2010 M/MLA Annual Convention

November 4-7, Chicago, Illinois

Friday, November 5, 2010

Open All Close All8:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. Refreshments

You are invited to attend the Book Exhibit, 8:00 a.m.-7:30 p.m.

Permanent Sections

3. Young Adult Literature

8:30-10:00 a.m. (Meeting Suite 1)

Topic: Terror in Young Adult Literature
Chair: Jennifer L. Goodhue, Independent Scholar

1. "Graphic" Depictions: Young Adults Read and Write Terror Via Comics and Graphic Novels
Lisa Beckelhimer, University of Cincinnati

2. The More Ethical "Terror" in the Least Likely Places: Tracing Terror in The Hunger Games and Percy Jackson and the Olympians
Guy A. Risko, Binghamton University

3. The Adominable Body: Abjection of the Female Reproductive Body in Stephenie Meyers' Breaking Dawn
Jessica Kander, Eastern Michigan University

4. Film II

8:30-11:45 a.m. and Saturday, November 6th, 8:30-11:45 a.m. (Meeting Suite 2)

Topic: Terror and the Cinematic Sublime
Chair: Todd Comer, Defiance College

Session A

8:30-10:00 a.m.

1. Let's Do It Again: Repackaging, Remaking, and Re-Imagining Seminal Sixties and Seventies Splatter
J. Rocky Colavito, Butler University

2. Horror and Sensory Instability in the Apocalypse Trilogy of John Carpenter
Samantha Deighan, University of Pennsylvania

3. A Real Bad Guy in a Movie World, and Vice Versa: The Bifuracted Gaze of Terror in Tarantino's Death Proof
Jason Seals, Indiana University of Pennsylvania

Session B

10:15-11:45 a.m.

4. Birth as Ethical Sublime in Joel and Ethan Cohen's Fargo
Todd Comer, Defiance College

5. "The coin don't have no say": Authorial Choices in No Country for Old Men
Danielle Glassmeyer, Bradley University

6. Recovering from Nostalgia with Simulation: The Sublime in Visual Culture
Charlotte Segall, Savannah College of Art and Design

Session C

Saturday, November 6th, 8:30-10:00 a.m

7. Processions of Trauma in Hiroshima mon amour: Towards an Ethics of Representation
Nina Varsava, University of British Columbia

8. Banal Antagonism: Terror and the End of History in Day Night Day Night
Guy Witzel, State University of New York at Buffalo

9. Death From Above 2001: Badiou, Iñárritu, and Sublime Terror
Lloyd Isaac Vayo, Bowling Green State University

Session D

Saturday, November 6th, 10:15-11:45 a.m.

10. "Otherwise than Cyborgs": Thoughts on Terror and Levinasian Ethics in Blade Runner
Brad Fruhauff, Loyola University Chicago

11. Twelve Steps To Terror: The Illusion of Control in Lars von Trier's Antichrist
David Williams, Clemson University

12. Nostalgic closure and the aesthetics of the disgusting: Lars von Trier's Antichrist
Nancy Hightower, University of Colorado - Boulder

13. Sexuality, normality and social terror: XXY by Lucía Puenzo
Jorgelina Corbatta, Wayne State University

Associated Organizations

5. Midwest Women's Caucus for the Modern Languages II

8:30-10:00 a.m. (Meeting Suite 3)

Topic: Feminist Pedagogy - Integrating Interdisciplinary Studies and Technology
Format: Roundtable
Chair: Linda Coleman, Eastern Illinois University

1. Memoir Writing: Sharing a Life, Assessing WOM Learning
Janet Labrie, University of Wisconsin-Waukesha

2. Using Blogs in the Feminist Classroom
Sara Puotinen, University of Minnesota

3. Serving/Learning: Using Service Learning in the Women & Gender Studies Classroom
Milton W. Wendland, University of Kansas

4. Visual Rhetoric and Composition Pedagogy
Eve Wiederhold, George Mason University

Special Sessions

6. We Can Smell Your Fear: Terrorizing Animals

8:30-11:45 a.m. (Meeting Suite 4)

Chair: Stacy Hoult-Saros, Valparaiso University

Session A

8:30-10:00 a.m.

1. Living Dolls: Madness, Marriage and Vermin in Quiroga's The Feather Pillow and Ferré's The Youngest Doll
Lynne Flora Margolies, Manchester College

2. "With Terrour, and with Feare": Margaret Cavendish's Hunted Prey as Social Commentary
Lise Mae Schlosser, Northern Illinois University

3. "Wife, serpent or mule": Terrorizing Animals in the Poetry of Candelario Obeso
Stacy Hoult-Saros, Valparaiso University

Session B

10:15-11:45 a.m.

4. Terrorists Terrorized: Reversal of Victimization in Kesey's Predator-Prey Analogies
Olivia Turnage, The University of Memphis

5. Specters of the Animal: Val Lewton's 1940s Horror-Noir and the Gothic Posthuman
Christopher White, Governors State University

6. "The dissecting room and the slaughter-house" in Mary Shelley's Frankenstein
Kathryn Kruger, University of Nebraska

7. The Terrorist Speaks

8:30-10:00 a.m. (Convention Center Room 24 A/B)

1. Leonard Peikoff's Weak Rhetoric of Terror
Claire Edwards, California State Polytechnic University - Pomona

2. The Terrorist Represents: Ekphrasis and Catastrophe in Wilson Harris' The Ghost of Memory
Erin M. Fehskens, University of Chicago

8. The New BOOM: Terror, Memory and Memorialization in Latin America

8:30-10:00 a.m. (Convention Center Room 23 A/B)

Chair: Janis Breckenridge, Whitman College

1. The Art of Commemorating State Terrorism: Memorial Space in Buenos Aires
Janis Breckenridge, Whitman College

2. When the Clandestine Becomes Public: Making Museums out of Torture Centers
Mehera Nori, Whitman College

3. The Argentine "Dirty War" in Cinema Over the Years, or the Iconography of Norma Aleandro
Bécquer Medak-Seguín, Cornell University

4. Beyond Memorialization: Puntas Carreras Mall and the Politics of Memory
Rebbecca Pittenger, University of Kentucky

Permanent Sections

9. Religion and Literature

8:30-10:00 a.m. and 12:00-1:30 p.m. (Convention Center Room 24 C)

Topic: Fiction and Propaganda: Words of Terror
Chair: Corinna Guerrero, Graduate Theological Union
Secretary: Brandi Bingham Kellett, University of Miami

Session A

8:30-10:00 a.m.

1. The Construction of Fear and Horror Through Prophetic Apocalyptic Discourse in The Sundial by Shirley Jackson
Alannah Ari Hernandez, Concordia University Chicago

2. Neither Real nor Imagined: Toni Morrison's Spiritual Space for Redemption in Paradise
Bonnie Miller-O'Dell, Northern Illinois University

3. "Yes, I carry explosives / They're called words": A Study of Religion and Literature in Mohja Kahf
Daniel Dillard, Florida State University

4. What's American about Azzam al-Amriki?: An Analysis of American Al Qaeda Propagandist Adam Gadahn
Jeff Gottlieb, Florida State University

Session B

12:00-1:30 p.m.

5. Refashioning the Tower of London from Imprisonment within: A New Reading of Thomas More's Tower Writings as Catholic Resistance to Royal Terror
Kristen Deiter, Carroll University

6. The Potential of the Category of "Sublime" for Reading the  Episodes of the Stilling of the Storm (Luke 8:22-25) and of the Transfiguration (Luke 9:28-36)
Jean-François Racine, Jesuit School of Theology at Santa Clara University and Graduate Theological Union

7. Eco-Terrorism: Theological Response to Systemic Sin
Irene Quesnot, St. Mary's University

10. Spanish I: Peninsular Literature Before 1700

8:30-11:45 a.m. (Convention Center Room 23 C)

Topic: Open
Chair: R. John McCaw, University of Wisconsin - Milwaukee
Secretary: Julia Domínguez, Iowa State University

Session A

8:30-10:00 a.m.

1. "Terror of Tolerance": Aljamiado Literature and Morisco Religiosities in Sixteenth-Century Spain
Maria del Mar Rosa-Rodriguez, Purdue University - Calumet

2. Moriscos ajusticiados, cristianos mártires de Dios: La dimensión geopolitica de la lucha española por la unidad de la fé
Natalio Ohanna, Western Michigan University

3. La reescritura de la "pérdida de España" en El rey sin reino de Lope de Vega
Javier Irigoyen-Garcia, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Session B

10:15-11:45 a.m.

4. What Can Bad Girls Teach Us? Women's Exemplary Literature in Early Modern Spain
Rosilie Hernández-Pecoraro, University of Illinois at Chicago

5. Cervantes, the Picaresque and Oral Discourse
Chad M. Gasta, Iowa State University

6. La islomanía de Sancho: la isla en el imaginario renacentista
Julia Domínguez, Iowa State University

Associated Organizations

11. The Henry James Society

8:30-10:00 a.m. (Convention Center Room 22 A)

Topic: James and the Fears of Modernity
Chair: June Chung, DePaul University
Secretary: David McWhirter, Texas A&M University

1. The Ambassadors and Remote Authority
Martin Griffin, University of Tennessee Knoxville

2. "A Bath of Benevolence": Immobilization by Arrangement in The Golden Bowl
Viken Tufenkjian, Universite de Montreal

3. Property Nostalgia and the Fear of Global Capitalism in James and Hemingway
David Witzling, Manhattan College

Special Sessions

12. Terrorizing the Personal: Twentieth-Century West European Texts

8:30-10:00 a.m. (Convention Center 22 B)

Chair: James Jones, Central Michigan University

1. The Terror of Sexuality: The Struggle of Ellen von der Weiden
Daniela Richter, Central Michigan University

2. The Fear from Without and the Fear from Within: Terror and Death in Georges Bernanos' Dialogues des Carmélites
Keith Palka, Central Michigan University

3. Terror, Dis-Integration and Re-Integration in Butterfly and Pan's Labyrinth: Cinematic Representations of the Spanish Civil War
Norma Richardson, Central Michigan University

4. The Language of Terror vs. the Language of Sex: German AIDS Discourses in the 1990s
James Jones, Central Michigan University

13. Female Editors Shaping Modernism

8:30-10:00 a.m. (Convention Center Room 22 C)

Chair: Belinda Wheeler, Southern Illinois University - Carbondale

1. Crossing the Atlantic in Print during WWI: H.D., Marianne Moore, and The Egoist
Nikolaus Wasmoen, University of Rochester

2. Reclaiming her Turf: Lola Ridge's Editorial Role at Broom
Belinda Wheeler, Southern Illinois University - Carbondale

14. Terror in Fiction

8:30-11:45 a.m. (Convention Center Room 21 A)

Session A

8:30-10:00 a.m.

1. The Nightmare of Edwardian London: Terror, Anarchy, and Modernism in Joseph Conrad's The Secret Agent and G.K. Chesterton's The Man Who Was Thursday
Christopher DeVault, Mount Mercy University

2. Displacements of Torture, or Two Almost-Lynchings in Charles Chesnutt's Marrow of Tradition and Pauline Hopkins' Winona
Amina Gautier, Saint Joseph's University

Session B

10:15-11:45 a.m.

3. Familial Terror in the Novels of Tatiana de Rosnay
Norval Bard, North Central College

4. Eduviges and the representations of terror and memory in Pedro Páramo
Sarah A. Miller Boelts, University of Minnesota

5. Italo Calvino's Literary Terrorism in If on a Winter's Night a Traveler
Matt Hlinak, Northwestern University

Permanent Sections

15. American Literature II: Literature After 1870

10:15-11:45 a.m. (Meeting Suite 1)

Topic: Terror, Terrorism, and American Literature
Chair: Whitney Womack Smith, Miami University Hamilton
Secretary: Rynetta Davis, University of Kentucky

1. Terror on the Homefront: Lynching, Literature, and African American Domesticity
Michelle Taylor Watts, Independent Scholar

2. The Lynching Intercessor in the Works of Charles W. Chesnutt
Abby Horne, Washington University

3. Henry James and the Pleasures of Conspiracy Theory
Alex Beringer, University of Michigan

4. Have We Lost Our Heros in Post 9/11 Narratives?: Television, Trauma, Theory, & Terrorism
Melissa Ames, Eastern Illinois University

16. Film II

Session B

10:15-11:45 a.m. (Meeting Suite 2)

(see Session #4 – 8:30 a.m.)

Associated Organizations

17. American Dialect Society

10:15-1:30 p.m. (Meeting Suite 3)

Topic: Language Variation and Change in the United States and Canada
Chair: Susan M. Burt, Illinois State University
Secretary: Erica Benson, University of Wisconsin - Eau Claire

Session A

10:15-11:45 a.m.

1. Making a Soldier out of a Civilian: Linguistic Identity in the U.S. Military
Megan Kirtley, University of Hawaii

2. Well Used as a Response Token in Southern American English
Amanda Rapone, Old Dominion University

Session B

12:00-1:30 p.m.

3. Hegel Haggles for a Hawk: Low Vowels on the Move in Northwestern Wisconsin
Erica Benson, Michael Fox, and Jared Balkman, University of Wisconsin - Eau Claire

4. Merger Within the Individual
Matt Bauer, Illinois Institute of Technology

5. Strong Wisconsin: Final Laryngeal neutralization
Eric Raimy, University of Wisconsin

Special Sessions

18. We Can Smell Your Fear: Terrorizing Animals

Session B

10:15-11:45 a.m. (Meeting Suite 4)

(see Session #6 – 8:30 a.m.)

19. Gender and Terror

10:15-11:45 a.m. (Convention Center Room 24 A/B)

1. "He Had Sinned": Containment and Desire in James Baldwin's Go Tell It On the Mountain
Paula Burns, University of South Dakota

2. "You can't trust wolves no more nor women": Rabies and Mercy Killings in Bram Stoker's Dracula
Kery Chez, CUNY Graduate Center

3. Embody Gender: Gender Multiplicity versus the Gender Binary in Contemporary Horror Film
Evon Hawkins, University of Southern Indiana

20. Posthumanisms and the "Terror" of (Bio) Technologies

10:15-1:30 p.m. and 3:20-4:50 p.m. (Convention Center Room 23 A/B)

Session A and C - Chair: MaryAnne Laurico, Queen's University

Session B – Chair: Dale Tracy, Queen's University

Session A

10:15-11:45 a.m.

1. Where's the Real Threat? Campus Biometrics and the Digital (Human)ities
Rachael Sullivan, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee

2. Pirates and Kings and Messiahs: The New Homo Sacer and the Age of Technology
Marissa Fugate, University of Missouri

3. Consider the Jellyfish: A Revision of the Vulnerability of Life and the Politics of Death
Kate Sullivan, Rice University

Session B

12:00-1:30 p.m.

4. Elastic Futures, Malleable Pasts:The Past and Future of Plasticity in Ray Kurzweil and Thomas King
Ryan Porter, Queen's University

5. Plug and Play: Fantasies of the (Dis)embodied Subject in Avatar and Dollhouse
Mattie Burkert, University of Wisconsin-Madison

6. Speculative Affects: Nonhuman Emergences in Literature and New Media
Patrick Jagoda, University of Chicago

Session C

3:20-4:50 p.m.

7. Toward a Posthumanist Ethic: Meat-Eating, Cannibalism, and Urban Space in Clive Barker's The Midnight Meat Train
Cheng Yi (Coral) Wu, University of Nevada, Reno

8. "Something fierce and ogreish": Reading Animal Agency In Marian Engel's Bear
Jaime Denike, Queen's University

9. Consuming Risky Generic Narratives: Mutated Agency and Mangled Bodies in Hiromi Goto's Hopeful Monsters
MaryAnne Laurico, Queen's University

21. The Philosophical-Literary Hybrid Text

10:15-11:45 a.m. and 1:40-3:10 p.m. (Convention Center Room 24 C)

Chair: Agnes Malinowska, University of Chicago

Session A: Conflicts

1. Henry More and the Uses of Allegory in the War over the Soul in the Mid-Seventeenth Century
Melissa Caldwell, Eastern Illinois University

2. "Words are but wind": The "Atomic" Wit of Swift's Tale of a Tub
Matthew Augustine, Washington University in Saint Louis

3. The Biographia Literaria and the Metaphysics of Hybridity
Hanna Janiszewska, Stanford University

4. Indirect Communication and Inwardness in Kierkegaard's Either/Or
Hannah Mosher, University of Chicago

Session B: Convergences
1:40-3:10 p.m.

5. The Concept of Game, at Play in the Zhuangzi
Alan Levinovitz, University of Chicago

6. Hybridity and Healing in Boethius' Consolation of Philsophy
Bart Van Wassenhove, University of Chicago

7. Earthbound Language, Sky-bound Thought: Reading Thoreau's Journal as a Hybrid Text
Edmund Goode, Villanova University

8. The Philosophical Poetics of the Death of God and the Decentering of the Subject in Leopardi and Nietzsche
Lisa Barca, University of Chicago

Permanent Sections

22. Spanish I: Peninsular Literature Before 1700

Session B

10:15-11:45 a.m. (Convention Center Room 23 C)
(see Session #10 – 8:30 a.m.)

Workshops

23. Midwest Women's Caucus for the Modern Languages

10:15-11:45 a.m. (Regency Ballroom C)

Topic: Women's Studies: A Support in Navigating Jobs and Tenure
Format: Workshop
Chair: Linda Coleman, Eastern Illinois University

1. Changing Landscapes: Professionalization in the 21st Century
Milton Wendland, University of Kansas

2. NWSA Beefs Up Professionalization Support: From Long-Term AIS to Tenure in WST
Jeannie Ludlow, Eastern Illinois University

Special Sessions

24. Vampire Narratives: Pleasure and Terror in Fiction, Film, and Television

10:15-11:45 a.m. (Convention Center Room 22 B)

Chair: Jennifer Camden, University of Indianapolis

1. Historical Terror: Vampire Narratives in the Historical Contexts Portrayed in Works by Anne Rice, Chelsea Quinn Yarbro, Andre Codrescu, and Bram Stoker
Ellen Tsagaris, Kaplan University

2. Vampire Imagery in Jane Eyre Lore
Sara Wright, University of Indianapolis

3. "Immortal Age Beside Immortal Youth": The Aging Vampire
Sumangala Bhattacharya, Pitzer University

4. Varney the Vampire: Vampire Fiction Before Dracula
Jennifer Camden, University of Indianapolis

Permanent Sections

25. Shakespeare and Shakespearean Criticism II

10:15-11:45 a.m. (Convention Center Room 22 C)

Topic: "The Terrors of the Earth": Unspeakable, Unviewable, Unrepresentable Violence in King Lear
Format: Roundtable
Chair: Donald Hedrick, Kansas State University

1. Undoing Visual Possession: Trappings and Tropings of Terror
Joan Pong Linton, Indiana University

2. King Lear's Blinding, Shock, Fear, and the (Comic?) Spectacle of Male Vulnerability in “Slings and Arrows”
Francesca Royster, Depaul University

3. Synaesthesia, Anaesthesia, Aesthetics
William West, Northwestern University

4. Eyeballs of Entertainment
Donald Hedrick, Kansas State University

Special Sessions

26. Terror in Fiction

Session B

10:15-11:45 a.m. (Convention Center Room 21 A)

(see Session #14 – 8:30 a.m.)

27. The Subject of Terror

10:15-11:45 a.m. (Convention Center Room 21 B)

1. Nature and Terror
Martha Bohrer, North Central College

2. The Terror of Individuation in Samuel Taylor Coleridge's "The Rime of the Ancyent Marinere"(1798)
David Frank Jakalski, University of Illinois at Chicago

3. Gertrude Stein and the Terror of Identity
Patrick Shaw, University of Southern Indiana

Permanent Sections

28. Shakespeare and Shakespearean Criticism I

12:00-1:30 p.m. (Meeting Suite 1)

Topic: Terror in Shakespeare and Shakespearean Critcism
Chair: Vanessa Corredera, Northwestern University

1. "Make [him] black and bid him sing": Othello's African Americanization
Leslie Anne Singel, Irish American Heritage Center

2. Don't Stop Believing in an Ending: Measure for Measure and The Sopranos
Joseph Sullivan, Marietta College

3. Shylock's Moral Code
Michael Hernandez, Depaul University

29. Film III

12:00-1:30 p.m. (Meeting Suite 2)

Topic: Terror in Contemporary Latin American Film
Chair: Anna M. Proffit, Knox College
Secretary: Carolina Rocha, Southern Illinois University-Carbondale

1. Representation of Repression and Censorship in Two Argentine Films
Jorgelina Corbatta, Wayne State University

2. Secretos de familia: homosexualidad y crimen durante la dictadura paraguaya
Rafaela Fiore, Catholic University of America

3. The Terrorized Model Woman in Garage Olimpo
Rebecca Ulland, Northern Michigan University

4. Echos of Terror and Conspiracies of Silence in Lucrecia Martel's La mujer sin cabeza
Dianna Niebylski, University of Illinois at Chicago

Associated Organizations

30. American Dialect Society

Session B

12:00-1:30 p.m. (Meeting Suite 3)

(see Session #17 – 10:15 a.m.)

Special Sessions

31. What Does the Terrorist Want? (Meeting Suite 4)

12:00-1:30 p.m.

Chair: Alpana Sharma, Wright State University

1. A Kinder, Gentler Afghanistan?: The Dangers Implicit in Khaled Hosseini's Representation of Afghanistan in The Kite Runner
Daniel Pinney, University of Southern Mississippi

2. Romancing the Bomb: Muslim Men as Objects of Love and Subjects of Terror in Recent Bollywood Films
Alpana Sharma, Wright State University

3. "Resonating with the Other": 9/11 through Indian Eyes
Harveen Mann, Loyola University Chicago

32. Imagining Terror

12:00-1:30 p.m. (Convention Center Room 24 A/B)

1. The Ethics of Cinematic Psychosis: The Implications of Psychotic Structure in Gasper Noe's Irreversible
Joshua Cohen, University of Northern Colorado

2. (un)Life and (un)Death: Psychological Reactions to Trauma in The Walking Dead
Mark Heimermann, University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee

3. Talking to Ghosts: Hauntology and the Recovery of Historical Memory in Juan Antonio Bayona's The Orphange (2007)
Timothy P. Reed, Ripon College

33. Posthumanisms and the 'Terror' of (Bio) Technologies

Session B

12:00-1:30 p.m. (Convention Center Room 23 A/B)

(see Session #20 – 10:15 a.m.)

Permanent Sections

34. Religion and Literature

Session B

12:00-1:30 p.m. (Convention Center Room 24 C)

(see Session #9 – 8:30 a.m.)

Special Sessions

35. Witnessing Terror

12:00-1:30 p.m. (Convention Center Room 23 C)

1. The Poetics of Distance and Intimacy in Charlotte Delbo's Auschwitz and After
Sophie Hand, North Central College

2. "It is always already repeating itself": Postmemory, Shame and Ongoing Testimony in Roth's Holocaust Fiction
Maggie McKinley, Marquette University

36. Topographies of Terror: Autobiography, Memory, and Family Narratives (Convention Center Room 22 A)

12:00-1:30 p.m.

Chair: Susanna Hoeness-Krupsaw, University of Southern Indiana

1. Terror, Trauma, and Fear: Definitions in Contemporary Memoir
Julia Galbus, University of Southern Indiana

2. Writing to Fix It: Narratives of Death, Despair, and Downright Disbelief
Leisa Belleau, University of Southern Indiana

3. The Melancholy of Inverted Passing: Racial Trauma and Terror in Toi Derricotte's The Black Notebooks
Xiao Di "Janice" Tong, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

4. The Family Dance of Terror in Joyce Carol Oates' We Were the Mulvaneys
Susanna Hoeness-Krupsaw, University of Southern Indiana

Permanent Sections

36.1. The Mezzezah and the Mestizaje

12:00-1:30 p.m. (Convention Center Room 22 B)

Topic: Jewish Latin America
Chair: Lynne Flora Margolies, Manchester College
Secretary: Joanna Mitchell, Denison University

1. Sephardic Literary Production in the Postnational Age
Adolfo Campoy-Cubillo, University of Chicago

2. Memorializing Disappearance in Nora Strjilevich's A Single Numberless Death
Lydia Gil Keff, University of Denver

3. Remembering Jesus Mari'a and Amsterdam: The (Re)Construction of Mexico City's Jewish Past
Joanna Mitchell, Denison University

Special Sessions

37. Arms and Letters? Or the fear in the letters of Colonial Discourse

12:00-1:30 p.m. (Convention Center Room 22 C)

Chair: Néstor Quiroa, Wheaton College
Discussant: Steven Gardner, Illinois College

1. Nahuas y españoles en la conquista de México: (Re)valoraciones del terror como arma de guerra en Cortés, Sahagún y los Anales de Tlatelolco
Leisa Kauffmann, Wayne State University

2. Tóxcatl, Terror y Texto
Pablo García Loaeza, West Virginia University

3. The "mestizo threat" in the 'Memorial y relación verdadera…de cosas del reino del Perú' (Cochabamba 1632, Madrid 1634) by Fray Bernardino de Cádenas, OFM
Nicanor Domínguez, Boise State University

4. Recording the Popol Vuh Creation Narrative: Friar Francisco Ximénez, the Maya-K´ich´e and the Vow to Spiritural purging in Colonial Guatelmala
Néstor Quiroa, Wheaton College; Discussant: Steven Gardner, Illinois College

Permanent Sections

38. Science and Fiction

12:00-1:30 p.m. (Convention Center Room 21 A)

Topic: Alternate Lives, Alternate Futures in Science Fiction: Touching the Branes of the Multiverse
Chair: Mary Catherine Harper and A.K. Drees, Defiance College

1. Human Clones in Everyday Life: The Uncanny Familiarity of the Alternate World: Reading Kazuo Ishiguro's Never Let Me Go (2005)
Sunyoung Ahn, University of Minnesota

2. Imagining the Future of Time in Ray Bradbury's The Martian Chronicles
Jennifer Smith, Indiana University

3. Lost: Flashbacks, Flashforwards, and Do-Overs
Sarah Burcon, University of Toledo

39. International Francophone Studies

12:00-1:30 p.m. (Convention Center Room 21 B)

Topic: Le vois-yage dans les textes de la littérature monde en français (all papers will be in French)

Chair: Helene Diaz Brown, Principia College
Secretary: Brigitte Hamon-Porter, Hope College

1. Voyage au bout de l'enfer islamiste: de la Tour Eiffel aux Twin Towers
Alek Baylee Toumi, University of Wisconsin-Stevens Point

2. De Traversée de la Mangrove à La Belle Créole: La poétique de l'île selon Maryse Condé
Brigitte Hamon-Porter, Hope College

3. Voyages et insularité dans Pluie et vent sur Télumée Miracle de Simone Schwarz-Bart
Véronique Maisier, Southern Illinois University-Carbondale

4. Monde-frontières, écritures du voyage: le cas du Village de l'Allemand, de Boualem Sansal
Bernard Aresu, Rice University

Meetings

40. Women’s Caucus of the Modern Languages/Midwest Business Meeting

Presiding: Linda Coleman, Eastern Illinois University

12:00-3:10 p.m. (Boardroom 2)

Permanent Sections

41. Art What Thou Eat: Food in Literature, Art and Culture

1:40-6:30 p.m. (Meeting Suite 1)

Topic: Open
Chair: Arline Cravens, Saint Louis University
Secretary: Lynne F. Margolies, Manchester College

Session A

1:40-3:10 p.m.

1. Sons and Lovers: Lawrence's Psychological Transference of Carbs, Colors and Calories
Teri Holtzclaw, Texas State University

2. Over-indulging with Zola: Le Ventre de Paris
Susie Hennessy, Missouri Western State University

3. Eating What Thou Art: Food and Identity in Guzmán de Alfarache
Madera Allan, Lawrence University

4. Literary Gardens in the Correspondence of Marie de Sévigné
Arline Cravens, Saint Louis University

Session B

3:20-4:50 p.m.

5. Psychedelicacies: The Delicious, Erotic Body in The Swamp Thing
Zeke Jarvis, Eureka College

6. Sauces and Spices, Morsels and Meat: The Food Metaphor in Henry Fielding's Tom Jones
Mandy Nydegger, Baylor University

7. Eat His Cake and Have It, Too: Gender Norms and Images of Food
Laura Fasick, Minnesota State University Moorhead

8. The Authenticity of the Cupboard: Teaching Victorians to Define the Dangers of Food Adulteration
Julie Kraft, University of Indiana-Bloomington

Session C

5:00-6:30 p.m.

9. The Mutual Terror and Delight of Fish Sticks and Frito Pie: White Trash Posing in the 'Burbs'
Cammie Sublette, University of Arkansas-Fort Smith

10. Aliens, Anorexics, and Narrative Confrontations with the Biomedical Discourse of Eating Disorders
Megan Milks, University of Illinois at Chicago

11. More Cumin than Cumin: Narratives and Ethnicity and 'Otherness' in Mexican Restaurant Fiction
Jeffrey Janosik, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee

42. African American Literature

1:40-4:50 p.m. (Meeting Suite 2)

Topic: African American Literature and the “Post-Racial”
Chair: Gregory Laski, Northwestern University
Secretary: M. Asher Daniels, Northwestern University

Session A

1:40-3:10 p.m.

1. Class, Culture and the "Post-Racial" in W.E.B. Du Bois
Jonathan Poore, University of Illinois at Chicago

2. Pauline Hopkins' Post-Racial Fantasy: Of One Blood, the Back to Africa Plot and the Problem with Monogensis
M. Asher Daniels, Northwestern University

3. Race, Representation and the Politics of Respectability
Melanie Hernández, University of Washington

Session B

3:20-4:50 p.m.

4. Not Sidney's Money: Percival Everett and the Possibilities of the Post-Racial
Sarah Mantilla Griffin, University of Pennsylvania

5. Post?racialism, American Africanism and Rap Minstrelsy
D. Sajnani, Northwestern University

6. Choice and a Potentially Post-Racial World: Transnational/Transgender Approaches to Race in Twentieth-Century African American Liteature
Erica Chu, Loyola University Chicago

43. Italian

1:40-6:30 p.m. (Meeting Suite 3)

Topic: Theatre and Theatricality in Modern and Contemporary Italian Literature and Visual Media
Chair: Stefano Boselli, Gettysburg College

Session A

1:40-3:10 p.m.

1. Teatralizzazione di un romanzo: i costumi di scena degli Indifferenti di Moravia
Chiara De Santi, SUNY Fredonia

2. Pasolini e lo strappo nella coscienza dello spettatore
Fulvio Orsitto, California State Univerisity - Chico

3. Lina Wertmüller regista-burattinaia
Federico Pacchioni, University of Connecticut - Storrs

Session B

3:20-4:50 p.m.

4. Manzoni's Count of Carmagnola and Kleist's Prince of Homburg: History between Fiction and Factuality
Maria Giulia Carone, University of Wisconsin - Madison

5. Teatro e teatralità nella poesia del primo Palazzeschi
Daniele Fioretti, University of Wisconsin - Madison

6. Mario Luzi's Plays: A Plurality of Voices
Ernesto Livorni, University of Wisconsin - Madison

Session C

5:00-6:30 p.m.

7. Distinctive Nature of Masques of Commedia dell'Arte in their Relationship with Food in 18th Century Visual Arts
Paola Monte, Royal Holloway, University of London

8. Arlecchino is Lying: Deconstructing Goldoni's II bugiardo
Stefano Boselli, Gettysburg Collage

9. The Spectator in Dario Fo's Performances: From the Foyer to the Post-Performance Debates
Marco Valleriani, Royal Holloway, University of London

44. Spanish II: Peninsular Literature After 1700

1:40-4:50 p.m. (Meeting Suite 4)

Topic: Terror and Horror in Spanish Literature and Film
Chair: Kathleen Doyle, Rhodes College
Secretary: Susan Divine, Westminster College

Session A

1:40-3:10 p.m.

1. Chilling Beauty: Terror and the Fantastic as a Means of Subverting the Feminine Ideal in La mujer fría and La resucitada
Kathleen Doyle, Rhodes College

2. The Terror of Rape in the Works of Antonio Buero Vallejo
Alison Ridley, Hollins University

3. Francine: la construcción de la mujer autómata en la literaturea española contemporánea
Pilar Martínez-Quiroga, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

4. The Fear of Remembering: Self-discovery in the Post-Franco Spanish Novel
James Courtad, Bradley University

Session B

3:20-4:50 p.m.

5. Fear in Miguel Delibes's El hereje (1998)
Chikako Maruta, Kelo University, Yokohama City, Japan

6. Consumer Culture, Torture, and Excess in the Films of Alex de la Iglesia
Susan Divine, Westminster College

7. Nadie conoce a nadie: The Destruction of Seville and the Devil on the Loose
Eugenia Romero, The Ohio State University

8. Cazador de Mentiras: ¿un desafío a las exigencias sociales o una afirmación del statu quo?
Olga Bezhanova, Southern Illinois University

Special Sessions

45. Dire la Shoah: entre nécessité et impossibilité

1:40-4:50 p.m. (Convention Center Room 24 A/B)

Chair: Monica Garoiu, Kenyon College

Session A

1:40-3:10 p.m.

1. Substituting for the Other: Writing and Ethics in Eugène Ionesco's Maximilian Kolbe and Primo Levi's If This is a Man
Ana-Maria M´Enesti, University of Oregon

2. A peine commencions-nous à raconter que nous suffoquions: la notion d'indicible dans L'espèce humaine de Robert Antelme
Stéphane Roussel, Collège André Malraux, Trun, France

3. Trauma et témoignage dans "Rue Ordener, rue Labat" de Sarah Kofman
Monica Garoiu, Kenyon College

Session B

3:20-4:50 p.m.

4. Une certaine tendance du cinéma français: la Shoah et la fiction au risque de l'historiographie
Alain Kleinberger, Université Paris Ouest Nanterre La Défense, France

5. Shoah: I'rreprésentable et le projet technique d'étrangeté
Michel Faucheux, Centre des humanités, INSA, Lyon, France

6. "Neither Ruin nor Museum": Arnaud de Pallière's Drancy Avenir and the Poetics of Memory
Sandy Flitterman-Lewis, Rutgers University

47. The Philosophical-Literary Hybrid Text

Session B: Convergences

1:40-3:10 p.m. (Convention Center Room 24 C)

(see Session #21 – 10:15 a.m.)

Associated Organizations

48. The International Raymond Carver Society

1:40-3:10 p.m. (Convention Center Room 23 C)

Topic: Terror in the Works of Raymond Carver
Chair: Sandra Kleppe, Hedmark University College, Norway

1. Discomposure: Carver and the Other
Robert Miltner, Kent State University

2. Raymond Carver's Grunge Fictions
Angela Sorby, Marquette University

3. Raymond Carver's Self-Referential Poetry
Sandra Kleppe, Hedmark University College, Norway

49. Association for the Study of Literature and Environment

1:40-3:10 p.m. (Convention Center Room 22 A)

Topic: Teaching Place through the Humanities
Format: Roundtable
Chair: Thomas Dean, University of Iowa

1. Matthew Low, University of Iowa

2. Zachary Michael Jack, Associate Professor, North Central College

3. Thomas Dean, Special Assistant to the President, University of Iowa

Permanent Sections

50. English I: English Literature Before 1800

1:40-3:10 p.m. (Convention Center Room 22 B)

Topic: Crisis of Faith
Chair: Caitlin L. Kelly, University of Missouri-Columbia
Secretary: Rebecca Roma Stoll, University of Iowa

1. Sodom and Genoa: King Arthur's Confronation With an Evil Giant and a Crisis of Faith in the Roman Papacy in Malory's Le Morte Darthur
Michael Sarabia, University of Iowa

2. "The readiness of all": Crisis of Faith and Spiritual Resolution in Hamlet
Jennifer Randonis, Anderson University

3. Fielding's Conversible World: Conversation and Happiness in Tom Jones
Nathan Kempf, University of Missouri-Columbia

4. Advocating Peace through Caleb Williams
Cynthia Bandish, Bluffton University

51. Old and Middle English Language and Literature

1:40-3:10 p.m. (Convention Center Room 22 C)

Topic: Saints and Sanctuaries: Old and Middle English Hagiography
Chair: Erik Carlson, University of Minnesota
Secretary: Lyndsay Craig, University of Minnesota

1. Listening for Fame: "Hlisa" or "Fame of The Ears"
Jack R. Baker, Spring Arbor University

2. "Beorg:" The Wished-for Barrow in "Guthlac A"
Stephanie Clark, University of Illinois at Champaign-Urbana

3. Anglo-Scandinavian Saint-Kings ca. 1300
Adam Oberlin, University of Minnesota

4. Text for Terror: "Vita S. Edmundi" and Aethelred's Foreign Policy
Larry Swain, University of Illinois at Chicago

52. French I

1:40-3:10 p.m. (Convention Center Room 21 A)

Topic: Literature and Error
Chair: Jacob Schott, Ohio State University

1. Path's of Error: Where Blanchot's Aminadab Intersects Kafka's The Castle
Jacob Schott, Ohio State University

2. Molloy's Journey into the Ground: The Invention of Nothing in the Novels of Beckett
Jacob Hovind, Emory University

53. Children's Literature

1:40-3:10 p.m. (Convention Center Room 21 B)

Topic: Growing Up with Them: Children's Series
Chair: Guy A. Risko, Binghamton University

1. Daemons, Dust and Growing Up in Philip Pullman's His Dark Materials
Shawna McDermott, Texas A & M University

2. Negotiating Female Relationships in L. M. Montgomery's Anne of Green Gables series
Valerie Murrenus Pilmaier, University of Wisconsin-Sheboygan

3. Percy Jackson and the Cartesian Moment
Jennifer Sweeney, Binghamton University

4. "The Universe would turn into a mighty stranger": Girlhood, Adolescence and the Self in Wuthering Heights and The Twilight Saga
Kasey Butcher, Miami University Ohio

54. Popular Culture

1:40-6:30 p.m. (Convention Center Room 21 C)

Topic: Monsters and the Monstrous in Popular Culture
Chair: Susan J. Wolfe, University of South Dakota
Secretary: Lee Roripaugh, University of South Dakota

Session A

1:40-3:10 p.m.

1. Dexter, Murder, and Performativity: Dissecting the Line Between Monstrosity and Masculinity in the Showtime Series
Kasey Butcher, Miami University - Ohio

2. (Re)positioning the Myth of the Vampire in the Light of Patriarchy: A Gendered Analysis of Coppola's Dracula and Romero's Martin
Suchismita Banerjee, University of Wisconsin - Milwaukee

3. Blood Ties: The Monstrous Family in Martin and Near Dark
Paul Huggins, Southern Illinois University-Carbondale

4. Potential vs. Pathology in Young Frankenstein
Lori Newcomb, Wayne State University

Session B

3:20-4:50 p.m.

5. Who Are You Calling a Monster? The Noble Werewolf in Marie de France's Bisclavret
Stephanie Lohse, University of St. Thomas

6. The Cyborg as Monstrous Other in the Whedonverse
Susan J. Wolfe, University of South Dakota

7. Terror and its Afterlife in Lost
Katie Muth, Washington University in Saint Louis

Session C

5:00-6:30 p.m.

8. Vampires and Cyborgs / Subjects and Objects
Jasmine Hall, Elms College

9. Post-War Paranoia, Psychology, and the Psychopath
Alexis Wilson, Indiana University - Bloomington

10. "No More Snuggles?": Monstrous Doubles and Uncanny Identity Politics in Adolescent Fantasy Texts
Courtney Huse Wika, Black Hills State University

55. Art What Thou Eat: Food in Literature, Art and Culture

Session B

3:20-4:50 p.m. (Meeting Suite 1)

(see Session #41 – 1:40 p.m.)

56. African American Literature

Session B

3:20-4:50 p.m. (Meeting Suite 2)

(see Session #42 – 1:40 p.m.)

57. Italian

Session B

3:20-4:50 p.m. (Meeting Suite 3)

(see Session #44 – 1:40 p.m.)

58. Spanish II: Peninsular Literature After 1700

Session B: Terror and Horror in Spanish Literature and Film

3:20-4:50 p.m. (Meeting Suite 4)

(see Session #44 – 1:40 p.m.)

Special Sessions

59. Dire la Shoah: entre nécessité et impossibilité

Session B

3:20-4:50 p.m. (Convention Center Room 24 A/B)

(see Session #45 – 1:40 p.m.)

59.1. Posthumanisms and the 'Terror' of (Bio) Technologies

Session C

3:20-4:50 p.m. (Convention Center Room 23 A/B)

(see Session #20 – 10:15 a.m.)

Associated Organizations

60. Society for the Study of Midwestern Literature

3:20-6:30 p.m. (Convention Center Room 24 C)

Chair: Marilyn Judith Atlas, Ohio University

Session A: Literature, Terror, and the Unconventional Midwest

3:20-4:50 p.m.

1. "The Girls on the Roof": Mary Swander and the Mississippi Flood of 1993
Mary Obuchowski, Central Michigan University

2. The Conservationist Manifesto of Scott Russell Sanders
Christian Knoeller, Purdue University

3. Terror, the Midwest and the Lure of the Grotesque in Tracy Letts's "August: Osage County"
Marilyn Judith Atlas, Ohio University

Session B: Heartlessness in the Heartland - Midwestern Literature and the Lure of the Grotesque

5:00-6:30 p.m.

4. 'Then She'll Jump': Hamlin Garland's Prodigal Private and the Great Banquet of Surprise
Richmond B. Adams, Andrew College

5. 'He Was a Son of G-d': Understanding the Grotesque in The Great Gatsby
ShaunAnne Tangney, Minnesota State University Moorhead

6. Night Terrors and Domestic Abuse in Midwestern Hmong American Literature
Lisa Long, North Central College

7. South Siders: Cyrus Colter's Chicago Grotesque
Ronald Primeau, Central Michigan University

Special Sessions

61. German Women Writers

3:20-6:30 p.m. (Convention Center Room 23 C)

Chair: Amy Kepple Strawser, Otterbein University
Secretary: Daniela Richter, Central Michigan University

Session A

3:20-4:50 p.m.

1. Women's Rights and Femininity's Others: Fanny Lewald's Fiction and Political Letters
Traci O'Brien, Auburn University

2. Eva Justin: the Gypsy Research
Habiba Hadziavdic, University of St. Thomas

3. Writing Their / story: Women, History and the Historical Novels of Benedikte Naubert
Julie Koser, University of Maryland

Session B

5:00-6:30 p.m.

4. Anna Seghers and Her Female Characters
Min Zhou, Roger Williams University

5. Flying into History: Irmtraud Morgner's Leben und Abenteuer der Trobadora Beatriz nach Zeugnissen ihrer Spielfrau Laura as "ein Hexenroman" (1974)
Qinna Shen, Miami University

6. Irmtraud Mogner's Leben und Abenteuer der Trobadora Beatriz: Bringing the World(s) into Balance
Gabriel Cooper, University of Virginia

Permanent Sections

62. Drama

3:20-6:30 p.m. (Convention Center Room 22 A)

Topic: Avant-Gardes
Chair: Craig N. Owens, Drake University
Secretary: Judith Roof, Rice University

Session A

3:20-4:50 p.m.

1. Avant-Gardening: Susan Glaspell's Breath of Life
Jesse Curran, Stony Brook University

2. Sweep it Under the Table: Edna St. Vincent Millay's Political Aesthetics in Aria da Capo
Kate Ridinger, West Virginia University

3. Back to the Future: The Fluxus Movement
Stephanie Phillips, California State University - North Ridge

Session B

5:00-6:30 p.m.

4. En Garde!: Lubricious Modernims, or, Take That Eiffel Tower Out of Your Mouth, or, Please Don't Masticate the Phallus
Craig N. Owens, Drake University, Lance Norman, Michigan State University and Judith Roof, Rice University

63. History of Critical Reception

3:20-6:30 p.m. (Convention Center Room 22 B)

Chair: Philip Goldstein, University of Delaware
Secretary: James Machor, Kansas State University

Session A

3:20-4:50 p.m.

1. Reading Across Social Difference
Patsy Schweickart, Purdue University

2. Let's Talk About Texts: The Evaluative Language of Everyday Readers
Cecilia Farr, St. Catherine University

3. Re-reader Response Theory
Joseph Sullivan, Marietta College

Session B

5:00-6:30 p.m.

4. Oprah's Online Readings of Franzen's The Connections
Amy Blair, Marquette University

5. Morality and Parody in Northanger Abbey
Philip Goldstein, University of Delaware

6. "The Section to Which We Belong": New York's Reception of the Transcendentalists
David Dowling, University of Iowa

Special Sessions

64. Comparative Terror/Comparative Security

3:20-6:30 p.m. (Convention Center Room 22 C)

Session A – Chair and Moderator: Mary N. Layoun, University of Wisconsin-Madison
Session B - Moderator: Elizabeth Zanichkowsky, University of Wisconsin-Waukesha
Format: Roundtable

Session A

3:20-4:50 p.m.

1. Terror and the Notion of Angst/anguish in the Thought of Kierkegaard, Heidegger, and Derrida
Max Statkiewicz, University of Wisconsin-Madison

2. Terror and Security: Ours and Theirs
Maya Aghasi, University of Wisconsin-Madison

3. Haitian Immigrants in U.S. Customs and Border Protection: A Case Study in Edwidge Danticat's Brother, I'm Dying
Laini Kavaloski-Pront, Edgewood College

4. Detecting Security in the Modern Novel
Faith Portier, University of Wisconsin-Madison

5. Our Security in Their Homeland: Translations in Women's Writings
Janelle Pulczinski, University of Wisconsin-Madison

Session B

5:00-6:30 p.m.

6. Terror and the State
Len Kaplan, University of Wisconsin-Madison

7. Securing Gender in Early Modern Comedy
Jeanette Goddard, University of Wisconsin-Madison

8. Simone Bitton's "The Wall" and the Murmuring Capital City
Ziad M. Suidan, University of Wisconsin-Madison

9. Citizenship, Political Crisis, and Witness: Testimonials to Tramua
Marian Halls, University of Wisconsin-Madison

10. Visibility & Security?: The Headscarf, the Hijab, and the Burqa in France
Joelle Tybon, University of Wisconsin-Madison

65. Cold Feet: Marriage and Fear in the Eighteenth Century

3:20-4:50 p.m. (Convention Center Room 21 A)

Chair: Andromeda Hartwick, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor

1. False Reassurance in the Eighteenth-Century Marriage Plot
Andromeda Hartwick, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor

2. Apocalyptic Paramours: "Wives" Made, Lives Undone
Karen McConnell, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor

3. Clarissa and the Imperial Family Model
Geremy Carnes, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor

66. Erotic Materialism

3:20-4:50 p.m. (Convention Center Room 21 B)

Chair: Salita Seibert, Carnegie Mellon University

1. Printing Erotica
Salita Seibert, Carnegie Mellon University

2. The "Spicy" Proletariat: Radical Fiction in 1950's Erotica
Jess Wilton, Carnegie Mellon University

3. Of The Wonders of the Unseen World: Collisions of Narrative, Desire, and Agency in Stag Film
Eric Vazquez, Carnegie Mellon University

Permanent Sections

67. Popular Culture

Session B

3:20-4:50 p.m. (Convention Center Room 21 C)

(see Session #54 – 1:40 p.m.)

68. Art What Thou Eat: Food in Literature, Art and Culture

Session C

5:00-6:30 p.m. (Meeting Suite 1)

(see Session #41 – 1:40 p.m.)

Special Sessions

69. Early Modern Terror

5:00-6:30 p.m. (Meeting Suite 2)

1. Terror and Visual Persuasion in John Foxe's Book of Martyrs: A Cognitive Approach
Sarah Gretter, Purdue University

2. The Stoic Body in Cyril Tourneur's The Atheist's Tragedy
Matthew Kendrick, University of Pittsburgh

3. "O, horrible! O, horrible! most horrible!": Hamlet's Ghost and the Terror of Abjection
Chikako D. Kumamoto, College of Dupage

Permanent Sections

70. Italian

Session C

5:00-6:30 p.m. (Meeting Suite 3)

(see Session #43 – 1:40 p.m.)

Special Sessions

71. Civil War and the American Nineteenth Century: Rupture and Representation

5:00-6:30 p.m. and Saturday, November 6th, 8:30-4:45 p.m. (Meeting Suite 4)

Chair: Kathleen Diffley, University of Iowa
Moderator: Jane E. Schultz, Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis

Session A: A Man and a Brother?: Self Made Americans

5:00-6:30 p.m.

1. "The Rebellious Spirit of Enslaved Humanity": The Transnational Imagination of the African American 1848
Benjamin Fagan, University of Virginia

2. "Do Like Free People": Literacy Education for Freedmen and Women
Rebecca Entel, Cornell College

3. "Furrows in the Slates": Northern Teachers' Depictions of Freedmen's-School Students
Christopher Hager, Trinity College

4. Invisibility and the Representation of Postbellum Black Women's Leadership, or the Case of Olivia America Davidson Washington, Co-Founder of Tuskegee Normal School
Caroline Gebhard, Tuskegee University

Session B: War into Words: Wartime Audacity

Saturday, November 6th, 8:30-10:00 a.m.

5. "A beehive on swarming day": Lois Bryan Adams and the Domestic Bustle of Civil War Washington
Eve Rosenbaum, University of Iowa

6. Natural Nationhood, North and South
Timothy Sweet, West Virginia University

7. "Who here forecasteth the event?": Weathering the News in US Civil War Poetry
Eliza Richards, University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill

8. The Color of Quaintness: Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Black Song, and American Union
Jeremy Wells, Allegheny College

Session C: Reconstruction's Pictures: Page and Stage

Saturday, November 6th, 10:15-11:45 a.m.

9. "Getting the Bodies of Boys into Order": Nationhood and the Wounded Body in Louisa May Alcott's Hospital Sketches
Lacey Worth, University of Iowa

10. Old Times There: The Land We Love and Re-inventing the South
Kathleen Diffley, University of Iowa

11. Praig's Prospectus and Prints: Civil War Chromos and New Nationalism
Barbaranne Liakos, Smithsonian American Art Museum

12. "Poor Tom Still a Slave": The 1869 and 1876 Playscripts of Uncle Tom's Cabin
Anna Stewart, University of Texas-Austin

Session D: Recollecting the Past: Shaping Collective Memory

Saturday, November 6th, 1:30-3:00 p.m.

13. Anthologizing the Situation of Confederate Literature
Coleman Hutchison, University of Texas-Austin

14. Tom Sayer's Bullet: Mark Twain and Modern War Memory
Samuel Graber, Valparaiso University

15. De-Anthologizing Ambrose Bierce: A New Look at "Shiloh" and "Resaca"
Martin T. Buinicki and David M. Owens, Valparaiso University

Session E: New and Noteworthy: Mary Chesnut's Civil War Epic by Julia A. Stern

Saturday, November 6th, 3:15-4:45 p.m.

17. Commentary
Sarah Gardner, Mercer University

18. Commentary
Caroline Gebhard, Tuskegee University

19. Author's Response
Julia Stern, Northwestern University

72. Remembering Terror

5:00-6:30 p.m. (Convention Center Room 24 A/B)

1. "Terrorists, I Mean People": Parsing the Language of Terror from Haymarket to 9/11
Mark Cassello, Indiana University

2. "A New '93": Ghosts of Terror in the Paris Commune of 1871
Dominica S. Chang, Lawrence University

3. A Compassionate Act of Terror: Emma Goldman, Alexander Berkman, and the Attentat
H. Louise Davis, Miami University, Ohio and Scott Henkel, State University of New York at Binghamton

Associated Organizations

73. Society for the Study of Midwestern Literature

Session B

5:00-6:30 p.m. (Convention Center Room 24 C)

(see Session #60 – 3:20 p.m.)

Special Sessions

74. German Women Writers

Session B

5:00-6:30 p.m. (Convention Center Room 23 C)

(see Session #61 – 3:20 p.m.)

Permanent Sections

75. Drama
Session B

5:00-6:30 p.m. (Convention Center Room 22 A)

(see Session #62 – 3:20 p.m.)

76. History of Critical Reception

Session B

5:00-6:30 p.m. (Convention Center Room 22 B)

(see Session #63 – 3:20 p.m.)

Special Sessions

77. Comparative Terror/Comparative Security

Session B

5:00-6:30 p.m. (Convention Center Room 22 C)

(see Session #64 – 3:20 p.m.)

Workshops

78. Rendering Service

5:00-6:30 p.m. (Regency Ballroom C)

Chair: Elizabeth Klaver, Southern Illinois Univeristy
Format: Roundtable

1. The Politics of Time Release
Craig Dionne, Eastern Michigan University

2. Service Perils of the Assistant Professor
Richard Glejzer, Marlboro College

3. Women and Service
Elizabeth Klaver, Southern Illinois Univeristy

Special Sessions

79. Representing Terror

5:00-6:30 p.m. (Convention Center Room 21 B)

1. Translating "Terror" and Conflict Resolution in Latin America
Andres Aluma-Cazorla, Northern Illinois University

2. The Representation of War in Contemporary Quebec Theatre
Raija Koski, King's University College at the University of Western Ontario

3. Fear of the Sacred: Friar Francisco Ximénez and the Maya Quiché Creation Stories
Néstor I. Quiroa, Wheaton College

Permanent Sections

80. Popular Culture

Session C

5:00-6:30 p.m. (Convention Center Room 21 C)

(see Session #54 – 1:40 p.m.)

Special Events

81. President’s Reception

6:30-7:30 p.m. (Regency Ballroom A)

Complimentary wine and hors d’oeuvres, cash bar, hosted by the 2010 M/MLA President Richard Glejzer.

82. President’s Keynote Address

7:30-8:30 p.m. (Regency Ballroom B)

W.J.T. Mitchell, “Cloning Terror: The War of Images, 9-11 to the Present”

W. J. T. Mitchell is the Gaylord Donnelley Distinguished Service Professor of English and Art History at the University of Chicago. He is editor of the interdisciplinary journal, Critical Inquiry, a quarterly devoted to critical theory in the arts and human sciences. A scholar and theorist of media, visual art, and literature, Mitchell is associated with the emergent fields of visual culture and iconology (the study of images across the media). He is known especially for his work on the relations of visual and verbal representations in the context of social and political issues. Under his editorship, Critical Inquiry has published special issues on public art, psychoanalysis, pluralism, feminism, the sociology of literature, canons, race and identity, narrative, the politics of interpretation, postcolonial theory, and many other topics. He has been the recipient of numerous awards including the Guggenheim Fellowship and the Morey Prize in art history given by the College Art Association of America. In 2003, he received the University of Chicago's prestigious Faculty Award for Excellence in Graduate Teaching. His publications include: Cloning Terror: The War of Images, September 11 to Abu Ghraib (2010); "The Pictorial Turn," Artforum, March 1992; "What Do Pictures Want?" October, Summer 1996; What Do Pictures Want? (2005); The Last Dinosaur Book: The Life and Times of a Cultural Icon (1998); Picture Theory (1994); Art and the Public Sphere (1993); Landscape and Power (1992); Iconology (1987); The Language of Images (1980); On Narrative (1981); and The Politics of Interpretation (1984).