I had to throw out my play book

By Lindsay Blauvelt, SOC Website Reporter

Lauren Krause left Loyola in 2010 with her sights set on broadcast journalism. After some refocusing, Krause had a new goal; find a job.

Krause applied to hundreds of news stations, even accepting the fact that she might have to move out of Chicago to work in broadcast. However, when a marketing position at the Chicago Tribune came her way, Krause went for it.

“I didn’t plan for it,” Krause said. “I took the job in advertising hoping it would lead to something else, but not knowing for certain. So with a combination of hard work and timing this role opened up.”

After a year working in advertising, a position opened up at Trib Nation, the blog-style offshoot of the Chicago Tribune. It wasn’t a broadcast job, in fact the position of Trib Nation Coordinator didn’t even have strict parameters on what type of media Krause would be working with on a daily basis, but she took the risk and it paid off.

Krause said, “Every day is different; each month I’m adding a new responsibility or a new project. So my role is just constantly evolving, which I think is actually really exciting for young journalists. Larger markets are creating jobs that are more applicable to young students and I’m a testament to that.”

Krause has many responsibilities ranging from dealing with reader responses to writing articles for the web. She said that her ability to adapt was not only a skill she learned at Loyola, but also a key component in getting her job.

“I learned that I had to throw my playbook out the window and just role with it,” Krause said. “If I hadn’t I wouldn’t be where I am today.”

Krause said that her willingness to ditch her original plans was supplemented by a hearty dose of hard work and networking.

She said, “I worked hard for a year in advertising so when my current job opened, I made really good contacts so they had great things to say about me when I applied. It made it easier to have people that knew me.”

After her experience with the job market, Krause said that she thinks the best thing students can to do prepare for the job hunt is to leave their options open.

“You have to realistic about the job market and your talents,” Krause said. “I think be flexible in what you can do, stretch your skills out to make you more applicable to other jobs and just be creative. Other avenues could lead to a writing role, even if it means taking something that isn’t traditional.”

Her own choice to take an untraditional job in journalism proved to be beneficial, if not preferable to a more structured role.

She said, “My goal is to constantly keep developing over time. So any time I get discouraged I just think ‘tomorrow is going to be different.’”