News Archive

Probation in Illinois Conference Presentation

Dr. Olson and Dr. Stemen presented at the State of Probation in Illinois: Progress, Challenges and Opportunities Framing Conference on September 21, 2018. 

Probation_in_Illinois_Conference_Presentation

 

Research Examines Rise (and partial fall) of Illinois’ Prison Population

Over the past few years, Illinois’ prison population experienced one of the largest decreases seen in the past 40 years. This research brief examines the factors that led to the dramatic rise in Illinois’ prison population during the 1980s and 1990s, as well as the decrease seen in the past few years.

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Center developing county-specific research reports

As part of its effort to support research-informed local criminal justice planning, Loyola’s Center has begun producing county-specific reports that provide an overview of how local justice systems are organized, the extent and nature of crime, and justice agency operations and caseload. See the attached county reports that have been published to date.

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Student Research on Women in Prison

Students in Loyola’s Applied Crime and Justice Research class conducted research examining the factors that contribute to the incarceration of women in Illinois. Their research examined trends in arrests, sentencing, admissions to prison, and recidivism following release from prison. Click here to see their research.

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ICJIA Announces Inaugural Candice M. Kane Lifetime Service Award

Dr. David Olson is the inaugural recipient of the ICJIA Candice M. Kane Lifetime Service Award. The annual award is given to individuals who embody Candice's legacy of humility, innovation, and dedication to improving ICJIA's work.

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Illinois Governor’s Commission on Criminal Justice Reform Issues Recommendations, Loyola to Assist in Implementation of Reform Efforts

The Illinois Governor’s Commission on Criminal Justice and Sentencing Reform released its final report and set of recommendations on Tuesday, January 10, 2017.

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Center takes innovative approach to improving criminal justice system

Loyola’s new Center for Criminal Justice Research, Policy, and Practice brings together experts and students from several fields of study to share resources and insights—with the ultimate goal of creating a criminal justice system that is more fair, effective, and cost efficient.

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UNICEF Chicago honors Diane Geraghty

The United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF) has honored Center Co-Director Diane Geraghty with a Chicago Humanitarian Award for outstanding work on behalf of children and the community.  The September 23rd awards luncheon recognized “extraordinary Chicagoans” who have made significant contributions to children’s lives through their local and international work to end violence, protect human rights, advance civil rights and improve community health.   Diane Geraghty was recognized for her work to establish and direct the Loyola University Chicago Civitas ChildLaw Center.

 

MCJA honors David Olson

Dr. David Olson, Center co-director, received the Tom Castellano Award from the Midwestern Criminal Justice Association for his service to the Association. The award was presented at the MCJA Annual Conference in Chicago on September 23, 2016.  The Midwestern Criminal Justice Association is a regional organization affiliated with the Academy of Criminal Justice Sciences and seeks to foster communication and collaboration among criminal justice researchers, academics, and practitioners.

 

Student research

Diane Cervantes, an undergraduate student and McNair Scholar working with faculty in the Center, participated in a poster presentation at the Midwestern Criminal Justice Association Annual Conference. Her presentation summarized her research on Hispanic inmates released from the Illinois Department of Corrections, and how their characteristics varied by immigration status.

 

Sentencing Reform

Dr. David Olson, Center co-director, participated in a panel discussion on criminal justice and sentencing reform at the Illinois Correctional Association Conference on October 7th in Macomb Illinois.

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Mass Incarceration, Racial Equality and Social Justice

Dr. David Olson, Center co-director, presented a session the Aids Foundation of Chicago symposium on race, politics and restorative justice and the relationship between mass incarceration, racial equality, and social justice in the criminal justice system in October 2016.

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Social Justice and Criminal Justice

Dr. David Olson, Center co-director, collaborated with Loyola’s Center for Urban Research and Learning (CURL) and the Office of Student Transition and Outreach, to develop a Social Justice Dinner Dialog session. Sponsored by the Department of Student Diversity & Multicultural Affairs, this session, titled Crime, Punishment and Redemption, continued the dialog surrounding the “Just Mercy” first-year text This event was held on September 26th at Loyola’s Lake Shore Campus.

 

Communications and Criminal Justice

On September 2, 2016, Dr. David Olson, Center co-director, made a presentation to journalism students in Loyola’s School of Communication to discuss some of the emerging issues related to crime and justice system reform. The presentation was designed to stimulate ideas for the students’ writing and stories that will be featured in the School of Communication’s “Mosaic” magazine. Mosaic is a student developed and produced annual magazine that highlights specific issues, and this year’s focus will be on violence in Chicago.

 

Student Orientation

Dr. David Olson, Center co-director, collaborated with faculty from the Departments of History and Psychology, as well as staff from Loyola’s Office of Student Transition and Outreach, to develop a First-Year Text Discussion Lunch for faculty and staff to discuss “Just Mercy” by Brian Stevenson. This event was held in August 2016 and was attended by more than 60 Loyola faculty and staff.

 

Stopping “Crossover” from Maltreatment to Delinquency and Crime

CCJ Program Manager Lisa Jacobs presented two sessions at the 2016 Illinois Judicial Education Conference to provide Illinois judges with research, data and practice models for improving outcomes and public safety when youth become “dually involved” in child welfare and juvenile justice (delinquency) systems. The Education Conference is convened by the Illinois Supreme Court to provide a wide range of judicial education and skill development resources for the state’s associate, circuit and appellate judges.

Ms. Jacobs provided a research profile of dually involved youth and the pathways from maltreatment or neglect to delinquency system involvement and future criminal justice involvement and national efforts to assist courts in reducing reoffending, improving youth and family outcomes and addressing the complex issues arising when youth are dually involved. For more information about the RFK National Resource Center and the Dual Status Youth Practice Model.

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Emerging Adults and the Criminal Justice System: Charting the Course for Policy and Practice

Nearly 200 criminal justice and community stakeholders convened in February 2016 19th for the inaugural conference of Loyola’s new Center for Criminal Justice Research, Policy and Practice.

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Reducing Jail Populations, Improving Local Justice Systems

The John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation has announced nearly $25 million in support for ambitious plans to create fairer, more effective local justice systems across the country. The Foundation is awarding grants of up to $3.5 million each to 11 jurisdictions to reduce their jail populations and address racial and ethnic disparities in their justice systems.

On April 13th, the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation announced nearly $25 million in support for ambitious plans to create fairer, more effective local justice systems across the country. The Foundation is awarding grants of up to $3.5 million each to 11 jurisdictions to reduce their jail populations and address racial and ethnic disparities in their justice systems. An additional nine jurisdictions, including Cook County, Illinois,  will be given $150,000 grants to continue their reform work and to participate in a growing, collaborative network of cities, counties, and states driving local justice reform. The grants are part of the Safety and Justice Challenge, a national initiative supported by the Foundation with an initial $75 million to reduce over-incarceration by changing the way America thinks about and uses jails.   For more information, see http://www.safetyandjusticechallenge.org/