle dellOrsa, Gruppo di famiglia in un interno and L'Innocente by Simone Dubrovic, Kenyon College

 

Abstract

This paper will offer some remarks on three of Visconti's movies, where the fascination toward literature comes up in an interesting way and sheds a curious light on Visconti's ideology, his relationship with literary texts and, ultimately, his view of cinema as a frustrating deception, when used to tackle the invisible threads of reality.

7. The Mirror and the Veil: Senso by Camillo Boito and Luchino Visconti by Ernesto Livorni, University of Wisconsin-Madison

 

Abstract

The paper focuses on the novella by Boito and the cinematic version given by Visconti, keeping in mind the different historical periods in which the two works were elaborated, besides the different art media. In particular, the paper discusses Visconti's expansion of the metaphorical use of mirror and veil as objects as well as metaphors that assume a symbolic function in the comments on the history of Risorgimento and the unification of Italy that the works in quite different fashions make.

8. Emanuele Crialese's Respiro in the Light of Neorealism by Fulvio Orsitto, California State University-Chico

 

Abstract

Emanuele Crialese's film presents us with a nuanced and complicated portrait of a woman, Grazia, who challenges all southern stereotypes about mothers and wives. Nonetheless, the director assembles this modern rendition of a black sheep's struggle with her community, drawing from a mosaic of classic citations, ranging from French Poetic Realism to Italian Neorealism. This paper will focus on the influence of Visconti's The Earth Trembles (1948), Rossellini's Stromboli (1950) and Antonioni's The Adventure (1960) on Crialese's film, reflecting upon the influence, the evolution and the repositioning of the Neorealist framework within Italian Contemporary Cinema.

91. Luso-Brazilian - Crossing Borders: Gender, Class, Race, and Nationality

2:15-5:30 p.m. (Zephyr Rocket)

Topic: Representing and Performing Gendered Bodies

Chair: Saulo Gouveia, Michigan State University

Secretary: Carolina Castellanos, Vanderbilt University

Session A

2:15-3:45 p.m. (Zephyr Rocket)

1. Food Fights: Latin American Intertextuality in Gabriela, Cravo e canela and Cien años de soledad by Chris Schulenburg, University of Wisconsin-Platteville

 

Abstract

2. Identidade nacional e natureza humana: O corpo feminino na arte de Emiliano Di Cavalcanti by Patricia Reinheimer, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (Brazil)

 

Abstract

3. A Physically Powerful Woman: Luzia-homem by Domingos Olímpio by Carolina Castellanos, Vanderbilt University

 

Abstract

4. Lost in the Matrix: Brazilian Masculinity in Carandiru by Lorrie Palmer, Indiana University

 

Abstract

5. Language Games and (Contra)dictions in Clarice Lispector's The chicken and the egg by Olimpia E. Rosenthal, University of Arizona

 

Abstract

Session B

4:00-5:30 p.m. (Zephyr Rocket)

Topic: Negotiating the Literary Authority: Challenges, Continuities & Manipulations

Chair: Carolina Castellanos, Vanderbilt University

Secretary: Saulo Gouveia, Michigan State University

6. Cartas Apologéticas that Cracked the Espelho Crítico: Gertrudes Margarida de Jesus and Enlightenment Proto-Feminism in Portugal by Zak K. Montgomery, Wartburg College

 

Abstract

7. Literate woman of 19th century in Brazil: Investigating the implied readership by Selma Vital, Washington University in Saint Louis

 

Abstract

8. The Early Modernist Manifestos of Mário de Andrade: Power, Authority and the Inscription of the Avant-Garde within the Boundaries of Bourgeois Art by Saulo Gouveia, Michigan State University

 

Abstract

9. Endanger the Nation: Afro-Brazilian Literature Questioning Racial Aesthetic by Marissel Hernández-Romero, The Graduate Center-CUNY

 

Abstract

10. Illogical Memory: The Transgression of Traditional Memory Discourses about the Military Dictatorship in Beatriz Bracher's Não falei by Andrew Rajca, University of Arizona

 

Abstract

92. Teaching Writing in College

Session B

2:15-3:45 p.m. (Burlington Route)

(see Session # 82 - 10:15 a.m., Saturday)

Special Sessions

93. Afro-Caribbean Identity: Space, Culture, and Literature

2:15-3:45 p.m. (Jeffersonian)

Chair: Mamadou Badiane, University of Missouri-Columbia

1. The Representation of Women in the poetry Léopold Sédar Senghor, Luis Palés Matos, and Zacarías Tallet by Mamadou Badiane, University of Missouri-Columbia

 

Abstract

2. From Caliban's Women to Dancehall Queens: Representations of Women in Caribbean Literary and Cultural Discourse by Sheri-Marie Harrison, University of Missouri-Columbia

 

Abstract

3. The female image in the poetry of Nicolás Guillén by Wendy McBurney, University of Missouri-Columbia

 

Abstract

4. Eugenio Hernandez Espinosa's La balsa: An Allegory of Decomposition and Death of The Cuban Revolution by Ana Isabel Zapata Calle, University of Missouri-Columbia

94. American Cultural Studies

2:15-5:30 p.m. (Dixie Flyer)

Chair: Elizabeth Klaver , Southern Illinois University-Carbondale

Session A

2:15-3:45 p.m. (Dixie Flyer)

1. Supermarket Sociology by David J. Alworth, University of Chicago

 

Abstract

2. Revisiting the Supermarket in Don DeLillo's White Noise by Belinda Wheeler, Southern Illinois University

 

Abstract

3. What Happened to Danny Tanner? The Cultural Implications of changes in the Family Sitcom Formula by Samantha Day, Western Kentucky University

Session B

4:00-5:30 p.m. (Dixie Flyer)

4. From Legend to Medicine: The Giant as Sign of Excess and Lack by Paul Huggins, Southern Illinois University-Carbondale

 

Abstract

5. Class Migration through Performance: American Idol and Slings & Arrows by Elizabeth Toohey, Principia College

 

Abstract

6. Hybridized Identity in two Accented Films: The Joy Luck Club and The Namesake by Laura Aliberti, Chapman University

 

Abstract

7. She acted long a woman's noble part: Memorializing Margaret Fuller in the context of the Nineteenth Century European Sketchbook by Kristina Marie Darling, University of Missouri-St. Louis

 

Abstract

95. Civil War: American Vortex in Print

Session C: Reconstruction & Imperial Desire

2:15-3:45 p.m. (New York Central)

(see Session # 70 - 8:30 a.m., Saturday)

96. Death, Sleep and Power: Migration Beyond Physical Borders in the German Speaking Context

2:15-3:45 p.m. (Meteor)

Chair: Katarzyna Kowalczyk, University of Illinois at Chicago and Ervin Malakaj, Washington University

1. Journey to the End of the Night: Thomas Mann's Der Tod in Venedig and Die Betrogene by Kristina Förster, University of Illinois at Chicago

 

Abstract

2. Animal Trespassing: Borderless Creatures in Emine Zevgi Özdamar's Der Hof im Spiegel by Vera Pollina, University of Illinois at Chicago

 

Abstract

3. The Power of Personality: Examining the Multiplicity of the Margarete Character in Goethe's Faust I by Elizabeth Kauder, University of Illinois at Chicago

 

Abstract

97. Migrations and the Other in 18th-19th Century English Literature

2:15-3:45 p.m. (Knickerbocker)

1. Enlightened Effendis and Fanatic Females: Mary Wortley Montagu's Turkish Balancing Act by Anna Stenson, The University of Iowa

 

Abstract

2. Nature and Art: Connecting with the Foreign by Kelly Rynearson, University of Indianapolis

 

Abstract

3. Whitewashing Blackface Minstrelsy in Nineteenth-Century England: Female Banjo Players in Punch by Laura Vorachek, University of Dayton

 

Abstract

4. Howells' Foregone Conclusion: Don Ippolito as Catholic Cautionary Tale by Jess Bowers, University of Missouri-Columbia

 

Abstract

Associated Organizations

98. Women's Caucus for the Modern Languages/Midwest I

2:15-3:45 p.m. (Midnight Special)

Topic: Building Bridges, Being Bridges: Is Our Women's Studies Teaching Still Truly Interdisciplinary?

Chair: Linda Coleman, Eastern Illinois University

1. From the Three R's to the Three C's—Create, Critique, Contextualize by Milton W. Wendland, The University of Kansas, Lawrence

 

Abstract

2. Dissoi Logoi: Sex, Spirit, and Social Movements in a Feminist Writing Class by T. J. Geiger II, Syracuse University

 

Abstract

3. Interdisciplinarity, Migration, and the Introduction to Women's Studies Course by Voichita Nachescu, Grand Valley State

 

Abstract

Workshops

99. Preparing for MLA Interviews

2:15-5:30 p.m. (Illinois Central)

Chair: Craig Dionne, Eastern Michigan University

Session A

2:15-3:45 p.m. (Illinois Central)

1. Cover Letters, CVs, and Noting the Job Ads by Jill Kirsten Anderson, Southern Illinois University Edwardsville

 

Abstract

2. Waiting it out at the MLA: The Importance of Not Being a Nervous Wreck by Hillary Nunn, University of Akron

 

Abstract

3. Which of you…doth love us most? The MLA Interview by Craig Dionne, Eastern Michigan University

 

Abstract

Session B

4:00-5:30 p.m. (Illinois Central)

4. Navigating the Foreign Language Department Interview by William White, Buffalo State College

 

Abstract

5. The Importance of Being Earnest [i.e. Yourself] by Eileen Joy, Southern Illinois University Edwardsville

 

Abstract

Permanent Sections

100. Fabricating the Body

Session B

4:00-5:30 p.m. (Frisco)

(see Session # 88 - 2:15 p.m., Saturday)

101. German Literature and Culture II

4:00-5:30 p.m. (Missouri Pacific)

Topic: German-Language Poetry

Chair: Jefford Vahlbusch, University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire

Secretary: Geoffrey C. Howes, Bowling Green State University

1. Heine, Dialectics, and Historical Progress: Deutschland, ein Wintermärchen by K. Scott Baker, University of Missouri-Kansas City

 

Abstract

2. A Silent Conversation: The Poetic Dialogue of Else Lasker-Schuler, Gertrud Kolmar, and Nelly Sachs by Carola Daffner, Southern Illinois University-Carbondale

 

Abstract

3. Challenging Dialogues in Marcel Beyer's Erdkunde by Hannelore Mundt, University of Wyoming

 

Abstract

102. Italian

Session B

4:00-5:30 p.m. (Wabash Cannonball)

(see Session # 90 - 2:15 p.m., Saturday)

103. Luso-Brazilian - Crossing Borders: Gender, Class, Race and Nationality

Session B

4:00-5:30 p.m. (Zephyr Rocket)

(see Session # 91 - 2:15 p.m., Saturday)

104. Young Adult Literature

4:00-5:30 p.m. (Meteor)

Topic: Re-Visions of Creation Myths in Young Adult Literature

Chair: Ryan Kerr, Elgin Community College

Secretary: Jennifer Goodhue, Elgin Community College

1. Like an Angel, Fallen: The Incorporation of Enochic Creation Mythology into Cassandra Clare's Mortal Instruments Trilogy by Jessica L.T. deVega, Morningside College

 

Abstract

2. The Father, Son, and the Holy Clone: Re-vision of Biblical Genesis in The House of the Scorpion by Ryan Kerr, Elgin Community College

 

Abstract

Special Sessions

105. American Cultural Studies

Session B

4:00-5:30 p.m. (Dixie Flyer)

(see Session # 94- 2:15 p.m., Saturday)

106. Civil War: American Vortex in Print

Session D: Long Remember

4:00-5:30 p.m. (New York Central)

(see Session # 70 - 8:30 a.m., Saturday)

107. Gender Migrations

4:00-5:30 p.m. (Midnight Special)

1. Accidentally on Purpose: The Migration of Molly Bloom by Jennifer Holland, Portland State University

 

Abstract

2. The Case of the Californio: Effeminacy, Illness, and Cultural Confusion in Helen Hunt Jankson's Ramona (1884) by Niya Bond, The University of Missouri - Columbia

 

Abstract

3. Self Revision in Frances Trollope's Domestic Manners of the Americans by Emily Blaser, Marquette University

 

Abstract

108. The Globalized City: Topics on Migration and Politics in the German-Speaking Context

4:00-5:30 p.m. (Burlington Route)

Chair: Natalia Dudnik, University of Illinois at Chicago and Ekaterina Pirozhenko, University of Illinois at Chicago

1. Women of Courage: Defiance & Subversion in Late Nineteenth-Century Berlin by Anja Shepela, University of Minnesota

 

Abstract

2. Challenging Patriarchy: Femininity, Nationality, and Travel in Shirins Hochzeit by Ervin Malakaj, Washington University in St. Louis

 

Abstract

3. The city Sendomir as allegory of 'foreignness' in the novella Das Kloster bei Sendomir by Katarzyna Kowalczyk, University of Illinois at Chicago

 

Abstract

109. H.G. Wells, Modernism, and Modernity

4:00-5:30 p.m. (Knickerbocker)

Chair: Kevin Swafford, Bradley University

1. The Poetry of Commerce: Tono Bungay and a Contemporary Understanding of Value by Stephanie Cherolis, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign

 

Abstract

2. Taste and Performance: Class and Everyday Aesthetics in H.G. Wells' Kipps (1905) by Kevin Swafford, Bradley University

 

Abstract

110. Pre-Shakespearean and Shakespearean Migrations

4:00-5:30 p.m. (Jeffersonian)

1. Redefining Drengskapr: Harboring a Fugitive in Gilsi's Saga by Kevin Drzakowski, University of Wisconsin-Stout

 

Abstract

2. Cleopatra: the Meaining of Indian SATI by Kakali Adhikary, NARA Women’s University, Japan

 

Abstract

3. Falstaff on the Move: Character Shifts in Shakespeare's Second Tetralogy by Alexandra Block, Bucknell University

 

Abstract

4. Go bring the rabble […] here to this place: Reconstructing Prospero's Island for Travelers, or the Business of Original Practices by Ann Pleiss Morris, University of Iowa

 

Abstract

Workshops

111. Preparing for MLA Interviews

Session B

4:00-5:30 p.m. (Illinois Central)

(see Session # 99 - 2:15 p.m., Saturday)

Social Events

112. Member’s Reception

5:30-6:30 p.m. (Regency C Ballroom)

Complimentary wine and hors d’oeuvres, cash bar

113. Staging of Harold Pinter’s Sketches

Sponsored by The International Harold Pinter Society and Steinsemble Performance Group

6:30-8:00 p.m. (Regency B Ballroom)

Steinsemble Performance Group, a company devoted to the recovery and performance of underrepresented modernist and absurdist pieces, presents an evening of short works by Harold Pinter. These works represent Pinter at his most concise and most suggestive. These productions are underwritten by the International Harold Pinter Society.

114. Open Mic

8:15-9:30 p.m. (Regency B Ballroom)

Readers can email the M/MLA up to a week before the convention (mmla@luc.edu) or show up at the reading to sign up.

115. Film Screening - Moved to Session 62, Friday, 8:15 p.m.