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Loyola University Chicago

Modern Languages and Literatures

Courses Taught

Arabic 101

This course is designed for BEGINNERS of Arabic. The purpose of this course, the first of a four-sequence program, is for learners to develop a basic facility in Modern Standard Arabic (MSA) in the following areas: speaking and listening and reading (both aloud and for comprehension) and writing. In addition, learners will be exposed to an Arabic colloquial dialect (Damascene) as well as to cultural aspects of the Arab world. The class will in-shaa’a-llaah be conducted mostly in Arabic. Students are expected to have reached a novice mid-to novice high proficiency by the end of the course displaying varying levels of control of a lexicon consisting of  approximately 225-250 standard and colloquial Arabic words and important phrases/expressions for polite interaction with speakers of Arabic.

Textbook used: Alif Baa, An introduction to Arabic letters and sounds by Brustad, Al-Batal, & Al-Tonsi (Third Edition).

 

Arabic 102

The purpose of this course, the second of four-course sequence Arabic program, is for learners to continue to focus on an active functional use of vocabulary to help in developing speaking, listening, reading comprehension, and writing skills in rich cultural contexts. The class will in-shaa’a-llaah be conducted mostly in Arabic incorporating modern standard Arabic and the use of one dialect, Damascene, reflecting the linguistic behavior of educated native speakers of Arabic in the Arab world. Students are expected to have reached solid novice high to low intermediate by end of the course. Students are expected to have acquired the ability to speak about themselves and their environment and sustain conversations on daily life topics, to read and write simple authentic texts on diverse topics connected to daily life, and a strong genera understanding of cultural aspects of the Arab world.

Textbook used: Al-Kitaab fii Tacallum al-cArabiyya with DVDs, Part One, by Brustad, Al-Batal, & Al-Tonsi (Third Edition).

 

Arabic 103

The purpose of this course, the third of four-course sequence Arabic program, is for learners to continue to focus on an active functional use of vocabulary activated in classroom to help in developing speaking, listening, reading comprehension, and writing skills in rich cultural contexts incorporating modern standard Arabic and the use of one dialect, Damascene, reflecting the linguistic behavior of educated native speakers of Arabic in the Arab world. The course is designed to help students initiate and sustain simple social interactions about their immediate environment, create with language simple oral and written authentic texts on familiar topics without using a dictionary, and handle simple situations on familiar topics with a mix of formal and informal Arabic. Students continue to strengthen and improve their intermediate level proficiency.

Textbook used: Al-Kitaab fii Tacallum al-cArabiyya with DVDs, Part One, by Brustad, Al-Batal, & Al-Tonsi (Third Edition).

 

Arabic 104

The purpose of this course is for learners to build a solid foundation in the intermediate level of functional use of Arabic developing speaking, listening, reading comprehension, and writing skills in rich cultural contexts.  The active learning pedagogical methods will help empower the learners’ ownership of the learning process through using the vocabulary and structure in contexts relevant to their lives. The class will in-shaa’a-llaah be conducted mostly in Arabic incorporating modern standard Arabic and a little use of one dialect, Damascene, attempting to reflect the linguistic behavior of educated native speakers of Arabic in the Arab world.  The course is meant to be challenging pushing you to a greatest potential and not frustrating. The course intends to help students get connected and be aware of need to service the outer community through group projects that brings together a classroom community effort.  Building on the previous outcomes of Arabic 103, students are expected to have acquired the ability to speak about themselves and their environment and sustain conversations on daily life topics, to read and write simple authentic texts on diverse topics connected to daily life, and a strong genera understanding of cultural aspects of the Arab world.

Arabic Literature in translation (Lit 238)

Please note that this course description below applies only professor Abbadi’s course offered during summer.

The course examines some of the radical changes that profoundly found its voice and echo in Arabic literature as examined through the lenses of the writers from different historical and geographical parts of the Middle East.  The course offers a survey of some distinguished writers and their work as they  portray a world that grapples with issues related to modernity challenges of tradition, changing gender roles and the family, the individual and the state, and the impact of regional conflicts on social, economic, and political aspects of the Middle East. Weekly film screening and analysis will accompany the list of readings to help students in establishing a more round picture of issues raised through the readings.

Films to be screened are (titles subject to change):

  1. Reel Bad Arabic by Jack Shaheen
  2. One Thousand one Nights, a historical perspective
  3. A Female Cabby in Sidi Bel-Abbes by Belkacem Hadjadj
  4. Four women of Egypt by Tahani Rached
  5. Fertile Memory by Michel Khalifi
  6. Alone with War by Danielle Arbid

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