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Loyola University Chicago

Summer Sessions

CAS Course Descriptions

Listed below are the course descriptions for College of Arts and Sciences Summer Sessions courses.

Anthropology

ANTH 397 Directed Readings in Anthropology (Capstone)
Prerequisite: Permission of chairperson and faculty member
Advanced students develop and complete readings in anthropology, which reflect a sophisticated understanding of the field and further develop an appreciation for particular issues, techniques and or theories in anthropology.

ANTH 398 Independent Study in Anthropology (Capstone)
Prerequisite: Permission of chairperson and faculty member
Individualized program of independent study developed by advanced students who seek to develop and complete a rigorous program, which will synthesize and advance the student's knowledge of anthropological issues.  

ANTH 399 Fieldwork in Anthropology
Prerequisite: Permission of chairperson and faculty member.
Application of anthropological concepts and methods to a specific field situation under the supervision of a faculty member. Students will learn field techniques and data recovery and analysis techniques pertinent to the specific nature of their field experience.

ANTH 399 (Capstone) Fieldwork in Anthropology
Prerequisite: permission of chairperson and faculty member.
Advanced application of anthropological concepts and methods to a specific field situation under the supervision of a faculty member. Students are expected to use and refine field techniques including data recovery, acquisition, and analysis, and to synthesize techniques with theoretical approaches in order to develop a sophisticated understanding of the topic explored.

ANTH 399 Archaeology Field School: Building an Evolutionary Understanding of Place
Please view the course description on the Retreat and Ecology Center's summer page.

Biology

BIOL 101 General Biology I
Fundamental principles of biology including basic chemistry, cell structure and function, energy transformations, evolutionary theory, cellular reproduction and principles of genetics.

BIOL 102 General Biology II
Prerequisite: BIOL 101, 111; co-requisite: BIOL 102 Fundamental principles of biology including diversity of life, environmental and biological diversity, population and community ecology, study of plant structure and function, reproduction and controlling plant growth and development, comparative animal organ systems and mechanism of cell communication.

BIOL 111 General Biology Lab I
Co-requisite: BIOL 101. Complements the lecture material through observation, experimentation, and when appropriate, dissection of representative organisms. Observations will include physical and chemical phenomena as well as the anatomy and physiology of selected organisms. The organisms to be studied will be selected from the kingdoms monera, protista, fungi, plantae and animalia.

BIOL 112 General Biology Lab II
Prerequisite: BIOL 101, 111. Complements the lecture material through observation, experimentation, and when appropriate, dissection of representative organisms. Observations will include physical and chemical phenomena as well as the anatomy and physiology of selected organisms. The organisms to be studied will be selected from the kingdoms monera, protista, fungi, plantae and animalia.

BIOL 242 Human Structure and Function I
Prerequisite: BIOL 102, 112; CHEM 102, 112 or 106. This class includes lecture, laboratory, and demonstrations and focuses on organization of the human body from the cellular to the organismal level. Anatomy of body systems and their physiology related to support and movement (integumentary, skeletal and muscular systems), and integration and control (nervous and endocrine systems). Dissection of representative organs is required. Students will be able to demonstrate knowledge of human anatomy at the microscopic and gross levels. They will be able to correlate structure and function and will have a firm understanding of the organizing principle of human physiology, homeostasis, and explain the role of the nervous and endocrine systems in its maintenance.

BIOL 243 Human Structure and Function II
Pre-requisite: Prerequisites are BIOL 101, 102, 111, 112, BIOL 242; CHEM 101, 102, 111, 112, and BIOL 242. This class includes lecture, laboratory ,and demonstrations. A continuation of BIOL 242. Anatomy of body systems and their physiology related to regulation and maintenance (cardiovascular, lymphatic respiratory, digestive and urinary systems), and reproduction and development (male and female reproductive systems.) Dissection of representative organs is required. Students will be able to demonstrate a comprehensive integrated knowledge and understanding of human anatomy and physiology at all levels.

BIOL 251 Cell Biology
Prerequisites: BIOL 102 & 112 and CHEM 102 & 106 Basic molecular and cellular studies of living organisms, emphasizing the relationships between subcellular structures and biochemical and physiological functions of cells.

BIOL 252 Cell Biology Lab
Prerequisite or corequisite: BIOL 251 Laboratory experiences designed to explore relationships between structure and function of subcellular components. Students will acquire working knowledge of a variety of techniques utilized in the cell biology laboratory.

BIOL 265 Ecology
Prerequisites: BIOL 102 & 112; CHEM 102 or 106. Relationships of organisms to their environment and to each other at the organismal, population and community levels.

BIOL 266 Ecology Lab
Prerequisite or co-requisite: BIOL 265.
Please view the course description on the Retreat and Ecology Center's summer page.

BIOL 282 Genetics
Prerequisites:  BIOL 102, 112 and CHEM 102 or 106.
This course surveys principles and processes of genetic inheritance, gene expression, molecular biology, developmental, quantitative, population, and evolutionary genetics. Students will develop knowledge and awareness of the genetic bases of modern biology. They will understand Mendelian principles of inheritance, chromosome and DNA structure and replication, gene expression, molecular biology, genetic bases of development, and other biological processes, and quantitative, population and evolutionary genetics.

BIOL 283 Genetics Lab
Prerequisite or corequisite:  BIOL 282.
Experiments and demonstrations to illustrate chromosomal structures and transmission, molecular biology, gene linkage, gene frequencies and variation. Students will develop technical skills and ability to interpret data from a variety of types of genetics experiments.

BIOL 296 Introduction to Research
Prerequisites: BIOL 102, 112; Permission of the instructor; Biology Core highly recommended. Students will begin reading the literature in the field of their mentor, conduct experiments designed by the mentor, and give a presentation on their work or studies, in preparation for upper level undergraduate research. Students will develop critical reading skills and become familiar with basic lab techniques in the area of their mentor.

BIOL 302 General Microbiology & Lab
Pre-requisites: BIOL 251 & 282. Fundamental concepts of microbial life and physiology immunology are taught in a lecture and laboratory combination.

BIOL 327 Wetland Ecology
Please view the course description on the Retreat and Ecology Center's summer page.

 

BIOL 352 Mammalian Endocrinology
Prerequisite: BIOL 242 and BIOL 243. Survey of hormones that regulate metabolism, salt and water balance, calcium and phosphorus metabolism, and reproduction; special emphasis on hormonal transduction signals and integration of endocrine systems. Students will develop detailed understanding of how numerous aspects of metabolism are controlled at cellular and systems levels by hormone
action.

BIOL 362 Neurobiology
Prerequisite:  BIOL 251
The purpose of this course is to introduce major principles and concepts of modern neurobiology. An emphasis is placed upon an understanding of the electrophysiology of the neuron and the manner in which groups of neurons are organized into functional nervous systems subserving sensory, motor or integrative functions. Student will gain a solid foundation in nervous system structure and function

BIOL 395 Field Ornithology
This course will cover methods of surveying and collecting data on birds in their natural setting. The main project of the course is to census the birds at the Ecology Campus using different techniques and to examine differences in species diversity across micro-habitats. Students will learn to identify bird species, handle animals, and interpret data using statistics.

BIOL 396 Research Methods in Biology
Permission of Chairperson required. Emphasis on investigation of a biological hypothesis, including literature search and appropriate experimental techniques. Oral presentation and written paper required.

BIOL 397 Senior Honors Thesis
Pre-requisite: Senior status and participation in the Honors program; permission of Chairperson. This course is required for students who seek to graduate with Department Honors in Biology. Students will pursue, under advisement, a research topic that will challenge the individual’s ability and potential to perform an independent investigation, the results of which will be presented in a paper and a poster.

BIOL 398 Internship in Biology
Pre-requisites: 21 hours in Biology; all cognate requirements; letter(s) of recommendation from participating off-campus professional (s) permission of the Chairperson. A supervised field placement intended to give students training and experience in biology obtained outside the campus.

BIOL 399 Individual Study
Directed study of a specific topic under the direction of one of more faculty members. Indicate number of credits for project (1-4 allowed). Consent of the department Chairperson required.

Chemistry

CHEM 101 General Chemistry A
Prerequisites: A satisfactory performance on the Loyola math proficiency test, a year of high school chemistry is recommended or Math 117 with a grade of C- or better. Co-requisite: CHEM 111. This lecture and discussion deals with the development of basic chemical principles. Topics include atomic and molecular structures, states of matter, energetics and stoichiometry of reactions. (For non-chemistry majors and students in the B.A. chemistry program.)

CHEM 111 General Chemistry Laboratory A
Co-requisite: CHEM 101. This laboratory course experimentally illustrates the topics covered in the General Chemistry A.

CHEM 102 General Chemistry B
Prerequisites: CHEM 101 & 111, or 105 and MATH 118 or higher with a grade of C- or better. Co-requisite: 112. This lecture and discussion is a continuation of General Chemistry A. Topics include equilibrium systems, periodic properties and descriptive chemistry.

CHEM 112 General Chemistry Laboratory B
Prerequisites: CHEM 101 & 111; or 105. Co-requisite: 102. This laboratory course experimentally illustrates the topics covered in the General Chemistry B lecture.

CHEM 151 Elementary Physiological Chemistry A Lecture & Lab
Prerequisite: High school chemistry or permission of chairperson. This lecture and laboratory emphasizes the development of basic chemical properties and electron configuration, states of matter, gas laws, stoichiometry and energetics of reactions, aqueous equilibria, the use of radioisotopes in medicine, environmental considerations and an introduction to structure and nomenclature in organic chemistry. Primarily for nursing students.

CHEM 152 Elementary Physiological Chemistry B Lecture & Lab
Prerequisite: CHEM 151. This combined lecture, quiz and laboratory present a survey of organic chemistry including nomenclature and reactions of functional groups followed by a survey of biochemical topics including stereochemistry, carbohydrates, lipids, proteins, nucleic acids, digestion, metabolism, vitamins, hormones and blood. Primarily for nursing students.

CHEM 212  Elementary Quantitative Analysis
Prerequisite: CHEM 106, or 102 and 112. This lecture course provides an introduction to modern analytical quantitative chemistry. Topics include chemical equilibrium, statistical analysis of data as well as modern and classical methods of chemical analysis.

CHEM 214  Elementary Quantitative Analysis Lab
Prerequisite: CHEM 106, or 102 and 112. Pre or co-requisite: CHEM 212. This laboratory course introduces students to classical and modern methods of chemical analysis and teaches wet chemical laboratory techniques.

CHEM 223 Organic Chemistry A
Prerequisites: CHEM 102 & 112, or CHEM 106. Lecture and discussion. First semester of a two semester sequence for non-chemistry majors. A survey of topics including stereochemistry, spectroscopy and fundamental concepts of organic chemistry. Nomenclature, properties and syntheses of aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons, alkyl halides, alcohols and ethers.

CHEM 224 Organic Chemistry B
Prerequisite: CHEM 223 & 225, co-requisite CHEM 226. Continuation of Organic Chemistry A. Organic chemistry of carbonyl compounds, amines, carboxylic acids and their derivatives, carbohydrates, lipids and proteins. For non-chemistry majors.

CHEM 225 Organic Chemistry Laboratory A
Pre- or Co-requisite: CHEM 223. A laboratory course designed to illustrate, through experiments, the topics correspondingly covered in Organic Chemistry A. The experiments acquaint students with the laboratory practices and techniques of organic chemistry, with several involving preparation of known organic compounds. For non-chemistry majors.

CHEM 226 Organic Chemistry Laboratory B
Prerequisite: CHEM 223 & 225, pre- or co-requisite CHEM 224. A laboratory course to illustrate, through experiments, certain topics covered in Organic Chemistry B. The major portion of the laboratory work involves the identification of several relatively simple organic compounds. For non- chemistry majors.

CHEM 361 Survey in Biochemistry
Prerequisite:CHEM 222 or 224 & CHEM 226. This lecture-based class focuses on the structural-functional relationships of proteins, nucleic acids and cell membranes, and metabolic pathways.

Classical Studies

CLST 271 Classical Mythology
Requirement: UCLR 100 for students admitted to Loyola University for Fall 2012 or later.  No requirement for students admitted to Loyola prior to Fall 2012 or those with a declared major or minor in the Department of English, Department of Classical Studies, or Department of Modern Languages and Literatures.

This course focuses on Greek and Roman literature involving myth and how ancient and modern peoples use traditional narratives, characters, images and conceptions to explore, explain, and experiment with ideas about themselves and their surroundings in their historical, social, cultural and intellectual contexts. Students should be able to demonstrate knowledge of the fundamental myths of the ancient Greek and Roman world, their language and possible meanings, and how myth reflected important collective and individual concerns, values, beliefs, and practices then, even as modern myth does now.

 

CLST 272 Heroes and Classical Epics
Requirement: UCLR 100 for students admitted to Loyola University for Fall 2012 or later.  No requirement for students admitted to Loyola prior to Fall 2012 or those with a declared major or minor in the Department of English, Department of Classical Studies, or Department of Modern Languages and Literatures.

This course centers upon the epics of the ancient Mediterranean world, their nature and significance, and, especially, the concepts of heroes and heroism. Students should be able to demonstrate knowledge of ancient epic as a literary genre, what heroes are and why they are featured in epics, and how epics began and evolved to reflect audiences and their social, cultural, political and other concerns, values (such as leadership) beliefs and practices.

CLST 273 Classical Tragedy
Requirement: UCLR 100 for students admitted to Loyola University for Fall 2012 or later.  No requirement for students admitted to Loyola prior to Fall 2012 or those with a declared major or minor in the Department of English, Department of Classical Studies, or Department of Modern Languages and Literatures.

This course introduces students to extant Greek tragic drama, especially through the works of Aeschylus, Sophocles and Euripides. Students should be able to demonstrate knowledge of plot, characters and themes in Greek drama; understanding of the historical, social and cultural conditions implicated with each work; comprehension of concerns and values contained in them, such as justice, and how these are mirrored in modern literature and drama.

Computer Science

COMP 125 Visual Information Processing: Mobile Apps for Google Android
In this section of COMP 125, we will experiment using Google's new technology, App Inventor, to develop thinking and analysis skills by creating small mobile phone applications that run on Android operating system. App Inventor is intended to make the art of programming accessible to everyone--even those without the experience or strong interest in programming.  Android phones are not required; apps run on Emulator. App Inventor allows you to use visual tools and intuitive graphic methods to create your own apps without needed a programming language.

COMP 150  Introduction to Computing
The world overflows with electronic data.  This course introduces programming in a simple, powerful language like Python, with selection, repetition, functions, graphical effects, and dynamic interaction with the Internet, plus connections to lower level computer organization and computer implications in the wider world. At the end of the course, students will be empowered to manage and transform masses of data; understanding of technical, societal, and ethical issues involved. For additional course information, please visit: http://anh.cs.luc.edu/150/summerintro.html .

COMP 170 Introduction to Object-oriented Programming
This course is an introduction to the computer science major, covering basic concepts using the C# (C-Sharp) object-oriented (OO) programming language. The course will address the following questions: What is an algorithm? How does one write, debug, run (execute), and test an effective computer program? How does one convert an algorithm into a computer program? How does one judge a program? What does "object-oriented" mean? Topics include: variable, data types, input/output, loops and repetition, choice, arrays, subprograms, classes/objects, OO principles, and recursion.  This course is programming intensive and lab sessions will be held during online class periods.

COMP 312/412 Open Source Computing
This course will cover the fundamentals of Free and Open Source software development. Topics to be addressed include licensing, Linux, typical software development tools (e.g. compilers, scripting languages, build tools, and version control software), applications, and techniques for managing remote servers. Students will work on a significant development project involving free and open-source software and learn how to participate in open-source projects effectively.

COMP 317/417 Social, Legal, and Ethical Issues in Computing
This course covers social, legal, and ethical issues commonly arising in key areas related to computing technologies. Students will be able to understand the laws and issues in areas such as privacy, encryption, freedom of speech, copyrights and patents, computer crime, and computer/software reliability and safety; understanding of philosophical perspectives such as utilitarianism versus deontological ethics and basics of the U.S. legal system.

COMP 349/449 Wireless Networking and Security
Prerequisite: COMP 271
In a mobile world, the ability to gain network access in a convenient manner, but yet securely,  is becoming more and more of a requirement.  This course will explore the wireless standards, authentication issues, common configuration models for commercial versus institution installs and analyze the security concerns associated with ad-hoc and standards-based methods of networking.

COMP 351/451 Network Management
Networks today are high-speed, heterogeneous, large-scale and delivers different media including data, audio and video. How do you effectively manage today’s complex computer networks? This class provides complete yet accessible answers to network managers and researchers in this field. The course covers the basics of network management, alternative architectures, evaluation techniques, network management system components, SNMP and CMIP management protocols and the ISO network management applications: fault management, performance management, configuration management, security management, and accounting management. The course emphasizes the practical experience of developing network and distributed systems management tools using the SNMP++ and AdventNet wrappers. This course also highlights the latest advances in networks and distributed management area and shows case studies of academic and industrial systems such as HiFi, SMARRT, OpenView, NetView and Tivoli.

Criminal Justice

CJC 323 Criminal Procedures
This course provides an in-depth, sophisticated coverage of criminal procedures surrounding investigations, stops, searches and seizure, arrests, interrogations, and procedural remedies. Students will be able to identify and articulate the origin, interpretation and application of legal procedures as they relate to matters involving the police, and how these relate to the overall operation and effectiveness of the criminal justice system.

CJC 373 Intimate Partner Violence
This course will address the nature and scope of intimate partner violence, the factors that contribute to it, as well as the theories that have been developed to explain it. Attention will be paid to society’s responses to intimate partner violence. Students will be able to describe the theory, extent, nature, and impact of intimate partner violence, and how the community and criminal justice system respond to this problem.

CJC 390 Capstone Field Experience -- Garry Bombard

The purpose of this course is to enhance the student's development and learning through observational and participatory experience in criminal justice agencies. Students will be able to contribute in a meaningful way to the operation of a specific criminal justice agency and be able to identify and describe the link between their field experience and prior courses.

CJC 390 Capstone Field Experience --Jona Goldschmidt
This junior or senior-level (CJC 390), or graduate-level (CJC 502), course provides students with a real-world experience working as an intern in a criminal justice agency or office.  Department permission required. The objective of this course is to enhance the student's development and education through engaged learning in the form of observational and participatory experience in criminal justice agencies. At the end of this course, students will have had the opportunity for engaged learning by way of contributing in a meaningful way to the operation of a specific criminal justice agency.  This experience will enable students to identify and describe the linkage between their field experience and prior coursework at Loyola University Chicago.  (Additional outcomes are specific below).  Students will also be able to decide whether the particular field in which they worked is the one best suited for them in the future.

English

UCLR 100 Interpreting Literature: Haunted Literature (LSC)

Ghosts are remarkably dynamic figures in literature: they both comment upon the past and alter the present; they dredge up memories and offer paths to redemption; they reveal past transgressions and punish living transgressors. Accordingly, hauntings, as metaphors for lost love, mental instability, addiction, trauma, and more, are fixtures of both American and world literature. In this course, you will explore several ways of thinking about the haunted and the haunting -- both literally and figuratively speaking -- in poetry, drama, and prose spanning hundreds of years and several cultures. As you explore this theme, you will develop a literary and analytical vocabulary for discussing literature that will lead to a greater appreciation of literature outside of this course. Demonstrated application of terminology will be emphasized over rote memorization of definitions.  This course places a heavy emphasis on class discussion and individual participation in class and small group discussion. Aside from participation, assignment will likely include individual and/or group presentations, response papers, close readings, several unannounced reading quizzes, a final paper, and 3 tests. Major works (subject to change) will include Samuel Taylor Coleridge’s The Rime of the Ancient Mariner; Noel Coward’s Blithe Spirit; Juan Rulfo’s Pedro Paramo, and Stephen King’s The Shining, as well as shorter works and poems by Edith Wharton, Joe Hill, Robert Frost, Billy Collins, William Shakespeare, Christina Rossetti, and Virginia Woolf.

UCLR 100 Interpreting Literature (Cuneo Mansion & Gardens)
What connects cultures separated by centuries and continents? What values, dilemmas, and questions continually resurface in different forms? What differences make individuals and cultures unique? This foundational literature course will develop your ability to read closely and analyze carefully. We will explore a variety of prose, poetry, drama, and film from around the world and across history, with a focus on 20th- and 21st-century world literature. We will master key literary and critical terms and employ a variety of critical approaches to analyzing and interpreting literature. “Interpreting Literature” is about what texts say but also about how we use them (or don’t), so we will also ask questions like what is literature? How do we decide what counts and what’s good? Why do all cultures create it? Why do we read it? Why require it in college? This course will enhance your understanding of literature, its role in the world, and how the skills we use to study it can be of benefit in other areas of your life.

ENGL 210 Advanced Writing: Business Writing
(Writing Intensive)
Business Writing is a seminar designed to build and improve effective communication practices for use in the business community. The ideas of “personal professionalism” and “priority of purposes” guide an exploration of business writing genres ranging from correspondence to memos, and from employment documents to executive summaries. Collaboration, peer interaction, and individual
economy direct the creation of a series of writing projects that use revision and research as a necessary step in the writing process.

ENGL 271 Exploring Poetry
Requirement: UCLR 100 for students admitted to Loyola University for Fall 2012 or later. No requirement for students admitted to Loyola prior to Fall 2012 or those with a declared major or minor in the Department of English, Department of Classical Studies, or Department of Modern Languages and Literatures.

In this introductory course, we will read and discuss a widely varied selection of poetry extending from the Elizabethans to the English Romantics and Victorians to more contemporary voices.  Our readings will include the works of primarily English and American poets, with additional selections from other European writers, as well.

 

 

ENGL 272 Exploring Drama
Requirement: UCLR 100 for students admitted to Loyola University for Fall 2012 or later. No requirement for students admitted to Loyola prior to Fall 2012 or those with a declared major or minor in the
Department of English, Department of Classical Studies, or Department of Modern Languages and Literatures.

This course is an introduction to classical and modern theatre. In this course we will endeavor analyze the structure and philosophical preoccupation of the authors. We will compare and contrast the classical format with the radically different modern approach. A selection of works, from different genres, will provide the basis of our investigation. We will analyze and discuss the style, structure, and theme in each of these works, focusing on the technical language and critical analysis of drama criticism.

 

ENGL 273 Exploring Fiction
Requirement: UCLR 100 for students admitted to Loyola University for Fall 2012 or later. No requirement for
students admitted to Loyola prior to Fall 2012 or those with a declared major or minor in the Department of English, Department of Classical Studies, or Department of Modern Languages and Literatures.

This course will explore nineteenth-century American Gothic fiction, covering tales of mystery and terror by writers like Washington Irving, Edgar Allen Poe, Nathaniel Hawthorne, and others.  We will study elements of fiction like structure, character, symbolism, and point-of-view and will specifically discuss the motivations and strategies underlying authors’ use of the Gothic mode. In addition, we will focus on how fiction is interpreted, asking what kinds of meanings are lurking beneath the surface of some of the nineteenth century’s best-known fiction. This is a writing intensive course, so 3-4 formal writing assignments of varying lengths will be assigned. In addition, requirements include reading all assigned texts, participating in class and group discussions, writing informal response papers, and taking daily quizzes and a final exam.

 

ENGL 273 Exploring Fiction
Requirement: UCLR 100 for students admitted to Loyola University for Fall 2012 or later. No requirement for
students admitted to Loyola prior to Fall 2012 or those with a declared major or minor in the Department of English, Department of Classical Studies, or Department of Modern Languages and Literatures.

This course focuses on the understanding, appreciation, and criticism of prose fiction. Students will be able to demonstrate understanding of fiction as a means of exploring human experience and understanding the creative process, and be able to use the technical vocabulary necessary for understanding fiction. This section focuses on fiction from the Victorian period (roughly 1837-1901). We'll find that the Victorians used fiction to grapple with many problems that we still face: consumerism, inequality, a desire for life to have meaning and beauty, rapidly changing technologies that offer both benefits and threats, and the search for a conceptual framework with which to make sense of the world.

ENGL 283 Women in Literature (Online)

This course will be taught exclusively online, which means that there will be no “face-to-face” meetings on campus. Part of the instruction, discussion, and guidance about assignments will take place via postings in Sakai and Adobe Connect, which students can access at their own pace and time. The remainder of the instruction and discussion will take place in bi-weekly synchronous online sessions, which will meet on Mondays and Wednesdays from 5:00 p.m.-6:00 p.m. CST.

Please note that the pre-requisite for this course is UCLR 100 for students admitted to Loyola University for Fall 2012 or later.  There is no requirement for students admitted to Loyola prior to Fall 2012 or those with a declared major or minor in the Department of English, Department of Classical Studies, or Department of Modern Languages and Literatures.  Further, this course satisfies 3 credits of the Core Curriculum requirements in Literary Knowledge and Experience and 3 credits of the Writing Intensive requirement. In addition, the course counts as a 200-level elective for both the English major and minor and meets the 3-credit multicultural requirement of the English major.

Cross-listed with WOST 283, this course will examine the ways in which non-western women writers have portrayed gender issues and their historical and social causes and manifestations.  Drawing upon selected West Indian, African, American, and South Asian fiction, we will analyze how the authors re-present traditional and patriarchal values and ideals and create women's culture.  And we will consider whether women's experiences and concerns are universal, or whether they are culture-specific and based upon issues of nationality, religion, race, ethnicity, and class/caste. In addition, we will examine the role of contributing literary techniques, including setting, structure, language, narrative voice, and characterization, to arrive at comparative assessments of the diverse voices of contemporary women writers.

ENGL 284 Introduction to Film History         
According to author Stephen King, “the best horror films, like the best fairy tales, manage to be reactionary, anarchistic, and revolutionary all at the same time.” This course explores the history of film through the genre of horror, focusing on what makes these films reactionary and revolutionary, both in terms of formal conventions and in relation to the cultural moments that produced them. Students will learn the vocabulary of film studies, and demonstrate a competency of that vocabulary in class discussions and in formal assignments, with an emphasis on how these films generate effects of horror. Assignments will include required reading and viewing, worksheets, quizzes, participation, a final paper, and a short presentation. Films discussed may include: Des Cabinet des Dr. Caligari (1920), Vampyr (1932), Cat People (1942), Invasion of the Body Snatchers (1956), Psycho (1960), Night of the Living Dead (1968), Suspiria (1977), Alien (1979), Poltergeist (1982), Ringu (1998), El Orfanato (2007) and [REC] (2008). Although most films will be screened in class, some outside viewing will be necessary. 

ENGL 290 Human Values in Literature (Online)

This course will be taught exclusively online, which means that there will be no “face-to-face” meetings on campus. Part of the instruction, discussion, and guidance about assignments will take place via postings in Sakai and Adobe Connect, which students can access at their own pace and time. The remainder of the instruction and discussion will take place in bi-weekly synchronous online sessions, which will meet on Tuesdays and Thursdays from 5:00 p.m.-6:00 p.m. CST.

Please note that the pre-requisite for this course is UCLR 100 for students admitted to Loyola University for Fall 2012 or later.  There is no requirement for students admitted to Loyola prior to Fall 2012 or those with a declared major or minor in the Department of English, Department of Classical Studies, or Department of Modern Languages and Literatures.  Further, this course satisfies 3 credits of the Core Curriculum requirements in Literary Knowledge and in Promoting Justice Values and 3 credits of the Writing Intensive requirement. In addition, the course counts as a 200-level elective for both the English major and minor and meets the 3-credit multicultural requirement of the English major.

Adopting an international and cross-disciplinary perspective, this section of English 290 will examine the portrayal of human values in modern and contemporary works by selected non-western writers from Africa, the West Indies, South Asia, and USA. Our main aim will be to examine the extent to which the societies under study (and the individuals who constitute them) share universal values and the extent to which these societies and their values are predicated upon culture specific norms and expectations. To this end, we will consider the role of nationalism, tradition, religion, race, ethnicity, gender, and class/caste in the conception and practice of such values. In addition, we will analyze the cultural bases of contributing literary techniques, including structure, language, narrative focus, and characterization among others, to arrive at comparative assessments of the portrayal of human values in modern world literature.

ENGL 317 The Writing of Poetry
This course approaches the writing of poetry as both a study and a craft that requires reading, exploration, practice, and sharing. We will read a wide range of poetry in order to discuss its roots as a cultural form of expression, and its contemporary manifestation as an art form as a basis for our own work. Readings include traditional and experimental verse, prose poetry, hybrid writing, and poetics. The workshop element of the course will include prompts for writing and the presentation of student poetry to the group with the expectation of respectful and productive responses that will encourage writers to build upon their ideas for subject, form, and style.

ENGL 318 The Writing of Fiction
Students will learn the art and craft of writing fiction in a supportive, workshop environment through a. Reading and discussing of master writers; b. Writing three original stories; and c. Having these stories discussed and critiqued by the instructor and by fellow writers. Class participation is emphasized. This course is writing intensive.

ENGL 326 Plays of Shakespeare
In this course, students will study plays in various genres—comedy, history, tragedy, and romance—and from various stages of Shakespeare’s career, reading them closely and considering them in relation to the intellectual, political, and social contexts in which they were produced, the theatrical practices and conventions of the age, and Shakespeare’s own development as a playwright.  We will also explore the implications of various methods of interpreting and performing the plays.  Requirements will include two or three quizzes and two papers.

ENGL 351 Contemporary Literature
This course focuses on texts written from the end of World War II to the present. Students will be able to demonstrate understanding of recent major literary trends with special attention to the intersection of culture and technology with literary experimentation of genre and form.

ENGL 394 Internship/English
English 394 provides practical, on-the-job experience for English majors in adapting their writing and analytical skills to the needs of such fields as publishing, editing, and public relations.  Students must have completed six courses in English and
must have a GPA of 3.0 or higher before applying for an internship. Qualified second semester juniors and seniors may apply to the program.  Interested students must arrange to meet with the Internship Director during the pre-registration period and must bring with them a copy of their Loyola transcripts, a detailed resume (which includes the names and phone numbers of at least two references), and at least three writing samples.  Students may be required to conduct part of their job search on-line and to go out on job interviews before the semester begins.  Course requirements include: completion of a minimum of 120 hours of work; periodic meetings with the Internship Director; a written evaluation of job performance by the site supervisor; a term paper, including samples of writing produced on the job.

ENGL 399 Special Studies in Literature
Students arrange for this course on an individual basis by consulting a faculty member who agrees to supervise the independent study. When the student and the faculty member have agreed on the work to be done, the student submits the plan to the director of undergraduate programs for approval and registration. Usually students will work independently and produce a research paper, under the direction of the faculty member.

Fine Arts

Dance

DANC 121 Modern Dance I
Modern Dance I is designed to increase student’s body awareness, strength, flexibility and musicality. Students will study the technique and theory of Fall and Recovery developed by Doris Humphrey. Students will develop a basic dance technique, be able to describe and demonstrate the differences between modern dance and ballet, and will understand the history of the development of modern dance as a uniquely American art form.

DANC 394 Dance Internship
Department consent required.
Dance students complete a semester long internship providing an opportunity to use their
technical, research or organizations skills in a professional setting. Students gain professional
experience working at a dance organization while reflecting on their work experience and
applying theories and techniques acquired from their first dance courses. Students must complete and reflect upon 50 hours of internship experience per credit hour that is pre-approved by the
Department of Fine and Performing Arts.

 DANC 395 Independent Study
Prerequisite: Written permission of chairperson
Independent study projects may be of various kinds and in any recognized area of the dance. Such projects should be done under the close supervision of a dance faculty member.

DANC 397Fieldwork in Chicago: Dance
Coming soon!

Fine Arts

FNAR 114 Painting  I
An introduction to the basic elements of painting including: the application of drawing, design, and color principles.  A variety of materials will be explored with an emphasis on oil painting. Observational problems will be introduced to build technical, perceptual, and personal expressive interpretation of form through the painting idiom.  Students will be able to demonstrate an understanding of basic painting principles and vocabulary, through practice and articulation of both formal and artistic ideas.

FNAR 115 Photography I
An introduction to the basic equipment, materials, processes, and philosophy of black and white photography. Students learn control of the camera and printing processes as well as the verbal skills necessary to understand and appreciate the nature of the medium and its function as a means of communication and fine art. An adjustable 35mm camera is required.

FNAR 202 - Modern Art
A survey of major art movements in Europe and America from Impressionism through the twentieth century, this course examines evolving ideas about the forms, content, techniques, and functions of art in the modern era considered within its social, political, and historical context. At the end of the course, students will be able to demonstrate knowledge of the ideas, formal expressions, themes, techniques, and functions of art in relation to the social- historical context of the modern era. Students acquire the skills to critically analyze the relationships between art forms and their relation to modern culture.

FNAR 233 Digital Media I: Pixel
An exploration of image editing and image creation using Adobe Photoshop.  This industry standard software is introduced as a vehicle for basic design concepts and as a tool for creative expression. Students gain an understanding of software skills and design basics. They develop the ability and techniques to manipulate software in the production of artistic compositions effectively combining image and typography.

FNAR 234 Digital Media II: Vector
An exploration of vector illustration using Adobe Illustrator. This industry standard software is introduced as a vehicle for basic design concepts and as a tool for creative expression.  Students gain an understanding of software skills and design basics. They develop the ability and techniques to manipulate software in the production of artistic compositions effectively combining image and typography.

FNAR 368 Gallery Internship
Please contact the department for course details. 

FNAR 380 Internship I
Please contact the department for course details. 

FNAR 381 Internship II 
Please contact the department for course details.
   
FNAR 399 Independent Study
Please contact the department for course details.

Music

MUSC 101 Art of Listening
Focus is on the acquisition and enhancement of listening skills through direct experience of musical works along with an examination of cross-cultural similarities and differences among musical styles. Concert attendance is required.   Students will develop a cultivation of musical perception through a process of repeated and guided listenings; strengthening of listening skills while developing and expanding styles perspectives.

MUSC 102 Classical Piano I
For the student who has never had keyboard instruction and is interested in learning the art of performance on the piano. Fundamentals of music theory, note reading and personal enjoyment are emphasized. Strongly recommended for those preparing to teach music in elementary school. Students will learn a basic keyboard ability with an emphasis on reading music symbols accurately while also enjoying the making and doing of music.

MUSC 103 Classical Guitar I
For the student who has never had guitar instruction and is interested in learning the art of performance on the guitar.  Fundamentals of music theory, note reading and personal enjoyment are emphasized. Strongly recommended for those preparing to teach music in elementary school. Students will gain a basic guitar ability with an emphasis on reading music symbols accurately while also enjoying the making and doing of music.

MUSC 394 Internship in Music
Department consent required.
Music students complete a semester long internship providing an opportunity to use their
technical, research, or organizations skills in a professional setting. Students gain professional
experience working at a music organization while reflecting on their work experience and
applying theories and techniques acquired from their music courses. Students must complete and
reflect upon 50 hours of internship experience per credit hour. No more than six credit hours of Internship or Fieldwork can be applied to the major.

MUSC 397 Fieldwork in Chicago Music
Please department for details.

MUSC 399 Independent Study
Please department for details.

Theatre

THTR 100 Introduction to Theatre
This course is an introductory study of the theatrical art form and its contemporary production practice. Students will demonstrate the ability to identify the variety of collaborating arts and artists that combine to create of a work of theatre; to analyze a play script for live performance; to evaluate theatrical production; and to creatively apply knowledge of theatrical process through expressive and creative endeavors.

THTR 321 Theatre Practicum
This course is a practical application of the material studied in a variety of theatre classes, and provides hands-on experience in facets of theatrical production. Theatre Majors are required to take five credits of Theatre Practicum to complete the major. 

 

THTR 323 Rehearsal and Performance
Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor
This course allows students to receive credit for stage managing, acting in, or directing a campus production during the semester. Completion and submission of a journal or paper is required. Course may be repeated up to 12 times for a total of no more than 12 credit hours. Students may not receive THTR 321 and THTR 323 credit for the same production assignment. Students will gain performance experience, assess personal artistic growth, and reflect on application of performance theory and technique covered in coursework to production practice.

THTR 394 Internship in Theatre
Department consent required
Theatre students complete a semester long internship providing an opportunity to use their technical, research or organizations skills in a professional setting. Students gain professional experience working at a theatrical organization while reflecting on their work experience and applying theories and techniques acquired from their theatre courses. Students must complete and reflect upon 50 hours of internship experience per credit hour. No more than six credit hours of Internship or Fieldwork can be applied to the major.

THTR 397 Fieldwork in Chicago
Prerequisite: Written permission of chairperson
Variable credit (1-6 hours) given for projects undertaken in theatrical groups outside the university. Students keep a journal and write evaluative papers. Repeatable for credit.

History

HIST 102 Evolution of Western Ideas & Institutions since 1500
This course traces the development of western civilization and its global impact since the 17th century to the present. Students will gain an understanding of history as a discipline, developing critical thinking skills based on historical knowledge about key people, places and events that shaped the modern world.

HIST 203 American Pluralism (course is offered both in-person and online)
Requirement: HIST 101 or HIST 102 for students admitted to Loyola University for Fall 2012 or later. No
requirement for students admitted to Loyola prior to Fall 2012 or those with a
declared major or minor in History.

This course is an introduction to history as a discipline, and an analysis of the origins, development and structure of the United States as a pluralistic and multiracial society from 1609 to the present. Students will be able to demonstrate historical knowledge, draw links between the American experience and national identities, and to develop critical thinking and communication skills.

HIST 204 Global History Since 1500
Requirement: HIST 101 or HIST 102 for students admitted to Loyola University for Fall 2012 or later. No requirement for students admitted to Loyola prior to Fall 2012 or those with a declared major or minor in History.

This course deals with the emergence of the modern world, and can focus on such topics as the expansion and intensification of cross-cultural interaction (imperialism, colonialism, and nationalism); the spread of information (capitalism, industrialism, and popular sovereignty); race and ethnicity, gender, and socio-economic status. Students will be able to evaluate and explain the forces of historical continuity and change; demonstrate how the encounters/changes between and among societies produced the world we have today; analyze and discuss the significance of primary and secondary sources and how they relate to the history under discussion.

HIST 209 Survey of Islamic History
Requirement: HIST 101 or HIST 102 for students admitted to Loyola University for Fall 2012 or later. No requirement for students admitted to Loyola prior to Fall 2012 or those with a declared major or minor in History.

The course will introduce the historical development of Islamic civilization and the formation of Muslim social and political institutions from the 7th century to the present.  Students will be able to demonstrate knowledge of the historical development and diversity of Islamic beliefs, practices, and institutions in varied regional contexts and
historical periods.

HIST 111 The United States to 1865 
Requirement: HIST 101 or HIST 102 for students admitted to Loyola University for Fall 2012 or later.  No requirement for students admitted to Loyola prior to Fall 2012 or those with a declared major or minor in History.                                                         

This course is an introduction to the history of the United States from the colonial era through the Civil War. Topics under discussion include the growth and development of democratic government, the formation of a diverse society; the expansion of the national territory; and the crisis over slavery and secession. This course satisfies the historical knowledge area and develops critical thinking and communication skills.

HIST 212 U.S. History Since 1865
Requirement: HIST 101 or HIST 102 for students admitted to Loyola University for Fall 2012 or later. No requirement for students admitted to Loyola prior to Fall 2012 or those with a declared major or minor in History.

This course is an introduction to the history of the United States from the colonial era through the Civil War. Students will demonstrate an understanding of Native American societies, the impact of European colonization, the creation and evolution of democratic institutions in a multicultural society, the geographic expansion of the United States, and the impact of slavery.

HIST 299 Contemporary Global Issues in Historical Perspective (INTS 298)               
This course will introduce students to important contemporary issues such as globalization, resurgent ethnic and religious strife, racism, imperialism, and the crisis of the nation state, among others. Both thematic and chronological approaches will be employed in examining selected world regions.  Students will be able to demonstrate an understanding of the way history shapes pressing issues in the contemporary world, the way a historical approach helps make sense of these same issues, and the value of comparative study and analysis across time and place.

HIST 300C Eastern Europe
Special topics or new approaches of current interest to the instructor. This course may be used to fulfill the history major distribution requirement in 300-Level Post-1700 European History or may count as a 300-Level history elective. Students may repeat the course for credit when the topic changes.  Students will gain familiarity with the topic; the ability to make connections between secondary and primary sources; and the capacity to think critically about the ways that historians have approached major issues.

HIST 311 The Medieval World, 1100-1500
This course examines European society and culture in the later Middle Ages. Students will demonstrate understanding of new forms of schools and learning; the origins of national monarchies; the crusades; chivalry; courtly love and the role of women; the rise of towns; church and state relations; the Black Death and the Hundred Years War.

HIST 384 Irish Diaspora
This course examines the origins and diversity of Irish migration to the United States since the eighteenth century. Students will use historical knowledge to develop critical thinking and communications skills about the first large American ethnic minority and its impact on the history of the United States.

HIST 398        History Internship                                                                
(Students can find information about Internships through the Department of History: www.luc.edu/history.)Internships allow students to earn three course credits while gaining valuable professional experience in public and private institutions engaged in history-related projects.  Internship possibilities include historical associations and societies; oral history projects; museums and halls of fame; entrepreneurial history firms; genealogical services; preservation agencies; and archives and libraries.  Interns work for a minimum of five hours per week in an internship position jointly agreed upon by the student and the internship director.  Interns are also required to attend seminar meetings, keep a weekly journal, and write a paper related to the internship experience.    This course fulfills the Civic Engagement and Leadership Values requirement of the core curriculum.

HIST 399 Directed Study                                                                            
Prior Permission of Instructor required.  Please see department. 
This course provides students with the opportunity to work under the direction of a faculty member on a particular area of interest that is not part of the department’s usual curriculum.   Students will gain an understanding of a specific area of history through the close reading of selected texts and the preparation of a research paper.

International Studies

INTS 370 Internship in International Studies
Department consent required.
Students earn course credit while serving as an intern in government agencies, non-profit organizations, and businesses relevant to the field of international studies. Students will obtain in-depth knowledge and practical experience in a professional work setting relevant to the student’s future career path.

INTS 399 Directed Readings
Department consent required.
This course offers an independent program of research under the direction of a faculty sponsor leading to a major research paper. Students will hone research and writing skills in close collaboration with a faculty sponsor.

Mathematics and Statistics

MATH 117 College Algebra
Prerequisite: MATH 100 with a grade of "C" or better or Math Diagnostic Test. Students study Inverse functions, quadratic functions and complex numbers. Detailed study of polynomial functions including zeros, factor theorem and graphs. Rational functions, exponential and logarathmic functions and their applications. Systems of equations, inequalities, partial fractions, linear programming, sequences and series. Word problems are emphasized throughout the course.

MATH 118 Precalculus
Prerequisite: MATH 117 with a grade of "C" or better or Math Diagnostic Test. Functions and change with an emphasis on linear, quadratic, exponential, and logarithmic functions and their graphs. Specific geometric topics include concavity and how transformations affect graphs. Topics in trigonometry include radians, sinusoidal functions, identities, sum/difference formulas, double/half angle formulas and trigonometric equations. Other topics include polar coordinates.

MATH 131 Elements of Calculus I
Prerequisite: MATH 118 with a grade of "C" or better or appropriate score on the Math Diagnostic Test. An overview of calculus, taught at the intuitive level, intended primarily for students in the life and social sciences and in business. Topics include: limits, continuity, differentiation, exponential growth and decay, integration, area, the fundamental theorem of calculus, chain-rule, curve sketching including concavity and applied max/min problems.

MATH 132 Elements of Calculus II
Prerequisite: MATH 131 with a grade of "C" or better or Math Diagnostic Test. A continuation of Math 131. Topics include: properties of the integral, techniques of integration, numerical methods, improper integrals, applications to geometry, physics, economics and probability theory. This course also serves as an introduction to differential equations and mathematical modeling, systems of differential equations, power series, Taylor series and Taylor approximations.

MATH 161 Calculus I
Prerequisite: MATH 118 with a grade of "C" or better or Math Diagnostic Test. A traditional introduction to differential and integral calculus. Functions, limits, continuity, differentiation, intermediate and mean-value theorems, curve sketching, optimization problems, related rates, definite and indefinite integrals, fundamental theorem of calculus, logarithmic and exponential functions. Applications to physics and other disciplines.

MATH 162 Calculus II
Prerequisite: MATH 161 with a grade of "C-" or better or departmental permission. A continuation of Math 161. Calculus of logarithmic, exponential, inverse trigonometric and hyperbolic functions. Techniques of integration. Applications of integration to volume, surface area, arc length, center of mass and work. Numerical sequences and series. Study of power series and the theory of convergence. Study of Taylor's theorem with remainder.

Statistics

STAT 103 Fundamentals of Statistics
This course provides an introduction to statistical reasoning and techniques in descriptive and inferential statistics and their applications in economics, education, genetics, medicine, physics, political science, and psychology.
Students will obtain a background in the fundamentals of descriptive and inferential statistics along with an understanding of their uses and misuses.  This course satisfies the quantitative literacy requirement of the core curriculum. Not open to students who have completed ISOM 241.

STAT 335 Introduction to Biostatistics
Prerequisite:  BIOL 102; MATH 132 or 162
This course provides an introduction to the statistical methods used in designing biological experiments and in data analysis, including computer laboratory assignments with biological data.  Students interested in research in the life sciences will obtain a background in the appropriate use of statistical methods as an experimental tool.

Modern Languages

FREN 101 French I
This course is for students without previous study of the language. This introduction to the basic elements of French will enable students to develop communicative skills and a fundamental knowledge of French speaking peoples, their language and their culture. One additional hour per week in the language laboratory is required.

ITAL 101 Italian I
For students without previous study of the language. This introduction to the basic elements of Italian will enable students to develop communicative skills and a fundamental knowledge of the Italian people, their language and their culture. One additional hour per week in the language laboratory is required.

FREN 102 French II
Prerequisite: FREN 101 with a grade of "C" or better, or equivalent or one year of secondary school training. Further instruction in basic skills. One additional hour per week in the language laboratory is required.

FREN 369 Introduction to French Reading Knowledge
An introduction to French with an emphasis on reading expository prose and with the attention to grammar and vocabulary necessary to facilitate reading. Offered for graduate students preparing to satisfy foreign language reading requirements.

ITAL 102 Italian II
Prerequisite: ITAL 101 with a grade "C" or better or equivalent, or one year of secondary school training. Further instruction in basic skills. One additional hour per week in the language laboratory is required.

LITR 200 European Masterpieces
This course serves as a broad introduction to the field of European literature.  We will progress in a historical manner, beginning with the first picaresque novel, Lazarillo de Tormes, and ending with modern European fiction. The goal is to help students acquire a general understanding of major fictional works:  Attention is paid not only to the literary movements these works represent, but also to the subtle interplay of history, geography, language and cultural norms that gave rise to specific literary forms. While the reading load is quite heavy, the books are compelling and the themes broad. The selected texts will fulfill the Literary Knowledge and Experience, and the Communication Skills (written and oral) requirements.

LITR 200-01W  European Masterpieces--Italian Masterpieces  
This Writing Intensive course will examine some of the most representative works in the Italian literary and cultural tradition. We will begin with the Medieval world of Petrarch’s poetry and Boccaccio’s short stories. We will then study Machiavelli’s political theories, both through The Prince and The Mandragola, “the” comedy of the Renaissance. Some movies will accompany our readings.

LITR 202 European Novel
Requirement: UCLR 100 for students admitted to Loyola University for Fall 2012 or later. No requirement for students admitted to Loyola prior to Fall 2012 or those with a declared major or minor in the Department of English, Department of Classical Studies, or Department of Modern Languages and Literatures.

This course will focus on major European novels. Students will gain an overview of the literary production of representative European novelists studied in the historical and societal context.

LITR 211 Latina Authors
This course is a survey of the contributions that Latin American women have made (and continue to make) through literary, visual and performing arts.  Students will examine issues of gender, ethnic and cultural identity, feminism, and representation through various genres including cinema, fiction and non-fiction writing, electronic music and punk, photography, sculpture, painting and poetry. As students will become familiar with the artistic production of Latin American women from colonial times to the present, they will ascertain the specific conditions in Latin America with regards to gender, sex, sexuality, patriarchy and feminism through the artistic production of women in the continent. Students will also familiarize themselves with how Latin American women’s cultural productions have served as models for artistic development, empowerment, and leadership for marginalized groups.

LITR 283-01W   Dante
This Writing Intensive course will focus on Dante and the Medieval world. The Divine Comedy is the founding text of Italian literature and one of the most influential masterpieces in the Western tradition.  We will study the Vita Nuova/New Life as precursor of the Divine Comedy and then go on to read key cantos from the Inferno, the Purgatorio, and the Paradiso. The objective of this course is twofold: first, to help the students comprehend Dante’s poetic world in the context of Medieval culture and, second, to make them aware of the critical process itself.

POLS  102  Polish II
This course focuses on introducing the student to the basics of Polish, through conversation, pronunciation and grammar. Primary emphasis is on enabling the student to speak and understand basic Polish. Students will be able to use correctly and understand the basic grammatical forms of the verbs, nouns and adjectives of Polish as an inflected language. They will be appropriately prepared to complete the full view of Polish structures in Polish.

SPAN 101 Spanish I
For students without previous study of the language. This introduction to the basic elements will enable students to develop communicative skills and a fundamental knowledge of Spanish/Hispanic speaking peoples, their language and their culture. One additional hour per week in the language laboratory is required.

SPAN 102 Spanish II
Prerequisite: SPAN 101 with a grade of "C" or better or equivalent, or one year of secondary school training. Further instruction in basic skills. One additional hour per week in the language laboratory is required.

SPAN 366 Spanish Cinema
The development of film in Spain has followed a course parallel to American and other European cinemas, it has also maintained a style of its own that is closely tied to the culture, values, and unique conditions that distinguish Spain from other countries.  We will
trace the development of Spanish cinema from the 50’s to the end of the 20th century.  Although the course will follow a chronological order, other elements of analysis will be attended to, such as authorship, genre and style.  Our aim is to understand how Spanish film makers see and represent their society through the experience of individual characters in specific situations. The course aims to teach some basic concepts in film analysis.  Students will read sections from the textbook to learn film concepts and ideas and then apply them to the films assigned in class.  There is a strong cultural component with emphasis placed on special aspects of Spanish culture and on the way films frame those features through the camera eye.  Social and linguistic elements will be carefully explained to help students gain a better grasp of verbal expressiveness. The course aims to improve cultural awareness such as understanding of body language and its role in Spanish culture.  The writing component is designed to improve language skills.  At the end of the course, students would have gotten more practice in writing Spanish accurately and effectively.

PHILOSOPHY

PHIL 171 Philosophy of Religion
Copy to come.

PHIL 172 Metaphysics
Copy to come.

PHIL 177 Aesthetics
This course will explore one or more of the following philosophical questions in aesthetics: What is art? What is good art (art evaluation or critical theory)? What is beauty? What is it about human nature that allows us to experience beauty?

PHIL 130 Philosophy and Persons
The course examines the way philosophy looks for fundamental characteristics that identify life as a properly human life, asks about its ultimate meaning or purpose, and raises questions about what counts as a good life. Students will be able to demonstrate understanding of the various approaches of the philosophical question of what it means to be human.

PHIL 181 Ethics
This course examines ethical norms for conduct (e.g., theories of right and wrong action, of justice and of human rights) and ethical norms for judging the goodness or badness of persons and their lives. Special attention will be given to criteria for choosing between conflicting ethical theories, moral disagreement, the justification of moral judgments, and the application of ethical standards to practical decision-making and ethical questions that arise in everyday life. At the end of the course students are able to demonstrate understanding of criteria for choosing between conflicting ethical theories, moral disagreement, the justification of moral judgments, and the application of ethical standards to practical decision-making and ethical questions that arise in everyday life.

PHIL 182 Social and Political Philosophy
This course will investigate one of the central questions of philosophy and social theory: How we, as human beings, should live together. Students will be able to demonstrate understanding of the major philosophical questions in the area of social philosophy, with attention to the historical and conceptual development of these questions, and be able to articulate some of the major problems and responses central to this area of philosophy.

PHIL 274 Logic

Requirement: PHIL 130 for students admitted to Loyola University for Fall 2012 or later.  No requirement for students admitted to Loyola prior to Fall 2012 or those with a declared major or minor in the Department of  Philosophy or Department of Political Science. This course is a detailed study of the deductive methods and principles of correct reasoning, from both the traditional and modern point of view. Students will be able to formally analyze, evaluate, and demonstrate the various aspects of argumentation.

PHIL 287 Environmental Ethics
Requirement: PHIL 130 for students admitted to Loyola University for Fall 2012 or later.  No requirement for students admitted to Loyola prior to Fall 2012 or those with a declared major or minor in the Department of 
Philosophy or Department of Political Science.

This course introduces students to ethical reasoning and to various topics in environmental ethics. Topics may include: pollution, animal rights, and natural resources. Students will demonstrate an understanding of diverse
ethical theories and an ability to use philosophical reasoning to defend positions in topics covered.

PHIL 350 Directed Reading
Prerequisite: Students must have taken at least two philosophy courses and must have department consent. Independent research according to program developed jointly by the student and a faculty director. Open to majors and to non-majors with the permission of the chairperson.

Physics

PHYS 111 L College Physics Laboratory I
Pre- or Co-requisite: PHYS 111. One two-hour laboratory period per week, to complement Physics 111.


Prerequisites: College algebra or equivalent, trigonometry and geometry. This lecture and discussion course, together with College Physics II, will provide a comprehensive, non-calculus introduction to physics. Vectors, forces, Newtonian mechanics of translational, rotational and oscillary motion.

PHYS 112 College Physics II
Prerequisite: PHYS 111. This course is a continuation of Physics 111. Lecture and discussion of electricity and magnetism, sound, optics and selected topics from modern physics.

PHYS 112L College Physics Laboratory II
Pre- or Co-requisite: PHYS 112. One two-hour laboratory period per week, to complement Physics 112.

Political Science

PLSC 100 Political Theory (Online)
Requirement: PHIL 130 for students admitted to Loyola University for Fall 2012 or later.  No requirement for students admitted to Loyola prior to Fall 2012 or those with a declared major or minor in the Department of Philosophy or Department or Political Science. No requirements for visiting students.

An introduction to political theory, covering the principal ideas, controversies and institutions of political society. Students will be able to demonstrate an understanding of major approaches to the normative study of politics; to identify the assumptions underlying philosophical arguments; and to critically assess different theories of political justice.

PLSC 101 American Politics
Students will discuss and learn about American national government and politics, including institutions, group and electoral processes, and public policy. Students will be able to demonstrate an understanding of the American political system, the patterns of political participation and behavior of diverse individuals and groups in American society, and evaluate the roles and processes of U.S. political institutions.

PLSC 102 International Relations in an Age of Globalization
Competing perspectives on international and global issues such as North-South relations, human rights, war and peace, population growth, end environmentalism.  Students will be able to demonstrate an understand of the main approaches to the study of international politics and to analyze and asses such major substantive issues as interstate war, terrorism, arms control, international political economy, and sustainable development. Cross-listed with International Studies. Cross-listed with International Studies.

PLSC  337  Terrorism

An analysis of different types of terrorist insurgencies across the globe and of the efforts by governments to combat terrorism. Students will be able to explain what motives the turn to terror as a method of struggle and to assess the morality and effectiveness of the counterterrorism tactics adopted by various governments.

PLSC 370 - Fieldwork in Political Science-Internship
This course requires prior permission. Practical experience in political and governmental agencies and organizations in Chicago and Washington, D.C. Students learn about different forms of public service and the ethical responsibilities of civic engagement. Working in a professional office for fifteen weeks allows students to experience the world of public service first-hand. Students will be able to demonstrate an understanding of models of leadership and public service by working with supervisors who are typically leaders in their fields.

PLSC 390 Urban Politics
This course examines the political processes in cities and other local governments, examination of mayors, city councils, bureaucrats, and their interaction with local citizens and interest groups. Students will be able to demonstrate an understanding of urban governments, the patterns of political participation and behavior of diverse individuals and groups in urban politics, and evaluate the roles and processes of urban political institutions.

PLSC 396 Directed Readings in Political Science
Please see the department for details.

Psychology

PSYC 101 General Psychology
Basic concepts and methods of psychology. Primary emphasis on the scientific study of consciousness and human behavior. Topics include: human development, personality, learning, thinking, perception, testing, mental illness and mental health, and biological and social aspects of behavior.

PSYC 250 Cognitive Psychology
Prerequisite: PSYC 101. Overview of cognitive psychology. Topics include: human information processing, object recognition, memory, attention, language production and comprehension, reasoning, and problem solving. Students will understand, and be able to explain, how knowledge about mental events is obtained using a variety of experimental methods, discuss current empirical research and theories of cognition. Students will also understand well established cognitive theories about attention, memory, language processing, reasoning, and decision-making.

PSYC 273 Developmental Psychology
Prerequisite: PSYC 101. Survey of theory and research relevant to human growth and development with emphasis on physical, cognitive and social development from infancy through adolescence. Students will able to demonstrate understanding of basic theory and research in human development, and will develop skills in critical examination of psychological research as applied to current issues in human development.

PSYC 275 Social Psychology
Analysis of human thoughts, feelings and actions as influenced by other people. Topics include socialization, perception of self and others, prosocial and antisocial behavior, attitudes, interpersonal attraction, social influence and group behavior. Group B.

PSYC 304 Statistics
Prerequisite: PSYC 101 and previous math courses recommended. Fundamentals of statistical analysis in psychology and related fields. Topics include frequency distributions, central tendency, variability, graphical presentation, normal distribution correlation, sampling distributions and tests of statistical significance including analysis of variance.

PSYC 306 Research Methods
Prerequisite: PSYC 304. Logic and theory of the scientific method. Basic statistics and principles of research methodologies employed in approaching major problem areas in psychology. Written descriptions of research findings. This is a writing intensive course.

PSYC 314 Lab in Experimental Psychology: Cognition
Prerequisites: PSYC 250 and 306.
Laboratory demonstrations, experiments, and microcomputer applications in the area of human cognition. Topics vary, but include learning, memory, thinking and language processing.  Students gain skills and experience in experimental design, measurement, statistical analyses, and report writing as they relate to research on human cognition.

PSYC 318 Lab in Developmental Psychology
Prerequisites: PSYC 273 and 306. Lecture and laboratory on empirical studies of developmental processes in humans. Students focus on research in particular content areas within developmental stages (e.g., infancy, childhood, adolescence, adulthood) and research on changes in behavior across time. Students will demonstrate skills and knowledge of developmental methodology, designing, conducting, analyzing and interpreting the results of a research project, and writing a research paper in APA format.

PSYC 321 Laboratory-Social Psychology
Prerequisites: PSYC 273 and 306. Lectures, demonstrations, readings, and individual or group research projects illustrating various methods, such as observation, interviewing, archives, standardized tests, and experimentation, are used to learn about topics such as group influences on the individual, attitudes, prosocial and antisocial behavior, and perception of self and others. Students will demonstrate skills and knowledge of methodology in social psychological research; designing, conducting, analyzing and interpreting the results of a research project, and writing a research paper in APA format.

PSYC 331 Abnormal Psychology
This course focuses on the nature and causes of maladjustment and mental disorders. History of mental illness, diagnosis, research, and treatment of mental disorders. Students will demonstrate understanding of current approaches to researching maladaptive behavior, current views of maladaptive behavior, major categories of mental disorders, factors contributing to development of problems, different types of intervention strategies, and appreciation of social, ethical, and legal issues.

PSYC 338 Psychology of Personality
Prerequisite: PSYC 101
Facts and principles of personality study. Nature of personality, its structure, development, expression, and measurement. Exposition and evaluation of personality study methods with critical review of traditional and modern theories of personality. Students will acquire an understanding of different personality theories, critically evaluate these theories, and apply what they have learned.

PSYC 349 Maturity and Aging
Prerequisite: PSYC 273.
Overview of theory and research relevant to middle age and aging. Topics include personality, cognitive and social functioning as well as biological functioning. Applications to life situations, such as living arrangements, provision of health services, and retirement, are discussed. Students will demonstrate understanding of major theories, research methodologies, and empirical knowledge in the study of maturity and aging, and learn to recognize and reject myths and stereotypes associated with adult development and aging.

PSYC 397 Independent Research
Prerequisite: PSYC 306, senior psychology major standing and permission of the instructor and the department See department for details.

PSYC 399 Special Studies in Psychology
Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor and the department. See department for details.

Sociology

SOCL 101 Society in a Global Age
This is a foundational course in the social sciences which explores the effect of globalization on everyday life in the United States and elsewhere, using the basic perspectives and methodologies of sociology.

SOCL 121 Social Problems
This course is an opportunity to examine major issues facing society. In addition to analyzing the roots of social problems, the course addresses social policy concerns and explores solutions. Students will learn to critically examine the impact of a social problem and its possible solutions, to integrate knowledge gleaned from a variety of disciplines, to find and utilize relevant data and research in defining issues and solutions, and to view social problems from macro and micro perspectives as a means of applying workable solutions for the issues facing society.

SOCL 122 Race and Ethnic Relations
Requirement: ANTH 100, PLSC 102, PSYC 100 or SOCL 101 for students admitted to Loyola University for Fall 2012 or later.  No requirement for students admitted to Loyola prior to Fall 2012 or those with a declared major or minor in the Departments of Anthropology, Criminal Justice, Economics, Psychology, Political Science, Sociology, Human Services, or the School of Nursing.

This course examines the development of cultural, society, and self-understanding by exploring the social construction of race in the United States. The course explores how social constructions of race affect interpersonal relations, laws, policies, and practices in various racial and ethnic communities. Students will be able to demonstrate understanding of the conditions which have worsened racial tensions as well as how social movements have been successful at eradicating racially oppressive laws and working towards a just society.

SOCL 123 Mass Media and Popular Culture
This course examines the social organization and function of mass communication (TV, radio, movies, newspapers and magazines) in contemporary society and its impact on values, expectations and life styles of audiences; the relation of mass media to specialized interest groups in society; and the role of mass communications as reflector and determinant of popular culture.

SOCL 230 - Self & Society
This course examines the relationships between the self as a social product and the larger society in which that self is socialized, develops and expresses itself. Various theories of selfhood are explored. Students will come to appreciate how selfhood, their own and others, is a product of historical factors as well as social contexts such as class, gender, race, and ethnicity.

SOCL 380 Internship
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor or chair. Supervised field experience for students working in a selected community organization, government agency, social agency, or business.

 

SOCL 398 Independent Study
Independent research done in collaboration with a faculty member on a sociological topic defined by the student in consultation with a faculty member. Student gains experience and expertise conducting independent research.

Theatre (Please see Fine and Performing Arts)

Theology

THEO 100 Introduction to Christian Theology (Online and in-person sections)
This course is an introduction to reflection on and analysis of the Christian theological tradition. Students will be able to demonstrate understanding of the tasks of Christian theology in its efforts to understand the human situation from the perspective of faith, various challenges to theology in the contemporary world, and will focus on one or more current theological issues.

THEO 107 Introduction to Religious Studies (LSC and Cuneo Mansion locations)
This course is an introduction to the contemporary field of religious studies, focusing on both the theoretical
investigations of religious traditions, as well as on the study of selected religious texts and practices (such as creation stories, sacred biographies, sacred scriptures of a religious tradition(s) rituals, ritual taboos, religiously motivated behaviors. Students will be able to analyze and interpret various ways in which religious traditions intersect with contemporary issues.

THEO 185  Introduction to Christian Ethics: Environmental Issues
This core course introduces students to the major sources, methods, and insights of Christian ethics through the contemporary international challenges of environmental sustainability. These challenges include water availability and use, the food system, clean energy, global climate change, and declining biodiversity. Students will approach these issues through the framework of Christian ethics by doing background readings, drawing framing insights from instructor lectures, engaging in classroom discussion, and participating in five formal team debates. This is also a writing intensive course. This component of the course will engage students in both writing and editing for an international Jesuit project that is constructing a global online textbook in environmental science, spirituality, and ethics.

THEO 267 Jesus Christ
Requirement: THEO 100 or THEO 107 for students admitted to Loyola University for Fall 2012 or later. No requirement for students admitted to Loyola prior to Fall 2012.

This course examines the life of Jesus Christ, utilizing the Gospels, the writings of Paul and other biblical authors, the early ecumenical councils, and the history of church doctrine, including contemporary scholarship.

THEO 293 Christian Marriage
Requirement: THEO 100 or THEO 107 for students admitted to Loyola University for Fall 2012 or later.  No requirement for students admitted to Loyola prior to Fall 2012. No requirement for visiting students.

This course examines the Christian understanding of marriage. Students will be able to demonstrate understanding of historical & ethical principles used to evaluate particular issues relevant to the understanding of the Christian tradition of marriage.

THEO 295 Introduction to Islam
Requirement: THEO 100 or THEO 107 for students admitted to Loyola University for Fall 2012 or later. No requirement for students admitted to Loyola prior to Fall 2012.

This course will provide an introduction to Islam. Students will be able to demonstrate understanding of the most important Muslim scriptures, the general outline of the historical evolution of Islam, the key Islamic concepts, terms, values, and religious practices, and the diversity within Islam.

THEO 297  Introduction to Buddhism
Requirement: THEO 100 or THEO 107 for students admitted to Loyola University for Fall 2012 or later.  No requirement for students admitted to Loyola prior to Fall 2012. No requirement for visiting
students.

This course provides an introduction to Buddhism. Students will be able to demonstrate understanding of the most important Buddhist scriptures, the general outline of the historical evolution of Buddhism, including its different major branches, and the key Buddhist concepts, terms, values, and religious practices.

Loyola

Summer Sessions · College of Arts and Sciences • Lake Shore Campus • 1032 W. Sheridan Rd., Sullivan Center 235, Chicago, IL 60660
Phone: 773.508.3500 or 800.262.2373 · summer-sessions@luc.edu

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