Loyola University Chicago

Student Transitions and Outreach

Division of Student Academic Services

Loyola Seminar

The Loyola Seminar courses (UNIV 102) are intended to provide Loyola University Chicago's first-year students with an academic experience that exposes them to active and collaborative learning in a supportive environment. Courses are taught by full-time faculty and other leaders on campus. The one semester, one credit-hour, course meets weekly for 50 minutes with additional activities outside of scheduled class time to assist in community development and the integration of curricular and co-curricular learning.

Seminars are offered within several of Loyola's Major areas of study, exposing students to the discipline as a possible Major. Importantly, no background knowledge in the topic area is needed for students, as they are encouraged to explore new areas of interest.

Why take a Loyola Seminar?

  • Continue striving for first-year success in this small, seminar-style class;
  • Get to know a faculty member from one of your areas of interest;
  • Gain more exposure to the Ignatian approach to learning: experience, critical reflection and action;
  • Explore a major field of study while studying a unique and intriguing topic;
  • Participate in a class that lets you ask questions about your academic transition to college;
  • Deepen your connection to Loyola University Chicago;
  • Stay engaged and excited about your education!

Loyola Seminar Topics—Spring 2017

 

006 FYRE - ENVS

Brian Ohsowski
Friday, 9:20–10:10 a.m., Sullivan Center

FYRE

 

007 Vulnerability and Failure: The Art of Being Brave and Trying Again

Elisabeth Bayley
Wednesday, 10:25–11:15 a.m., Sullivan Center

Vulnerability is part of being human. The reality of this vulnerability is heightened when we fail at something. We begin to ask ourselves: How will I cope with this failure? How will I manage to get back up and try again? In this course we will explore the ideas of vulnerability, failure, and being brave. Through the use of the work of Brene Brown and short pieces of fiction this course will serve to look at these very important and ever present realities in our lives, and further, explore the different ways we respond to them.

 

008 FYRE - Math

Laurie Jordan
Monday, 10:25–11:15 p.m., Sullivan Center

FYRE

 

010 FYRE - Biology

Rodney Dale, Thomas Sanger
Monday, 10:25–11:15 p.m., Sullivan Center

FYRE

 

011 Transgender

Pam Caughie
Monday, 1:40-2:30 p.m., Sullivan Center 

The twentieth century is often called “the century of sex.”  In the early decades, the New Woman, the birth control movement, sex manuals, the increasing visibility of homosexuality, and the new science of sexology, all contributed to this moniker. Sex and gender became more and more central to identity, to scientific research, and to literature and the arts. This seminar will discuss this history in order to place recent media attention to transgender (e.g., Vanity Fair’s spread on Caitlyn Jenner, Amazon’s “Transparent,” the 2015 film “The Danish Girl”) and recent political debates (e.g., transgender restrooms) in a historical context.   

 

012 Based on a True Story

Nadine Kenney Johnstone
Friday, 10:25 a.m.–11:15 a.m., Sullivan Center

Why do we love true stories so much? In this class, we will watch live literature performances, reality TV clips, and movies based on true events. We will also share our own true stories and discuss why true tales are so captivating.

 

013 FYRE - Neuroscience

Raymond Dye
Monday, 2:45 p.m.–3:35 p.m., Sullivan Center

FYRE

 

017 FYRE - Physics

Laura Brentner
Wednesday, 2:45 p.m.–3:35 p.m., Sullivan Center

FYRE

 

018 SDMA- 

Qortne Hutchings, Naseeb Bhangal
Tuesday, 11:30 a.m.–12:20 p.m., Sullivan Center

SDMA

 

020 FYRE - ENVS

Bree Sines
Thursday, 9:20–10:10 a.m., Sullivan Center

FYRE

 

021 Black Lives (Still) Matter

Aurora Chang
Tuesday, 1:00–1:50 p.m., Sullivan Center

The now infamous hashtag #BlackLivesMatter isn’t the beginning of a movement, but a continuation of an ongoing struggle.  In this course, we will explore the #BlackLivesMatter movement in the context of Chicago schooling and Black youth.  Drawing from the success of last year’s seminar, students will research topics, attend events, hear guest speakers (including UNIV 102 BLM alumni), dissect multimedia texts,  develop a proposal to present at the Black Lives Matter Conference (2017), and engage in readings and discussion related to the #BlackLivesMatter movement. Throughout the semester, we will actively build community, nurturing our collective passion for social justice in the lives of Black students and ultimately, all marginalized students.   

 

023 FYRE - Chem

Jake Ciszek, Hee Yeon Cho, James Devery, Dan Killelea, Wei-Tsung Lee, Martina Schmeling
Friday, 1:40–2:30 p.m., Sullivan Center

FYRE - Chem

 

024 FYRE - Biology

Madeline Keleher
Tuesday, 2:30–3:20 p.m., Sullivan Center

FYRE - Bio

 

027 FYRE - Chem

Patrick Daubenmire
Thursday, 2:30–3:20 p.m., Sullivan Center

FYRE

 

028 The Liars Club

Paige Warren
Friday, 2:45–3:35 p.m., Sullivan Center

Little white lies. Misrepresentation. Deception. Omission. Bluffing. B.S. If the truth is out there, what is it and who decides? Who, if anyone, can we trust? Through exploring fiction, memoir, creative non-fiction, unreliable narrators and more, this course will strive for honesty- if there even is such a thing.

 

029 Weird Poetry

Meghan Forajter
Friday, 2:45 p.m.–3:35 p.m.

Poetry isn’t boring! This course will introduce students to ideas in poetry by looking at weird poems, strange forms, and exciting production methods. Students will then connect these poetic ideas to other areas of communication in their academic and personal lives. Weird Poetry will include hands-on activities where students create their own poems and creative writing pieces.  008 Latinos in the US Media

 

031 FYRE - Comp Sci

Mark Albert

Tuesday, 4:00–4:50 p.m., Sullivan Center

FYRE - 

 

032 Diversity

Veronica Wilson
Tuesday, 5:00 p.m.–5:50 p.m., Sullivan Center

 

033 Pre-Law

Furqan Mohammed
Tuesday, 6:30 p.m.–7:20 p.m., Dumbach Hall

 

034 Introduction To Research

Kevin Kaufmann
Tuesday, 7:30 p.m.–8:20 p.m., Cuneo

Undergraduate research is a proven method of high impact learning across academic disciplines. The question is: How to get started? That course will answer that question.  Starting with the initial idea of a research question to finishing with a research proposal, students will be engaged in the development of a research project. 

 

036 FYRE - Stats

Earvin Balderama
Tuesday, 4:00–4:50 p.m., Sullivan Center

FYRE - 

 

039 Diversity-

Joe Saucedo
Monday, 5:00–5:50 p.m., Sullivan Center

 

040 Sex, Secrets and Silence

Sherrie Weller
Monday, 1:40–2:30 p.m., Sullivan Center

Memoirs most often reflect and explore specific individual experience located in a larger societal and historical context. In this class, we will read and discuss a sampling of contemporary memoirs written by women that We will consider how societal attitudes towards gender roles and expectations relate to the taboo nature and cultural silencing of women’s sexuality and reproductive issues.  Some authors may include: Maxine Hong-Kingston, bell hooks, Jeanette Winterson, Kathryn Harrison, Dorothy Allison, Alison Bechdel, Marjane Satrapi, Anne Fessler, and Alice Sebold.

041, 042 and 043 Intro to Healthcare Professions

James Johnson
Tuesday, 5-5:50, 6-6:50 and 7-7:50., Sullivan Center

This class is an opportunity to explore and think more deeply about health professions. Our course materials, guest speakers, and on-site activities will offer a range of information on different health professions and opportunities to engage with various issues facing health care professionals today. You will also have an opportunity to reflect on your interests and aspirations, and examine a specific health profession in greater depth.

 

047 Medical Mysteries

Amy Kessel
Thursday 4:00–4:50 p.m., Sullivan Center

Medical diagnosis is much like solving a mystery; the body and its systems-as well as the social, economic, and cultural contexts in which the body lives-are texts that require close analysis and skills of detection to determine the causes of disease. In this course we will explore tales of puzzling diagnoses that reveal mysteries of illness and health. We will follow in the steps of some of the cleverest medical detectives in history as they solve baffling cases and track down diabolical diseases. Our short readings will include actual case studies, medical history, and intriguing fiction. We will also be investigating these mysteries as they are portrayed in television shows and films. In a session with a "standard patient" (an actor who portrays a patient to test medical students) we will try our own hand at solving a diagnostic mystery. Attendance and three short (2-page) response papers required.

048 Gannon - Research Matters

Sarah Hallet
Monday, 3:50–4:40 p.m., Cuneo Hall

What is research? How is it done in different fields? How does it relate to social justice? These are some of the questions we will address in this one-credit, interactive course that looks at research focusing on the intersection of women, leadership, and social justice.

 

049 Justice, Mercy, and Mass Incarceration

Don Stemen
Thursday, 2:30–3:20 p.m., Sullivan Center

This course will provide students with an understanding of the meaning and impact of mass incarceration in the United States. The course will explore a number of issues raised in Just Mercy, including the intersection of race, class, politics, and policy; the disparate impact of crime and justice on minorities; and the over-reliance on incarceration as a response to crime.  It will push students to explore ways to ensure a just system, to create a more compassionate system, and to advocate for a criminal justice system that recognizes the need for social justice.

 

050 Diversity-

Robyn Mallet
Tuesday, 1:00–1:50 p.m., Sullivan Center

The course will consist of readings, videos, focused discussions, individual reflection, short quizzes, and writing assignments. This course is designed to introduce first year students to the concept of how privilege, power, and oppression shape ourselves and perceptions of others. Students will engage in self-reflection to increase self-awareness. This class will consider how we may maximize the capacity for understanding how ourselves and others are shaped by and operate within the larger social system. Students will be exposed to the basic terms and concepts related to the course topics. We emphasize the concept of intersectionality (multiple dimensions of human identity) throughout the course. Students will explore their own cultural identities, values, and biases in a number of areas including: race/ethnicity, social class, gender and sexual identity, and immigration status. 

 

052 FYRE - Chem

Chad Eichman, Dan Becker, Dan Graham, Dali Liu, Paul Chiarelli, Miguel Ballicora
Friday, 1:40–2:30 p.m., Sullivan Center

FYRE - Chem

 

054 Stories of the Underground Railroad

Amy Kessel
Tuesday, 4:00–4:50 p.m., Sullivan Center

Chances are that the first stories you ever heard about slavery were tales of the Underground Railroad. The idea of dedicated Abolitionists helping slaves escape to the North through a secret organization appeals strongly to the American imagination. In this course we will examine those imaginings as they appear in children's books, songs, poems, short fiction, film, television, and in two recently (2016) published novels: The Underground Railroad by Colson Whitehead, and Underground Airlines by Ben H. Winters. Throughout the course we will compare these products of the imagination with the historical reality and with our own understandings of race, slavery, and freedom. Attendance and three short (2-page) response papers required.

 

055 Crook County: Crime and Justice in Cook County

David Olson
Tuesday, 10:00 a.m.–10:50 a.m., Sullivan Center

This course will provide students with an understanding of the issues facing the justice system in Cook County, Illinois (Chicago). The course will explore a number of issues raised in Just Mercy, but with a localized focus. These issues include the intersection of politics and policy, the disparate impact of crime and justice on minorities, and the over-reliance on incarceration as a response to crime. 

 

056 Diversity

Bridget Kelly
Thursday, 1–1:50 p.m., WTC Corboy

This course is designed to introduce first year students to the concept of how privilege, power, and oppression shape ourselves and perceptions of others. Students will engage in self-reflection to increase self-awareness. This class will consider how we may maximize the capacity for understanding how ourselves and others are shaped by and operate within the larger social system. Students will be exposed to the basic terms and concepts related to the course topics. We emphasize the concept of intersectionality (multiple dimensions of human identity) throughout the course. Students will explore their own cultural identities, values, and biases in a number of areas including: race/ethnicity, social class, gender and sexual identity, and immigration status.