2009 M/MLA Annual Convention

November 12-15, St. Louis, Missouri

Schedule & Abstracts

Sunday, November 15, 2009

8:00 a.m. - 11:45 a.m. Refreshments (Regency C Ballroom)

You are invited to attend the Book Exhibit, 8:00 a.m.-12:00 noon (Regency C Ballroom)

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Permanent Sections

116. Art What Thou Eat: Food in Literature, Art, and Culture: Session C - Moved to Session 87.1, Saturday, 2:15 p.m.

117. Modern Literature

8:30-10:00 a.m. (Dixie Flyer)

Topic: The Roots & Reach of African Influence

Chair: Michael Meinhardt, Loyola University Chicago

1. The Books of Daniel: A Reflection on (African) Authorship by Jonathan Pitts, Ohio Northern University

 

Abstract

This paper discusses the unpublished fiction of the brilliant refugee Rwandan scholar and novelist, Daniel Kanyandekwe, who died in 1997 in Florida before he could publish his work. The paper discusses Daniel’s fiction as performance--formal, aesthetic, experiential, and political—in the context of the editorial concerns and the difficulties I encountered as the editor of one of his novels, The Buttocks of the Almighty. As his editor it was my task to ask Daniel to develop his own identity as an African novelist within the constraints of the publishing business. Among the editorial concerns were style, story, and theme. Daniel’s natural style (he wrote in English) was flowing, complex, melancholy, and wildly imaginative, qualities I believed reflected well the nature of his story and his own experience as a Rwandan refugee and African writer. I also believed he needed to learn to control his style in order to make it his own. Like his style, his sense of story was, at its best, expansive in its humanity, and, at its weakest, simply incoherent. And yet it was these very qualities that I believed would make his career as a novelist, that would work together so powerfully with the traditional existentialism of his themes: the philosophical and political absurdity of contemporary life, the suffering of Africans under corrupt regimes, the power of African humor and compassion to save us all. A decade after his death, his work remains unpublished except in excerpts. This paper will reflect on the possibilities for future publication of his work.

2. Exile & Ecstasy: Marechera's Dualistic Dowry by Michael Meinhardt, Loyola University Chicago

 

Abstract

3. Bodies as Language in J.M. Coetzee's Waiting for the Barbarians by Jacob Lauritzen, University of Akron

 

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118. Peace Literature and Pedagogy

8:30-10:00 a.m. (Missouri Pacific)

Topic: Women's Writing of Human Rights and Reform

Chair: Kelli Lyon Johnson, Miami University Hamilton

1. The Promises and Dangers of Sentiment: Affective Representation and Persuasion in Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl Written by Herself by Julia Bninski, Loyola University Chicago

 

Abstract

2. Gender, Genre, and Nineteenth-Century American Women's Social Reform Fiction by Whitney Womack-Smith, Miami University Hamilton

 

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3. Angelina Jolie and Alek Wek as Autobiographical Activists by Theresa Kulbaga, Miami University Hamilton

 

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4. Saving the World: The Transformation of Contemporary Ethnic Women's Fiction by Kelli Lyon Johnson, Miami University Hamilton

 

Abstract

119. Spanish Cultural Studies

8:30-10:00 a.m. (Frisco)

Topic: Open

Chair: Malcolm Alan Compitello, University of Arizona

1. Que hable la calle: Artistic Interventions in Barcelona by Stephen Vilaseca, Northern Illinois University

 

Abstract

2. Polifonía militante en Hay motivo: silencio y otredad en el microcosmos urbano by Juliana Luna Freire, University of Arizona

 

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3. Rafael Chirbes's Cartographic Imaginary by Malcolm Alan Compitello, University of Arizona

 

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4. Re-envisioning patriarchy in Iciar Bollain's Te doy mis ojos by Jaime Wilson, University of Arizona

 

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120. Spanish III: Latin American Literature

Session B

8:30-10:00 a.m. (Jeffersonian)

(see Session # 69 - 8:30 a.m., Saturday)

Special Sessions

121. Contemporary Migrations

8:30-10:00 a.m. (Zephyr Rocket)

1. Frontier Men and their Gunwork: Homosocial Relationships in Contemporary Hollywood Westerns by Mark Heimermann, Saint Cloud State University

 

Abstract

2. Migration and Undecidability in Salman Rushdie's Satanic Verses by Jesse Wolfe, California State University

 

Abstract

3. The Third and Final Continent: Lahiri's Colonial Outer Space by Keith A. Russell II, Lindenwood University

 

Abstract

4. Migrant Metaphors and Hybrid Identities in Salman Rushdie's Satanic Verses by Hena Ahmad

 

Abstract

122. Familiarity and Foreignness in Literatures of the Diaspora

8:30-10:00 a.m. (Jeffersonian)

Chair: Shushan Avagyan, Illinois State University

1. The Concept of the Foreign in Armenian American Writer Micheline Aharonian Marcom's Fiction by Shushan Avagyan, Illinois State University

 

Abstract

2. Intersections of the Personal and the Political in the Lives of the Women of Sri Lankan Diaspora in Ganeshanthan's Love Marriage by Krishna Manavalli, Illinois State University

 

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3. Expressing Arabic and Representing French in Assia Djebar's Fantasia: An Algerian Cavalcade by Noah Roderick, Illinois State University

 

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4. Contrasting Francophone and Anglophone Representations of Africa in the Writings of the Diaspora by Moussa Traoré, Illinois State University

 

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123. Hapless Hop-a-longs/Seltsame Springinsfelden: Transience in Early Modern Germany

8:30-10:00 a.m. (Illinois Central)

Chair: Patrick Brugh and Gerhild Williams, Washington University in St. Louis

1. Monstrous Melusine: Defining Monster in Thuring von Ringoltingen's Melusine by Patrick Brugh, Washington University in St. Louis

 

Abstract

2. Travel and Christian Reuter's Schelmuffsky: Wahrhaftige, kuriose und sehr gefährlich Reisebeschreibung by Debra Prager, Washington and Lee University

 

Abstract

3. vnnd trib mit jm alle Vnzucht: Transgressive Sexuality and Queer Desire in Historia von D. Johann Fausten by Norma Suvak, Washington University in St. Louis

 

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124. Imagining Frontiers: Identity and Movement in Early American Literature

8:30-10:00 a.m. (Wabash Cannonball)

Chair: Sean Kelly, Wilkes University

1. To Knit a Pair of Stockins: Rowlandson's Captivity Narrative, Gender, and Colonial Identity by Clayton Zuba, University of Houston

 

Abstract

2. Reviving New England as a Means to Faith: Thomas Shepard's Confessions as a Communal Response to the Crisis of America by Andrea Knutson, Oakland University

 

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3. Cultural and Identity Migrations from Tory to Rebel in Catherine Maria Sedgwick's The Linwoods; or Sixty Years Since... by Kavita S. Hatwalkar, University of New Orleans

 

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4. Removal and Rescue: Native American Migration in the Poetics of William Cullen Bryant and Lydia Maria Sigourney by Walter Bosse, University of Cincinnati

 

Abstract

125. The Journeys They Made: 19th Century Women Who Crossed Boundaries

8:30-10:00 a.m. (Meteor)

Chair: Caresse John, Belmont University

1. Very full of Matter: Jane Austen's Travel Letters by Leah Kind, Northern Illinois University

 

Abstract

2. Elizabeth Gaskell's Travels Abroad and Homebound Duties by Christine Brovelli O'Brien, Northern Illinois University

 

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3. Sarah Orne Jewett: Crossing Narrative Boundaries by Caresse John, Belmont University

 

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126. Political Fictions - Moved to Session 56.1, Friday, 4:00 p.m.

Workshops

127. Writing a Grant Proposal

8:30-10:00 a.m. (New York Central)

Moderator: Geraldine Murphy, City College, CUNY 

1. Jessica DeSpain, University of Iowa T. Anne Cleary International Dissertation Fellow and Frederick F. Seely Distinguished Dissertation Fellow, Southern Illinois University-Edwardsville Summer Research Fellow

 

2. Susanna Ashton, American Printing History Association Fellow, McNeil Center for Early American Studies Research Associate, Fulbright Faculty Scholar in Ireland, Woodruff Library Research Fellow in African American Studies at Emory Univ., Twain Scholar-in-Residence at Quarry Farm, Hibernian Research Fellow at Notre Dame’s Cushwa Center, William Dean Howells Memorial Fellow in American Literature at Harvard’s Houghton Library 

3. Kathleen Diffley, AAUW Dissertation Fellow, Howard Foundation Fellow, NEH Fellow 

Permanent Sections

128. English I: English Literature Before 1800

10:15-11:45 a.m. (Zephyr Rocket)

Topic: Postcolonial Perspectives

Chair: Angela Rehbein, University of Missouri

Secretary: Caitlin Kelly, University of Missouri

1. The Natives Went Norman: The Colonizer and the Colonized in Medieval Histories of Britain by William Christopher Brown, Indiana University-Bloomington

 

Abstract

2. The Economy of Race in Jonson's The Staple of News by Denys Van Renen, University of Illinois

 

Abstract

3. Before Orientalism: In Search of Smithson's Tabasheer; The Multicultural Network of the Eighteenth Century by Beyazit H. Akman, Illinois State University

 

Abstract

129. International Francophone Studies

10:15-11:45 a.m. (Jeffersonian)

Topic: Memory, Identify and Politics in World Literature in French

Chair: Brigette Hamon-Porter, Hope College

Secretary: Hélène Brown, Principia College

1. Desordres identitaires dans les romans de Gisèle Pineau by Véronique Maisier, Southern Illinois University

 

Abstract

2. Bug-Jargal and Victor Hugo's Linguistic Commentary on Haitian Creole by Heather L. Turo, University of Boulder-Colorado

 

Abstract

3. Dire le vrai dans la littérature émergente de Nouvell-Calédonie by Brigette Hamon-Porter, Hope College

 

Abstract

4. Nazi Boni et Mongo Beti aux antipodes de l'histoire: Crepuscule des temps anciens et Perpétue et l'habitude du malheur by Christian Dogbe, North Park University

 

Abstract

130. Literary Criticism

10:15-11:45 a.m. (Midnight Special)

Topic: Migration in Context

Chair: Sarah Zurhellen, University of Missouri - Columbia

Secretary: John Conley, University of Minnesota

1. Nobody's Home: Migrant Labor and Literary Form in Bret Easton Ellis's Less Than Zero by John Conley, University of Minnesota

 

Abstract

2. Transnational Storytelling: Collaboration and Hybridity in What is the What by Jo Luloff, University of Missouri - Columbia

 

Abstract

3. Managing Movement: Alternatives to Risk Management in Don Delillo and William Gibson by Sarah Zurhellen, University of Missouri - Columbia

 

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131. Native American Literature

10:15-11:45 a.m. (Dixie Flyer)

Topic: Off the Rez and into the Cities: Migration Stories

Chair: Janet LaBrie, Universtiy of Wisconsin-Waukesha

Secretary: Margaret Rozga, University of Wisconsin-Waukesha

1. The Hybrid Nomad: Displacement, Community, and Self in Thomas J. Canter's Indian Giver by Samantha Extance, University of Tulsa

 

Abstract

2. I'm at the Reservation of my Mind: Lyric Border Crossings of Adrian Louis and Sherman Alexie by Glenn Freeman, Cornell College

 

Abstract

3. Sometimes Finding One's Real Tribe Means Leaving One's Reservation Tribe: Sherman Alexie's Characters Just Can't Go Home Again by Janet LaBrie, Universtiy of Wisconsin-Waukesha

 

Abstract

132. Spanish III: Latin American Literature

Session C

10:15-11:45 a.m. (Jeffersonian)

(see Session # 69 - 8:30 a.m., Saturday)

Special Sessions

133. Making 'Poetry…confident about its own durability': Helping Students Discover Contemporary Poetry in Online Classes

10:15-11:45 a.m. (Wabash Cannonball)

Chair: James Ottery, University of Illinois at Springfield

Discussant: Sara Cordell, University of Illinois at Springfield

1. Making it Accessible: Teaching Poetry to a Diverse Student Population Online by James Ottery, University of Illinois at Springfield

 

Abstract

This presentation will outline the development of this particular contemporary poetry course and its online interactive written and verbal elements, as well as the creation of the "group presentation" concept.

2. Online Teacher to Online Student to Online Teacher (Student?) Again: The Graduate Poetry Seminar I Took Last Spring by Cynthia Greene, University of Illinois at Springfield

 

Abstract

Cynthia Greene, a graduate student and adjunct writing teacher at UIS, will discuss her experience as an online instructor and student who found herself acting as both in this contemporary poetry course. Working with both English and non-English majors online helped her create a positive and encourageing environment with all students working together that offered confidence and support to the non-English majors that helped them all flourish.

3. An Analysis of Group Work in Online Classes: Helping Undergraduates Find Different Ways to Think About Poetry by Julie Perino, University of Illinois at Springfield

 

Abstract

Julie Perino is an English graduate student at UIS. Her presentation covers her learning experience as a student learning about poetry while gaining first-time teaching experience. She will explain how serving in the latter role helped the students in her group do more in-depth analysis of the poetry they were reading and presenting, often creating interpretations that were surprising to them and to her - providing an experience where, she believes, everyone was obviously learning more than they could by working on the poetry individually.

134. Migraciones decimonónicas. España y Latinoamérica en el Siglo XIX

10:15-11:45 a.m. (Meteor)

Chair: Marcela E. Brusa, Loyola University Chicago

1. The Fresh Blood of the Nation: The Emigrant as Commodity in the Works of Ramiro de Maeztu and Rafael de Altamira by Diana Arbaiza, University of Virginia

 

Abstract

2. Migraciones ideológicas y de género en La Quena de Juana Manuela Gorriti by Marcela E. Brusa, Loyola University Chicago

 

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3. Cuando salí de La Habana…La habanera de costa a costa by Mónica Fuertes-Arboix, Coe College

 

Abstract

4. Ekphrasis as Escape: The Ideological Value of the Visual in Benito Pérez Galdós by Alrick C. Knight, Loyola University Chicago

 

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135. Revising "The Good War": Reexamining Major Works and Mainstream Narratives of World War II

10:15-11:45 a.m. (Missouri Pacific)

Chair: Vincent Casaregola, St. Louis University

1. Audacity, Animal Instinct, and Angst: The Thin Red Line and The Naked and the Dead as Modern Hybrid War Novels by Ina Christiane Seethaler, Saint Louis University

 

Abstract

2. The World Wars and the Madness of Race in America by Kyle Crews, Saint Louis University

 

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3. The Rubber Boat Affair: The Backstory of Norman Mailer's The Naked and the Dead by Robert Blaskiewicz, Georgia Institute of Technology

 

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4. Revising G.I. Joe: WW II Veterans' Trauma Memoirs and the Neo-World War II Film by Vincent Casaregola, Saint Louis University

 

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136. Teaching Difficult Texts

10:15-11:45 a.m. (Knickerbocker)

Chair: Marjorie Worthington, Eastern Illinois University

1. Approaches to Teaching Tiempo de silencio by McKew Devitt, University of Vermont

 

Abstract

2. Positive Rejection: Teaching the Work of Kathy Acker by Marjorie Worthington, Eastern Illinois University

 

Abstract

3. Bringing the Beach Read to the Ivory Tower: Bridging the Genre/Literary by Alison Umminger, University of West Georgia

 

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4. Optic Whiteness: Whiteouts and Blackouts in Percival Everett's Erasure by Tim Engles, Eastern Illinois University

 

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137. War and Migration

10:15-11:45 a.m. (Frisco)

1. One arrives nowhere: Elizabeth Bowen's Wartime Migrations by Anna Teekell, Washington University in St. Louis

 

Abstract

2. Mobilizing Domesticity: Autoethnography and Empire in Soldiers' Letters by James Berkey, Indiana University

 

Abstract

3. Violet Kazue de Cristoforo's Poetic Indignation at Tule Lake by Yi-ling Lin, University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign

 

Abstract