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Loyola University Chicago

Quinlan School of Business

Faces of Family Business Leadership

Thursday, Oct. 2, 2014 • 8 am–4:30 pm

Hyatt Lodge at Hamburger University

2815 Jorie Blvd.

Oak Brook, IL

Join us October 2 for the Loyola Family Business Center’s Fall Conference: Faces of Family Business Leadership. Give your family members a boost as we explore some of the most important facets of leadership, and the various ways it shows up in families and family businesses. Check out the agenda below for a more in-depth look at our keynotes and breakout sessions (you can choose which you plan to attend ahead of time). We encourage you to maximize this experience by inviting multiple family members to attend a variety of breakouts.  This is one conference that’s not to be missed.  We look forward to seeing you and your family in October!

Register by August 22 for Early Bird Pricing.

General Sessions

Faces of Family Business Leadership


    

     Andrew Keyt

     Executive Director,

     Loyola Family Business Center

 

 

Leadership is the cornerstone of success in a family business. Truly great leaders are those who lead by example. They show vulnerability, express forgiveness and empower others. Where are the great leaders in your family business? How are leadership skills passed on from one generation to the next? Who are your undiscovered leaders, and how do you encourage them to step forward? Join Andrew Keyt as he sets the stage for the day ahead and explores the many faces of family business leaders.

Key takeaways:

The Starfish and the Spider

 

     Ori Brafman

     Author

 

 

 

Cut off a spider’s leg, it’s crippled. Cut off a starfish’s leg, it grows a new one, and the old leg can grow into an entirely new starfish. Join author Ori Brafman as he explores the two types of businesses: traditional “spiders,” which have a rigid hierarchy and top-down leadership, and revolutionary “starfish,” which rely on the power of peer relationships. Find out what happens when starfish take on spiders, and how established companies and institutions, from IBM to Intuit to the U.S. government, are also learning how to incorporate starfish principles to achieve success.

Key takeaways:

Breakout Sessions

In-Laws, Not Outlaws

 

Stephanie Dickson

Director of Sales and Business Development,

McCloud Services

 

 

 

Paul Lacroix

After Market Account Manager,

Midtronics

 

 

In-laws are major players in so many family businesses. While they often face their own set of challenges, there’s no doubt they bring value, and a wide array of skills, to the family business table.  Join Stephanie Dickson and Paul Lacroix as they share their experiences working for their spouse’s family business.

Key takeaways:

Sibling & Cousin Teams: Making it Work

Cybelle Egan,

Little Rapids Corp.

Bailey Egan Cloudman,

Little Rapids Corp.

 

    

     Lance Wahl

     Director of Sales and Marketing,

     Wahl Clipper Corp.

 

 

Every family business knows that as the family tree grows, so do the number of owners. Complexity will inevitably increase from one generation to the next. Join Cybelle Egan and Bailey Egan Cloudman, and Lance Wahl as they share their family’s stories of sibling and cousin leadership, and what it takes to become a high-functioning, collaborative team. 

Key takeaways:

Leading from the Fishbowl

Carlos Arango

Trust Advisor, Little Rapids Corp.

When the unexpected happens in a family business, family members are often thrust into leadership positions without suitable, or planned preparation. In this session, Little Rapid’s Carlos Arango shares his experience of his unanticipated assumption to board member and family governance leader, and the steps he and his family took to support, and prepare him for excellence.

Key takeaways:

The Non-Family Executive Leader

 

 

     Jim James

     Chairman and CEO,

     IDEAL Industries

 

Many non-family leaders view the family business through an objective lens – one that’s sharp, insightful and without emotion. Join non-family CEO, Jim James, as he shares what it was like going from public company to family business, and how the family’s vision and values have been instrumental in the growth and success of the company.

Key takeaways:

Wrap Up: Key Learnings & Action Steps

Revisit the day’s most important findings and personally commit to implementing three action items in the months ahead.

 

Register by Ausgust 22 for Early Bird Pricing.

Loyola

Quinlan School of Business · 820 N. Michigan Ave., Chicago, IL 60611
Phone: 312.915.7057 · quinlan@luc.edu

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