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Loyola University Chicago

Women's Studies and Gender Studies

Course Descriptions

Undergraduate Courses

Domestic Violence; CRMJ 373/WSGS 392
In this class, you will be acquainted with two major perspectives on domestic violence: family violence and feminist theory. These perspectives are used to discuss the prevalence of domestic violence against men and women as well as the origins of domestic violence. The course focuses primarily on responses to intimate violence between couples with an emphasis on men's violence toward women, though lesbian and gay violence as well as the effects on children will be covered. This course examines how victims, criminal justice professionals, health professionals, and legislators make decisions about how to handle the violence. The lectures, discussions, and readings are intended to provide a critical analysis of responses to domestic violence by health providers, the public, criminal justice professionals and legislators. Students will be acquainted with the complex situational and personal considerations surrounding battered women's decisions to leave or stay with an abusive partner. The class also examines ethnic and cultural variation in the responses to and definitions of domestic violence across the world.

Families, SOCL 240/WSGS 242
The purpose of this class is to develop critical tools to examine the definition of family, understand how family has changed and the explore diversity within this institution. Over the course of this class, we will learn to sociologically examine both the ideology of family life and the diversity of lived experiences within family life. Towards this end, we will study the impact of structural forces and social change on family life; learn about how family life is shaped by other important social categories such as race, class and gender; and finally, examine the hopes and pressures facing the next generation as they begin to build their own families.

Feminist Methodologies, WSGS 399
This is a project-oriented course that represents the culmination of the WSGS major. Students will be exposed to feminist theory and method and complete and execute a project proposal. The theme for the course is sexual violence, broadly defined. The course is partially team-taught, with a few visiting faculty and campus/community-based advocates as guest lecturers who will inform the student’s knowledge about sexual awareness across disciplines, the campus, and the community. The goal is to initiate students into feminist research through a focus on sexual violence as practiced in the field and for the students to ultimately conduct research of their own. For the fall 2011 semester, the projects will be centered at the Wellness Center at Loyola University Chicago which received a CCRT Grant. Ultimately, working in groups, students will create a project proposal to be defined in greater detail during the class through student-staff-faculty collaboration. The project must (1) demonstrate an interdisciplinary approach; (2) draw on theory and scholarship in women’s studies and gender studies; and (3) reflect the intentional use of feminist methodologies in practice.

Gender & Sex: Difference and Similarities, PSYC 238/WSGS 238
What are the psychological and behavioral differences between men and women? What is the origin of these gender differences? How do they affect the lives of men and women in work, relationships, etc.? This class will engage psychological research and theory to examine the influence of gender on the lives of men and women. Emphasis will be placed on understanding gender as a social psychological construct.

Globalization and Its Discontents, WSGS 397/ANTH 361
(Previously named Passages: Migration through Gender and Culture)
This course provides a gender-focused overview of the contemporary Global Era, post-1990. Culture, both as a category of analysis and as a mode of expression and production, will be our primary lens. Topics we will examine include neoliberalism, refugee and diaspora configurations, consumption practices, transnational social movements, the War on Terror, the Global City, human trafficking, and the global trade in sex work. We will be especially attentive to how these global processes shape - and are shaped by - gender practices at the local level. Students will select semester research projects in consultation with the Instructor.

History of Feminist Thought, WSGS 330
This course focuses on the history and development of feminist thought and the impact of feminism on the general U.S. culture. It consists of intensive study of the various ways feminists have envisioned social, political, and cultural inequality. Readings span the history of feminist writing from the early 15C to the early 21C. Although writings include authors from throughout the world, the primary focus is on western feminist history.

History of U.S. Sexuality; HIST 392/WSGS 320
This course provides a historical introduction to sexual behaviors and attitudes in the United States from the colonial period to the present. The primary emphasis concerns the impact of social and political change on sexual norms and behavior. Particular attention is paid to changing standards of sexual morality and their effect upon the structure and organization of the American family and physical intimacy over the past three and one-half centuries. As the American population and its institutions changed, so did the boundaries of sexual behavior and ideology. This course seeks to discover and define those evolving boundaries and thereby better comprehend the ongoing transformation of the family, sexuality and personal identity in the United States. Since sexual behavior, ideas and identity define much of the current political and social landscape of the United States, those issues will be studied in their historical context. The course is chronologically structured and interwoven with topical themes, beginning with the colonial period and ending with contemporary America. The more important topics include changing gender roles and their impact on sexual relationships, courtship and marriage, the evolution of birth control and abortion, the role of medicine and politics in defining appropriate norms and forms of sexuality, the rise of sexology as a scholarly discipline, social communities and subcultures defined by alternative sexual behaviors, and so-called "deviant" forms of sexuality.

Inequality in Society; SOCL 250/WSGS 250
An examination of the process and resulting structure by which people become differentiated from one another and arranged in graded strata with varying degrees of wealth, power, and prestige. Emergence and maintenance of social classes, class conflict, social mobility, and changes over time in the system as a whole. Attention will be given to the most influential classical traditions dealing with stratification as well as to modern theories.

Introduction to Women’s Studies and Gender Studies, WSGS 101
This course introduces students to the interdisciplinary fields of both Women’s Studies and Gender Studies, which explore the ways in which sex and gender manifest themselves in social, economic, cultural, and political arenas. It draws upon scholarship in women’s and feminist studies, masculinities studies, and queer studies, fields that in turn draw upon a variety of intellectual perspectives or disciplines, including history, psychology, rhetoric, sociology, literary studies, and biology, among others. Students will use gender-based theory to look at the ways in which gender identification and representation influences individuals and societies.

Issues in Feminism, WOST 201
Gender is one of the primary ways that people, both historically and now, attribute identity and distribute power. It is a key element in defining human relationships. It has often been used to subjugate one sex, usually women. This course is designed to introduce students to ways in which gender can be understood as a social construction and the results of that construction. At the end of this course, students will have a better understanding of feminist theory and feminism as a socio-political perspective on social change. Students will be more attuned to what it means to be male or female in society. No less importantly, students will be equipped with concepts and skills that will enable you to appreciate the capacities and contributions of both women and men. 

Queer Theory; WSGS 380
This course maps the field of queer theory from an interdisciplinary perspective in order to cover a wide range of theoretical and disciplinary approaches (race theory, transnational theory, postmodernism, Latino American Studies) and interpretative applications (film, literature, pop culture), which reflect the professors’ fields of expertise and scholarship. The course is divided into three modules: foundational theories, interdisciplinary applications; and iconography, film, and popular culture. The ‘queering’ nature of the course makes its interdisciplinary approach open to both ‘high culture’ (cultural theory, literature, film) and ‘low culture’ (music, mass media) and is designed to break boundaries, including national ones, beyond dominant cultural heteronormativity. Given the multifaceted and global approach to queer studies, the course will host a variety of guest speakers from different disciplines at LUC (Pr. Marcela Brusa) and other local (writer Achy Obejas), national (Dr. Pablo Ben) and international locations (Dr. Michael K. Schuessler). To further highlight its interdisciplinary approach, the course envisions final collaborative projects in which students are encouraged to explore different disciplinary and analytical tools, as well as media. For this reason, the course is specifically designed to complement the studies of advanced students in various disciplines (English, Modern Languages and Literatures, Women’s Studies and Gender Studies, Latin American Studies, International Studies, Sociology, among others) and with a background in critical theory and a strong interest in queer theory, transnationalism, Latin@ American Studies, and (trans)cultural studies.

Mass Media and Popular Culture, SOCL 123/WSGS 123
The purpose of this class is to develop critical tools for the analysis of mass media and popular culture. Mass media and popular culture are often treated as a given, a backdrop for everyday life. Our attempt will not be to merely describe forms of modern culture, to present their history, but to develop an understanding of how it impacts our lives, to engage in a critical analysis. This process will not just involve reading books and articles but also watching TV news, film and other non-verbal signs. We are going to develop novel ways to "read" popular culture and mass media for what it may tell us about the sociology of everyday life and for the manner in which race, class, and gender are socially constructed. Specifically, we will focus on the construction of male and female gender roles within a wide variety of media sources. In addition, both race, class and political economy will be examined in the production of media representations. We shall also dealing with how news stories are "framed," as well as the theories that inform this critical approach to media. Finally, we shall examine the panic over digital media and children.

Rebels and Reformers in U.S. History, HIST 381 
This course examines the history of radicalism and reform in the United States from the antebellum period to the 1960s, with particular focus on the anti-slavery, women’s rights, populist, and civil rights movements.  In addition to studying the origins, formation, and outcomes of movements, we will evaluate how gender, class, and racial dynamics created the circumstances for reform and rebellion.

Sociology of Sex and Gender; SOCL 271/WSGS 271
The purpose of this class is to develop critical, sociological tools for an analysis of how society is organized around sex and gender, with a specific focus on how gender intersects with race, class and sexuality. In this class, we ask important questions about what gender is, how we become gendered beings, and how our lives are impacted by our genders. We will explore how sociology moves beyond biology in understanding sex and gender, in addition to exploring various social institutions (education, workplace, family, etc.) and how they operate to maintain and/or challenge gender norms. We will place a special emphasis on the media as a location that shapes our understandings of gender, and further, how it can be a location for advocating change. Ultimately, we explore how gender at the micro level is shaped, constrained, enabled, and challenged, in addition to how it is challenging to, macro level structures.

Studies in American Literature: Race, Gender, and Sexuality in U.S. Latina/o Literature, ENGL 379-095/WSGS 379
This course will examine how race, gender, and sexuality intersect in contemporary texts by U.S. Latina and Latino writers (Chicana/o, Puerto Rican, Cuban American, and Dominican American, in particular). We will consider the range of formal and aesthetic modes used by these writers as we analyze the politics of identity that their texts imply.  Expect intense discussion about topics such as cultural nationalism, language, mestizaje, masculinity, feminism, and queerness.  Assignments will include regular in-class exercises, three formal papers, and an in-class presentation.  The authors we will study include Oscar “Zeta” Acosta, Arturo Islas, Gloria Anzaldúa, Cherríe Moraga, Piri Thomas, Judith Ortiz Cofer, Cristina García, and Junot Díaz. 

Theater Workshop: "Writing Women's Lives" THTR395/WSGS 395
This course is an introduction to feminist and gender-based theories of dramatic criticism and theatrical performance practice. We begin with an introduction to feminist theatre criticism and practice and an overview of scholarship on gender and performance. This is followed by a survey of texts by female playwrights, including Hrosvitha, Hildegaard Von Bingen, Aphra Behn, Susan Glaspell, Lillian Hellman, Lorraine Hansberry, Caryl Churchill, Maria Irene Fornes, Pam Gems, Anna Deveare Smith, Karen Finlay, Sarah Kane, and Susan Lori-Parks. The second half of the semester will be devoted to active application of theories and performance forms covered in the introduction. The final for this class will be a first draft of an original dramatic piece or performance. Students will create an original performance piece applying one or more of the principles covered to their own creative practice. As a source of material for these projects we will access the collections of the Gannon Center for Women and Leadership Archives. Students will create plays texts of any sort, including one-person shows, from the lives of the men and women whose personal papers are housed in the archives. Students in the course will also participate in the triptych of plays about women in Catholicism written be Loyola playwrights. There are no prerequisites for this course. Theatrical experience is helpful but not required. Men and women are equally encouraged to enroll

Women, Art, and Society
Wisotzski
This course will examine feminist art history, the image of woman and women artists in Western art from the Renaissance to the present. 

Women, Diaspora, Community, WSGS 201
The course examines the wide range of cultural expressions and community cultural resources available for women as they migrate in developed countries such as Europe and the US. It highlights how the diaspora global movement produces material and cultural changes that ultimately transform gender relations and diaspora communities at large. The course opens with a general understanding of the economic, political, and social indicators affecting women's family life, their motherhood practices, their access to the labor market, their sexuality, and their religious faith. The course pays particular attention to literacy, language acquisition, and written and visual expression as a means by which migrant women acquire visibility, prestige, and cultural agency as individuals and members of their communities. In the final part of the course students will examine the cases of local (Chicago-based) communities and real-life stories, as well as written texts, in order to analyze the role played for women in diaspora by communal networks, literacy programs, writing practices, and literary and artistic expression.

Women, Labor, and Poverty, PHIL 398 (Capstone Seminar)
This seminar-style course is designed for senior Philosophy majors needing a capstone course. Majors in Women's and Gender Studies are also invited to register if they have at least 6 hours in Philosophy; for all students, some knowledge of classical texts in political philosophy is desirable. The focus of the class will be an examination of the theoretical background of Marxist and socialist feminism in conjunction with issues relating to women and labor. We will be reading some classical theoretical texts, including Engels, Origin of the Family, Private Property, and the State and selections from Marx' 1844 Manuscripts on the alienation of labor. As well, we will be discussing selected papers by contemporary feminist scholars such as Alison Jaggar, Heidi Hartman, and Susan Okin on issues relating to women and labor in developed economies.   

Women in Literature: Deconstructing the Diva, ENGL 283-13W/WSGS 283
Revered and reviled, imitated and appropriated, divas are perhaps the most visible women in our culture. On the one hand, as a woman who stares down cameras and sings loudly and unabashedly, the diva represents empowerment: she is loud, courageous, and often outrageous. On the other hand, the diva is also a figure of extreme appropriation: consumed and absorbed into people’s lives, she is the object of obsessive fandom. In shaping her own identity, the diva often serves as a vehicle for shaping others’. Through fiction, drama, biography, autobiography, film, and performance theory, this class will explore the paradoxes and problems of the “woman with a voice” and her place in contemporary conceptions of femininity.

Women in Literature, ENGL 283
Although women have participated in, been affected by, and written about war as long as there has been writing (or war), war literature is still perceived as a man's domain. This course will examine the contention that war is a man's issue by analyzing the role of women in 20th and 21st-century war fiction. We will look at representations--by both men and women--of women in WWI, Vietnam, and more recent conflicts. Course materials include historical and critical texts, short stories, novels, films and a graphic novel. We will analyze literature's form, voice, and purpose and will learn to contextualize fiction in its particular political, ethical, social and technological era. Requirements include two short (4 pp) papers, one long (8 pp) final paper, which will have a small research component, and a midterm. This course fills the post-1900 requirement.

Women in Literature: Transgressive Identities, ENGL 283-202/WSGS 283
To paraphrase a famous question, what happens when people stop being polite and start being transgressive? Whose idea of “woman” (and, inevitably, “man”) is challenged by transgressive identities? What kinds of borders and boundaries do such identities cross? This course will introduce students to important ideas and developments in feminist thought, including the work of Gloria Anzaldúa and Eve Sedgwick, as well as a variety of canonical and non-canonical 20th- and 21st-century texts and film.  Requirements include regular written responses to the reading, two short papers (2-3 pages), a longer paper (5-6 pages), and a final exam.

Women in Literature: Illness and Gender, ENGL/WSGS 283
The topic of illness was chosen since it is a frequent motif in literature and since it highlights several important themes for Women’s Studies and Gender Studies.  Illness is often stigmatized as a sign of weakness or invoked as contagion to justify fears of outsiders.  Our experiences of illness are shaped by cultural expectations, gender norms, eroticism, and spiritual beliefs.  Women have a particular relationship to illness through their stereotypical roles as suffers and as familial caregivers.  The course will explore those themes, among others.

Women in Literature: Contemporary Memoir, ENGL 283-14W/WSGS 283
Memoir, as a literary genre, has garnered much critical attention in the last decade (both positive and negative). But what exactly is memoir? What characteristics does it have that are different than fiction, or straight non-fiction and autobiography? If an author is writing from memory, and oftentimes memory is hazy, or at the least subjective, what is the 'truth' in memoir? Is there any material or issue that is still considered taboo when women write about their lives? These are some of the questions we will address during the semester while reading a selection of creative non-fiction memoirs by a wide range of contemporary female writers. One of the themes we will investigate is the concept of secrets and silence that pervade many of the texts we will focus on. Some writers may include: Patricia Hampl, Maxine Hong Kingston, Mary Karr, bell hooks, Kathryn Harrison, Marjane Satrapi, Alice Sebold, Jill Christman, and Anne Fessler. Cross listed with Women’s Studies, English 283 is designed to meet the “literary knowledge and experience” requirements of the Loyola Core. Focusing on literature written by 20th century women authors, this course is designed to help students gain knowledge of women’s lives and writings; to show them the difference gender makes to the writing, reading, and interpretation of literature; to train them in the analysis of literature; and to teach them how to describe, analyze, and formulate arguments about literary texts.

Women and Politics from a Comparative Perspectives, PLSC 300/WSGS 355
In many countries women hold 30-40% of the major political positions and female heads of state are increasingly common; on the other hand there are countries (such as the United States) where there has never been a female head of state and representation is far lower. Why are women so poorly represented in some countries? Does political representation matter? We spend time on both of these questions looking at explanations for the considerable variation in women's access to positions of formal political power across countries The course will also look at the impact women have when they are in office. That is, does it really matter what level of representation women have and in what manner does policy output change when women are present. The course considers these questions not just in the developed countries, but also in the developing world.

Women in Religion: Spirituality (writing intensive), THEO 178/WSGS 278
This course will examine how core beliefs and practices in various religious traditions influence the identities, roles, and experiences of women in those traditions. Our attention will be centered on what is unique in women’s spiritual practices and experiences, and what women have uniquely contributed to their religious and spiritual traditions. Along the way, we will critique religious systems with respect to the experience of women by investigating ways in which religions hold women in particular esteem due to their gender, ways in which women are oppressed in their traditions, how these two things often occur simultaneously, and what this implies for women’s spirituality. Finally, we will explore how wider cultures perceive women within different religious traditions, and how those perceptions shape women’s spiritual experiences and expressions.

 

 

Graduate Courses

Feminist Methodologies/Foundations of Women's Studies; WSGS 402
Over recent decades, issues of gender and sexuality have become integral parts of the academic enterprise. This class investigates how ideas about women, gender and sexuality have developed, paying particular attention to how education and knowledge itself have defined gender. Three foundational dimensions of feminist practice studied are consciousness of inequality, critical analysis of structures of inequality and transformation of consciousness and structures from inequality to mutuality. Topics include the history of the exclusion of women from the academy; the exclusion of women's writings from various academic disciplines and canons; the history of women's education; the intellectual history of women's studies as an interdisciplinary force within the academy; and feminist theories, methods and methodology.

Global Feminisms; WSGS 450 (Not offered in Spring 2013)
WSGS 450 will focus on Asian Feminisms (special emphasis on postcolonial/postmodern/ poststructuralist thought) and incorporate extensive content about China (including Japan, Phillipines), Indian subcontinent, and Muslim Women. The course will also incorporate lectures and discussions on suitability and application of different feminist thought to sub groups of women from across the globe. The focus will be to examine global needs of women and social interventions in a feminist/womanist/identities frame of reference. The course material includes feminist writings, fiction from and about women (primarily Asia); and documentaries, in addition to lectures and presentations.

Queer Theory; WSGS 497-001
Héctor Garcia and Cristina Lombardi-Diop
This graduate level course maps the field of queer theory from an interdisciplinary perspective in order to cover a wide range of theoretical and disciplinary approaches (race theory, transnational theory, postmodernism, Latino American Studies) and interpretative applications (film, literature, pop culture), which reflect the professors’ fields of expertise and scholarship. The course is divided into three modules: foundational theories, interdisciplinary applications; and iconography, film, and popular culture. The ‘queering’ nature of the course makes its interdisciplinary approach open to both ‘high culture’ (cultural theory, literature, film) and ‘low culture’ (music, mass media) and is designed to break boundaries, including national ones, beyond dominant cultural heteronormativity. Given the multifaceted and global approach to queer studies, the course will host a variety of guest speakers from different disciplines at LUC (Pr. Marcela Brusa) and other local (writer Achy Obejas), national (Dr. Pablo Ben) and international locations (Dr. Michael K. Schuessler). To further highlight its interdisciplinary approach, the course envisions final collaborative projects in which students are encouraged to explore different disciplinary and analytical tools, as well as media. For this reason, the course is specifically designed to complement the studies of advanced students in various disciplines (English, Modern Languages and Literatures, Women’s Studies and Gender Studies, Latin American Studies, International Studies, Sociology, among others) and with a background in critical theory and a strong interest in queer theory, transnationalism, Latin@ American Studies, and (trans)cultural studies.

Ethnicity, Race and Culture: Diversity in Human Experience; SOWK 502/ WSGS
Elective as taught by Priscila Freire This foundation course provides an introduction to ethnic and racial inter-group relations and cultural diversity, with an emphasis on the four largest communities of color in the United States: Native Americans, African Americans, Asian Americans, and Latinos. Students will have an opportunity to examine diversity across and within groups along the following dimensions: gender, class, cultural values, family structure, group history, sexual orientation, and migration history, level of acculturation, color, language, and religion/spirituality. These cultural components will be discussed in relation to the institutions of the larger society to these groups. Implications for practice with individuals, families, and communities are examined, as are policy and research implications, With its focus on communities of color and culturally responsive practice, this course builds on the knowledge regarding human behavior and development over the course of the life span, social policy, and social work practice presented in other foundation courses

Studies in American Literature: Race, Gender, and Sexuality in U.S. Latina/o Literature; ENGL 379-095
Suzanne Bost
This course will examine how race, gender, and sexuality intersect in contemporary texts by U.S. Latina and Latino writers (Chicana/o, Puerto Rican, Cuban American, and Dominican American, in particular). We will consider the range of formal and aesthetic modes used by these writers as we analyze the politics of identity that their texts imply.  Expect intense discussion about topics such as cultural nationalism, language, mestizaje, masculinity, feminism, and queerness.  Assignments will include regular in-class exercises, three formal papers, and an in-class presentation.  The authors we will study include Oscar “Zeta” Acosta, Arturo Islas, Gloria Anzaldúa, Cherríe Moraga, Piri Thomas, Judith Ortiz Cofer, Cristina García, and Junot Díaz. 

Intimate Partner Violence; CRMJ 373-001 
Loretta Stalans
The class covers two major perspectives, family violence theories and feminist theories, to critically analyze the prevalence, origins, consequences, and responses to intimate partner violence (IPV) in countries throughout the world. Students reflect upon and obtain a more empathic understanding of the complex situational, societal, and personal considerations surrounding battered persons’ decisions to leave or stay with an abusive partner, to disclose or keep silent about their victimization, and to cope with the blame and shame surrounding IPV. Students discuss and debate controversial issues such as gender and ethnic differences, the role of alcohol and drugs in perpetration of IPV, and the appropriateness and effectiveness of specific policies, prevention efforts, and interventions.

Rebels and Reformers in U.S. History; HIST 381-001
Michelle Nickerson
This course examines the history of radicalism and reform in the United States from the antebellum period to the 1960s, with particular focus on the anti-slavery, women’s rights, populist, and civil rights movements.  In addition to studying the origins, formation, and outcomes of movements, we will evaluate how gender, class, and racial dynamics created the circumstances for reform and rebellion.

Women’s and Gender History: Europe; HIST 441-800
Elizabeth Hemenway
This course seeks to provoke a discussion about the major themes and recent scholarship in women’s and gender history. We will examine a variety of debates about the historical construction of gender, ranging from histories of the body and sexuality, to culture (broadly defined to include class formation and cultural production), to politics (including citizenship rights, activism and policy making), and the economy (including the sexual division of labor and the gendering of workplace and work identities). Focusing on a variety of topics, we will explore how gender identities were produced and contested at specific historical moments. We will also consider how the field of women’s history itself has changed over time as scholars have increasingly focused attention on gender as a category of analysis.

Seminar in Christian Sexual Ethics; THEO 480
Sandra Sullivan Dunbar
This course will examine key approaches to sexual ethics within the Christian tradition, both classical and contemporary. The first third of the course will cover the sexual ethics of three major thinkers in the Christian tradition (Augustine, Aquinas, and Luther) and recent official Roman Catholic teaching on sexuality, in conversation with contemporary thinkers utilizing, revising, and challenging these strands of thought. The second third of the course will examine in-depth two extended contemporary treatments of Christian sexual ethics, by Roman Catholic feminist ethicist Margaret Farley and Protestant womanist ethicist Kelly Brown Douglas. The third and final portion of the course will examine recent scientific, philosophical and theological insights about sexual diversity, intersexuality, and the construction of gender, and ask what these new understandings mean for Christian sexual ethics and understandings of gender. Throughout, we will give close attention to different methods in Christian ethics, as well as use and interpretation of various sources of Christian ethics. Thus the course aims to teach both content and method in Christian sexual ethics.

Hispanic American Novel: Memory and Postmemory in Contemporary Latin American Films; SPAN 480-001
Bernardita Llanos
NOTE: THIS COURSE WILL BE TAUGHT IN SPANISH; INSTRUCTOR CONSENT REQUIRED
This seminar examines the representation of memory and postmemory in various Latin American countries, paying special attention to those that have undergone a violent past due to armed struggles, forced immigration/migration as well as those that have the legacy of dictatorial regimes. We will view and discuss films from Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Cuba, Peru, and México paying attention to individual cinematic strategies used by the directors as well as to the historical experiences of the younger generation today. Using a gender perspective we will analyze the challenges, resistances and ideals portrayed in the visual representations of contemporary Latin American films where remembering takes a central role. Special attention will be paid to how violence, anxiety and desire pervade the experience of these new filmic productions in Latin America where memory is both theme and formal device. The films will be viewed outside class time in the LLRC. In class we will focus on discussing specific sequences and the theoretical cultural readings

 Practicum; WSGS 498
This supervised field experience allows students to work with a women's political, cultural or educational organization or project. It gives students an opportunity to learn about public and private sector responses to women's issues and concerns. Prerequisite: One Women's Studies course. Permission of the Women's Studies program director is required. Students interested in this course should see the director as soon as possible.

WSGS 499-001 (#2518): Independent Study; GPD consent required

WSGS 500-001 (#2519): Thesis Research; GPD consent required

WSGS 595-001 (#2893): Thesis Supervision; GPD consent required

Loyola

Women's Studies & Gender Studies · 6430 N. Kenmore Avenue, Cuneo Hall 310, Chicago, IL 60660
Phone: 773.508.2177 · Fax: 773.508.8492 · E-mail: wsgsprogram@luc.edu

Notice of Non-discriminatory Policy