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Loyola University Chicago

John Felice Rome Center

ClSt 206 Art of Ancient Greece

Summer 2013 - Intersession

Department of Classical Studies

Loyola University Chicago/John Felice Rome Center

 

Classical Studies 206 (formerly 306):  The Art of the Ancient Greeks

JFRC Intersession I, 2013                                                                         B.M. Lavelle

 

Course Syllabus  (Draft #1[1])

 

This course is an introduction to the art and archaeology of the ancient Greeks from the Bronze Age (c. 3000 BCE) to the Hellenistic period (first century BCE). It focuses specifically on major developments in ancient Greek architecture, sculpture, pottery and painting.  Students will learn what is actually to be seen, comprehended and appreciated by studying art in Greek museums and archaeological sites.  They will study the “texts” of individual pieces, while maintaining a sense and grasp of overall form and composition, as well as how individual examples figure in trends, evolutions, and otherwise in their contexts.  Students will thus come to understand how the parts and the whole work together to comprise art. 

            We are very fortunate in this class to be able to visit actual works (or copies of works) of Greek art in museums or in situ.

 

Learning Outcomes:  Knowledge and Skills Areas

-          Students will learn to interpret selected examples of ancient Greek art, including   painting, sculpture, architecture, and other types from the Bronze Age to the Hellenistic period in light of their aesthetic and cultural values and precedents.

-          They will focus in on the details of examples, what is actually to be seen as the “text” of individual pieces, while maintaining their sense and grasp of overall form and composition, as well as how individual examples figure in their immediate and extended contexts. 

-          Students will come to understand that art even in the rather different culture of the Greeks is yet a communication that reflects the desire of artists to portray the truths of the human condition and environment in aesthetic ways. 

-          They will also learn that art is inimitably tied to audience, its time and place, and so that it is a representation of social, psychological, political, intellectual, cultural and other topics and concerns.

-         Students will develop a better sense of aesthetics and aesthetic appreciation and so understand more about art, ancient and modern.

 

REQUIRED TEXTS:

J. G. Pedley, Greek Art and Archaeology, 5th edition (Prentice-Hall:  2011).

 

HIGHLY RECOMMENDED:

R. Barber and J. Flower, Blue Guide:  Greece (Norton:  1996).

 

EVALUATION CATEGORIES/WEIGHTING:                  GRADING:

Short Reports                                  15%                         90-100  A      72-74 C+    

Talking Points/Questions                 5%                           87-89    A-     68-71 C

Journal                                              15%                           83-86    B+    65-67 C-

Mid-term                                           25%                           78-82    B      62-64 D+

Final                                                  30%                          75-77    B-     58-61 D

Personal summary                           10%                                                      -57 (let’s not go there!)

Short Reports:      

Students will be assigned very short reports of about one (1) page on a particular object of Greek art.  Research on the assigned piece is completed and the copy printed (2 copies) before the trip to Greece.  One copy is for the instructor, one for the student.  These can be rendered in outline form.  See Report Assignments (end of syllabus)

 

Talking Points/Questions:

Students will be assigned one (1) set of talking points and questions for a different art object from the one they are assigned to report on.  The student will cite three (3) things of note about the object assigned and pose two (2) questions about it to the class at the conclusion of the short report. Research on the assigned piece is completed and the copy printed (2 copies) before the trip to Greece.  One copy is for the instructor, one for the student.  These can be rendered in outline form.  See Talking Points-Questions Assignments (end of syllabus).

                         

Journal:  Students will also keep a journal which will be a rendered digest of their daily taken notes.  It may however be enhanced by further comments pertaining to art.  The journal should be a day-by-day summary of Greek art seen, heard about, and then evaluated. Each journal entry is daily and should amount to 5-7 sentences, the font is no less than 12 pt, lines are double spaced. 

The journal will be sent to the instructor electronically or in long-hand version at the time of the mid-term.  The completed journal, which amounts to no less than two and a half (2 ½) pages word-processed may be submitted by email attachment but not later than 72 hours after the final exam (see next). 

 

Personal summary:    Students will submit a one-two (1-2) page (word-processed) summary of their experiences in the class, discussing at least three (3) significant  features specifically attached to three (3) significant art-objects.  This will be submitted at the end of the session but not later than 72 hours after the final exam.

                                     

Mid-term and Final examinations: 

There will be one midterm on June 25th and a final on June 30th.  The subject-matter will be based upon designated examples of Greek art.  The format of these exams may include illustrations, short answers, and/or essay questions.  Each will last 1.5 hours.

 

EXAMINATIONS MUST BE TAKEN ON THE DATE AND AT THE TIME SPECIFIED.  Due to the brevity of this short course there are no make-ups.

PLAGIARISM/ACADEMIC DISHONESTY: Plagiarism or any other act of academic dishonesty will result minimally in the instructor’s assigning the grade of “F” for the assignment or examination. The instructor may impose a more severe sanction, including a grade of “F” in the course. All instances of academic dishonesty must be reported by the instructor to the chairperson of the department involved, and to the Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences. Please read the full Department and College of Arts and Sciences Statements on Academic Integrity at: www.luc.edu/classicalstudies/academics.shtml#integrity.          

Other Information:

Instructor:                 B. M. Lavelle, Professor

Office Hours:             Anytime but when I’m sleeping, parakalō!

 

 

 

 

 

Department of Classical Studies

Loyola University Chicago/John Felice Rome Center

 

CLST 206:  Art of the Ancient Greeks                             

Summer Intersession I, 2013                                          B. M. Lavelle

 

Itinerary and Schedule

(Draft #1)

 

21 June:    Arrival in Athens:  most in early afternoon

Late afternoon/            walking tour of Kerameikos, Plaka:

early evening:      peripateia of the Akropolis;

                                               Monuments of ancient Athens

                 

Dinner:                TBD

Hotel:                            Athens: Jason Inn
                            12 Assomaton St.
                            Psirri, Thission, 105 53 Athens
                            Tel.: +30 210 32 51 106
                            Fax: +30 210 32 43 132

                            http://www.douroshotels.com/htr.asp?hotel_id=1

 

 22 June:   Morning:              Athens:  National Museum

                                               Minoan frescoes

Greek pottery and pottery painting: 

Geometric to Late to late Classical

Mycenaean art and artifacts

Sculpture:  Archaic to Hellenistic:  kouroi,    

Artemision Zeus, etc.

                                     

Afternoon:           Athens:  Agora and Agora museum (if possible)

                                               Various pieces

 

Early Evening:     Athens:  Akropolis and Akropolis Museum

                                               Akropolis (site):  Parthenon, Erectheion

Sculptures:  korai; sculptures, frieze and metopes

 

Breakfast:            Jason Inn Roof Terrace (what a view!)

Lunch:                 TBD

Dinner:                TBD

Hotel:                            Athens: Jason Inn
                            12 Assomaton st.,
                            Psirri, Thission, 105 53 Athens
                            Tel.: +30 210 32 51 106
                            Fax: +30 210 32 43 132

                            http://www.douros-hotels.com/htr.asp?hotel_id=1

 

23 June:    Morning:              Athens→Mycenae→Nafplio

Mycenae:   Site:  Lion Gate (and wall), Grave circle, Cult rooms, megaron

Mycenae Museum:  artifacts from the 16th to the 11th centuries B.C.E.

 

Afternoon:           Nafplio:       Free time:  Swimming, relaxing

 

Breakfast:            Jason Inn Roof Terrace

Lunch:                 TBD

Dinner:                TBD

Hotel:                            Nafplio: Park Hotel

                            Dervenakion 1, Kolokotroni Square

                            Nafplio

                            Tel: +30 27520 27428

                            Fax: +30 27520 27045 

                            http://www.parknafplio.gr.

 

24 June:    Morning:              Nafplio→Sparta→Karyes→Nafplio

Sparta:  Site:  akropolis, Artemis Orthia 

Museum:  miscellaneous artifacts, “Leonidas”  (possible)

 

Afternoon:           Karyes, Dr. Kopsiafti’s Village (near Sparta)

                            (This is awesome!)

 

Breakfast:           Park Hotel

Lunch:                 TBD

Dinner:                TBD

Hotel:                            Nafplio: Park Hotel

                            Dervenakion 1, Kolokotroni Square

                            Nafplio

                            Tel: +30 27520 27428

                            Fax: +30 27520 27045

                            http://www.parknafplio.gr.

 

 

25 June:    Morning:              Nafplio→Olympia

                                               T. of Apollo Epikouros, Bassai (possible)

 

Afternoon:          Mid-term Exam, 1.5 hrs. (at hotel in Olympia)

                            Free time:  They have a really nice pool here.

 

Breakfast:            Park Hotel

Lunch:                 TBD

Dinner:                TBD

Hotel:                            Olympia: Hotel Europa

                            Drouva Street

                            27065 Ancient Olympia

                            Tel.:+30 26240 22650

                            Fax: +30 26240 23166 

                            http://www.hoteleuropa.com

                                                       

26 June:     Morning:              Olympia:   Site:T. Zeus, T. Hera, Stadium

Olympia Museum:  Temple sculptures, Nike,       Hermes and Dionysos, Zeus & Ganymede

 

                   Afternoon:            Olympia→Delphi (Arachova) (via Rhion-

Antirhion)  (Long ride:  be prepared!)

 

Coffee break:       Nafpaktos?

 

Breakfast:            Hotel Europa

Lunch:                 TBD

Dinner:                TBD

Hotel:                            Delphi:  Hotel Acropole
                            13 Filellinon Street, 330 54 Fokida
                            Tel: + (30) 22650 82675

                            Fax: + (30) 22650 83171       

                            http://www.delphi.com.gr

 

 27 June:   Morning:              DelphiSite:  treasuries, T. Apollo, stadium

Delphi Museum:  treasury sculptures, charioteer, Kleobis and Biton, etc.

Thebes:  town and museum (possible)

 

                   Afternoon:            Delphi→Thebes→Athens

                                     

Breakfast:            Hotel Acropole

Lunch:                 TBD

Dinner:                TBD

Hotel:                            Athens: Jason Inn
                            12 Assomaton st.,
                            Psirri, Thission, 105 53 Athens
                            Tel.: +30 210 32 51 106
                            Fax: +30 210 32 43 132

                            http://www.douros-hotels.com/htr.asp?hotel_id=1

 

28 June:     Morning:              Athens:  Kerameikos, Temple of Olympian Zeus

                                              

                   Afternoon (earlier):         Athens→Brauron

 

Afternoon (later): Free:  swim, relax

Breakfast:            Jason Hotel

Lunch:                 TBD

Dinner:                Mare Nostrum

Hotel:                            Mare Nostrum - Thalasso
                            Vrauronas Ave 190

                            03 Vraurona Attika
                            Tel.: 22940-71000
                            Fax: 22940-47700
                            http://www.mare-nostrum.gr/

 

29 June:     Morning:              Temple of Poseidon, Sounion (?)

                                               Brauron:  Artemis sanctuary, Museum (possible)

Afternoon:           Free: swim, relax

                   Evening:              singing, dancing?

                  

Breakfast:            Mare Nostrum - Thalasso

Lunch:                          TBD

Dinner:                Mare Nostrum

Hotel:                            Mare Nostrum - Thalasso
                            Vrauronas Ave 190

                            03 Vraurona Attika
                            Tel.: 22940-71000
                            Fax: 22940-47700
                            http://www.mare-nostrum.gr/

 

30 June:    Morning:              Final Exam (early, early morning) (in hotel).

Departure for airport, etc.

 

Breakfast:            Mare Nostrum - Thalasso

 

Short Reports

 

Short report Assignment Template

Short Reports benefit the whole class.  Your assigned object is “yours” and you are the class expert for it.  You will be instructing “your class” in what you know better than (almost) anybody else.  Your report needs to be clean, clear, and to the point.  It  must include the following and last no longer than 15 minutes. 

 

Title of Object:              What is the object actually called?

Findspot/Finder:           Where was it found?  Who found it?

Material:                        What is it made of?  Was it/is it painted?  If so, with what?

Style:                             What is its style? (E.g., Geometric, Late Archaic, Classical, etc.)

Technique:                    How is it rendered (E.g., frieze, fresco, etc.)?

Original or copy?           Which of two?  How do we know?

Date:                             What are its exact or approximate dates? 

Dimensions:                   If it’s two dimensions, how high and wide is it?  If three, how high, wide & deep.

Description:                   Exactly what does the object look like?  Be detailed. Is it a representation of a mythical character or story?  Is there a story that goes with it?  Any other important/outstanding/unique things to note about it?

Message:                        What is the artist obviously trying to convey and how does she/he do that?

Interpretation:              What is YOUR interpretation of the object?  What does it mean?  Be as objective as possible!

Bibliography:                 You must include at least three (3) sound references with your report.  These can be found at either the Loyola IC or the JFRC IC.

                            (“Wikipedia” is NOT a sound reference.  Books are best by far.)

 

Don’t forget to make two (2) printed out copies of your report, one to give to me at the time of your report and one for you to read from.   Be sure that your report is completed and ready to be given before you arrive in Greece.  There won’t be any further opportunity on the road for you to do it. I won’t except anything but a printed out copy.  (No handwritten reports will be accepted.)

 

Talking Points and Questions Instructions

In addition to your report, you will also be responsible for a short set of talking points and questions for objects specifically assigned to you.  The number of talking points are three (3) and the number of questions two (2).   You will be asked to give them right after the assigned report. 

 

For this, at the end of another’s report, you will want to bring to the attention of the class three (3) of the most important points to be made about your assigned object.  You will want to ask the class two (2) significant questions about the object.  The latter should stimulate thought about the object and may certainly introduce comparisons with other objects.

 

Remember to make two (2) printed out copies of your talking points/questions, one to give to me and one for you to read from.   Be sure that your talking points and questions are completed and ready to be given before you arrive in Greece.  There won’t be any further opportunity on the road to do it.  I won’t except anything but a printed out copy.  (No handwritten copies will be accepted.)



[1]

    Some minor changes may be made to the schedule and itinerary.  You will be updated should that occur.

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