Loyola University Chicago

Center for Urban Research and Learning

archive

Kimberly Ocampo, CURL's First Kale Williams Scholarship Recipient

Kimberly Ocampo, CURL

We are pleased to announce that Kimberly Ocampo, a senior majoring in Education and Spanish, has been selected as CURL’s first Kale Williams Scholarship recipient. Kim has been a key member of the CURL team since joining us in the summer of 2016. As an undergraduate fellow at CURL, Kim has been involved in several of our projects including “Jane Addams Senior Housing Bill of Rights” a project that collected stories from senior housing residents which Jane Addams Senior Caucus will use to advocate for better senior housing policies in Chicago.  She also worked on “The Encampment,” a report about the experience of the permanently housed, former residents of the tent encampments under Lake Shore Drive. 

Kim is a native of Chicago and a graduate of Cristo Rey Jesuit High School. After she graduates in May of 2018, she plans to work as a Spanish teacher here in Chicago. As a first generation college student, she has already contributed to educating others through her role as a College Coach in the Summer Scholars Program at Loyola University.

We believe that Kim is a fitting recipient for the scholarship named after our friend and colleague, Kale Williams. Throughout his life, Kale was committed to working collaboratively to better the many communities that he called home. His commitment to fair housing, civil rights, non-violence, and a more just and fair society for all continue to inspire us in our work. This scholarship – still in its early stages – is already contributing to keeping Kale’s work and legacy alive.  If you would like to contribute to this scholarship fund, please click here to learn how.

Congratulations to Kim Ocampo on this scholarship!

CURL's New Director

CURL

Dear Friends,

We are pleased to announce the appointment of David Van Zytveld as the next Director of the Center for Urban Research and Learning (CURL) at Loyola University Chicago. 

David came to Loyola in 1995 as a graduate student and began to work as a researcher at CURL’s predecessor, the Policy Research Action Group (PRAG). When CURL began in 1996, he joined the Center’s original team of faculty, staff, graduate students, and community partners. 

Over the years, David has had a variety of roles including Community Research Coordinator and Assistant Director. Since 2008, he has been the Associate Director and, for the last 14 months, the Interim Director.

David notes: “I am honored to be appointed to this new role and I am eager to continue the great collaborative work of so many who have been doing this work over the years. We have a marvelous foundation that Phil Nyden and others have built and now we will do our best to work together in building into the future.” 

Please join us in congratulating David on his appointment!

CURL Director Phil Nyden retiring

CURL Director Phil Nyden retiring

After serving as CURL Director for 20 years, at the end of this academic semester (Spring 2017) I will be completing my phased retirement from Loyola. I will be continuing my work on selected projects over the following year until fully retiring in summer 2017. I have thoroughly enjoyed working with the many staff, faculty, students, and community colleagues over my two decades at CURL (and 37 years at Loyola University). We have all built CURL into a distinctive, successful, and vibrant collaborative university-community research center. I am looking forward to watching CURL and its partners continue work addressing social justice issues in upcoming years. I know that I will continue to be in touch with many of you in the years ahead.

 

-Phil Nyden

Higher Education: Collateral Damage in the Budget Battle

Higher Education: Collateral Damage in the Budget Battle

Please join the Center for Tax and Budget Accountability, the Office of the Provost and the Center for Urban Research and Learning at Loyola University as we delve into these issues.  This will take the place of our Friday Morning Seminar. 

  • Overall, state funding for Higher Education in FY2016 was cut by $1.318 billion or 67.9% from FY2015 levels.
  • Illinois Monetary Award Program (MAP) Grants help low income and frequently first generation students attend college. That help, however, is being cut significantly as appropriations for MAP Grants in 2016 were reduced by 53.5%from the previous year. As a result, over 160,000 eligible applicants were declined MAP Grants in FY2016.
  • Illinois colleges and Universities are struggling to remain competitive for top scholars:
  • Illinois students enroll in other states and take their tuition dollars with them. Illinois lost 16,461 students to other states in 2016.
  • Faculty will not come to Illinois or remain in Illinois when the financial situation is so uncertain. When they leave, they take their research dollars with them.
  • Colleges and Universities are often the largest employer in the area. When colleges and universities lay off staff, or cannot keep salaries competitive, local economies suffer.

Panelists:

  • Tom Cross, Chair, Illinois Board of Higher Education
  • Jauwan Hall, UIC Student Trustee
  • Ralph Martire, Executive Director, Center for Tax and Budget Accountability
  • John Miller, President, University Professionals of Illinois, Local 4100
  • Kyle Westbrook, Executive Director, Partners for College Completion

There is no charge for this event; however, registration is required. CLICK HERE.

Friday, January 27, 2017
8:30 am: Registration 9:00 am - 11:00 am: Program

Loyola University
Kasbeer Hall – 15th Floor, Corboy Law Center
25 East Pearson, Chicago, 60611

Recent Publications

The first chapter was co-written with Christine George from CURL, Julie Hilvers from Roosevelt University, and Arturo Bendixen from AIDS Foundation of Chicago titled, "HIV Housing Helps End Homelessness and HIV/AIDS in the United States" within the book Understanding the HIV/AIDS Epidemic in the United States. The book is part of the series Social Disparities in Health and Health Care.  Read the chapter here. 

The second chapter was co-written by Christine George from CURL, Julie Hilvers from Rosevelt University and Susan Grossman from Loyola's School of Social Work.  They contributed a chapter titled, "Older Women at the Edge: Economic Disparities of Older Women." The chapter was published in the eBook, Older Women: Current and Future Challenges. Read the chapter and the contributions of many other Loyola colleagues.

Immigration: The Long Walk to Freedom

Lawrence_Benito

Thursday March 26 | 7:00PM  
Mundelein Auditorium
Lake Shore Campus

Lawrence Benito, immigrant rights activist and CEO of Illinois Coalition for Immigrant and Refugee Rights (ICIRR) and former CURL Graduate Fellow discussed his ongoing work with ICIRR to promote more just immigration reform policies both locally and nationally. 

70 Acres in Chicago: Cabrini Green. Film Screening and Panel Discussion

Film screening and panel discussion 70 Acres in Chicago

Former Cabrini Green resident Mark Pratt at the Cabrini rowhouses (Photo: Cristina Rutter)

Join us for a film screening and panel discussion for 70 Acres in Chicago: Cabrini Green. Shot over the course of 20 years, the film documents this upheaval, from the razing of the first buildings in 1995 to the clashes in the mixed income neighborhoods a decade later. The film tells the volatile story of this contested patch of land while looking unflinchingly at race, class, and who has the right to live in the city.

A conversation with Director Ronit Bezalel will follow.  

The event is free and open to the public. 

Date: Wednesday, February 24, 2016:
Time: 6:30pm to 9:00pm; Registration and Light Refreshments Begin at 5:45pm
Presenters: Ronit Bezalel and Panelists
Location: Loyola University Lakeshore Campus: Damen Student Center Cinema
2.5 CEUs/CPDUs

Presented by Loyola University Chicago School of Social Work
Co-sponsored by the Center for Urban Research and Learning
and Carolyn Farrell, BVM, Professor of Women and Leadership, Gannon Center

Music-based Services for Young People Experiencing Homelessness

Brian Kelly

Brian Kelly an Assistant Professor with the School of Social Work at Loyola University Chicago, presented the findings of his research with youth and recreational music production through a local youth agency.  To view a copy of his presentation, click here: Brian Kelly Presentation.  To listen to the audio documentary produced through the research, click here

Explore research connections with the Jesuit university in Cali, Columbia

Columbia

Faculty and graduate students attended a working seminar on Monday, September 15 to explore potential research and exchange connections with Pontificia Universidad Javeriana – Cali, a Jesuit university in Columbia.  Dr. Teresita Sevilla a sociologist at Javeriana discussed possible connections between university-community work parallel in Chicago and Cali. 

For more information, download the PowerPoint of the presentation: Sevilla CURL Presentation September 2014

If you are interested in further collaborative research opportunities, please email Phil Nyden at pnyden@luc.edu 

Eminent Domain Exhibition at LUMA in partnership with CURL: Panel Discussion and Reception

Wasserman

Panel Discussion

Tuesday April 12 | 4:30 - 5:30PM  
Simpson Hall, LUMA
Water Tower Campus

Join us for a panel discussion of the issues of social justice and the "greater good" as raised in these cases where land was taken by eminent domain.

Panel:

  • Richard Wasserman, Photographer
  • Lenny D. Asaro, Attorney at Law, Neal & Leroy, LLC
  • Larry Bennett, Professor of Political Science
  • Philip Nyden, Professor of Sociology and Director of CURL, LUC 

Opening Reception

Tuesday April 12 | 5:30- 7:30PM
Simpson Hall, LUMA
Water Tower Campus

Join us to celebrate the opening of the exhibition: Richard Wasserman: Community Uprooted: Eminent Domain in the U.S.

Both events are free and open to the public. To learn more about LUMA, visit http://www.luc.edu/luma/

The Case for Reparations: A University Response

ta-nehisicoates

Tuesday March 31 | 6:30PM  Mundelein Auditorium 
Lake Shore Campus

Ta-Nehisi Coates, National Correspondent for The Atlantic and winner of the 2014 George Polk Award for Commentary, spoke about his cover article, "The Case for Reparations".  A panel discussion followed.  

Panel:

  • Anita Thomas, Associate Professor in School of Education, LUC
  • Billy Lamar Brooks Sr., Director of YouthLAB@1512, Better Boys Foundation
  • Juan PereaProfessor of Law, LUC

Read more about the talk in the Chicago Reader here

View more photos from the event on our Facebook page here

 

  


Tuesday March 31 | 11:30AM
Kasbeer Hall, Corboy Law Center
Water Tower Campus

Ta-Nehisi Coates presented at Corboy Law Center.  

 

Sponsored by:

Center for Urban Research & Learning
Water Tower Campus Life
School of Law
Department of Student Diversity & Multicultural Affairs
School of Education
Carolyn Farrell, BVM, Professorship in Women and Leadership
School of Communication
Institute of Pastoral Studies
Quinlan School of Business
Provost Office for Social Justice Initiatives
Department of Sociology

Advance Healthy Homes & Healthy Communities

Advance Healthy Homes & Healthy Communities

June 19th, 2014: A day-long summit to develop a blueprint for the City and County to advance a healthy homes agenda.  For more information, visit the summit webpage, Advance Healthy Homes & Healthy Communities Summit.

CURL’s Community Partnerships Featured in Jesuit Video

CURL research from 1998 HUD study finding renewed interest

CURL HUD research

CURL’s past research on what produces stable racially, ethnically, and economically diverse communities is of renewed interest to policy makers following the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development’s new rules aimed at addressing persistent segregation in America’s cities. The full issue of HUD’s journal Cityscape was dedicated to the report results can be read here. This continues to inform policy makers and community activists.  Media coverage of the new HUD rules is available here.

Catherine Gillis Wins Horowitz Foundation Research Award

Catherine Gillis Wins Horowitz

Congratulations to CURL Graduate Fellow Catherine Gillis who just received a Research Award from the Horowitz Foundation for her ongoing work on the Detroit land bank and urban redevelopment in that city.

The Horowitz Foundation explains that the purpose of the award is to support policy-oriented research in the social science community, and alert major foundations and academic institutions to the importance of social science scholarship with policy outcomes.

Kale Williams Award 2015

Kale Williams Award 2015

Leah Durst-Lee and Emily Nethercott, Kale Williams award winners

Leah Durst-Lee and Emily Nethercott have been named as recipients of the 2015 Kale Williams Award for Exceptional Work in Promoting Human Rights and Social Justice. Each year this award is given to two CURL undergraduate or graduate fellows who exemplify the work and ideas of .

Leah Durst-Lee

Leah has been working with CURL since May 2014 and has effectively coordinated our project with the Chicago Metropolitan Battered Women’s Network. The Battered Women’s Network is a collaborative membership organization dedicated to improving the lives of those affected by domestic violence through education, public policy, advocacy, and direct connections to service provides. One of our CURL staff members noted that Leah has “singlehandedly restructured the project to get it off the ground.” 

 

Emily Nethercott

Last summer as part of a Women’s Studies Project, Emily got involved with ongoing work at Deborah’s Place. For over 30 years Deborah’s Place has been working to break the cycle of homelessness among women in Chicago through provision of supportive services and a variety of housing options. Since Fall 2014, Emily has been a CURL Undergraduate Fellow and a stalwart in working with our community partners. Most notable is Emily’s work with the Family Court Enhancement Project, which is an initiative of the Cook County Domestic Violence Court.

CURL Hosts Successful Events

CURL_hosts_events

Coates event, Mundelein Auditorium, March 31, 2015

This March CURL hosted two events with speakers addressing the issues of immigrant and racial justice: Lawrence Benito and Ta-Nehisi Coates.‌‌

Learn more about Lawrence Benito's talk on March 26th here

Learn more about Ta-Nehisi's visit to Loyola on March 31st here

Explorations of Neighborhood Designs Promoting Equity, Democracy, and Livable Communities

Talen

Posters by Emily Talen
Urban Planner
Professor, Arizona State University

Meet Dr. Talen and hear her talk about her work
CURL Friday Morning Seminar
Friday, February 20th 10:30am
Cuneo Hall, 417
Students and general public are invited

See her posters
Damen Hall, Second Floor, Lake Shore Campus
February 10th-25th

David Van Zytveld Wins the 2014 Megs Langdon Award

David award

David Van Zytveld, our Associate Director, was the 2014 recipient of the Megs Langdon (Person for Community) Award annual Staff Excellence and Recognition Awards Ceremony.

The award is given annually to the staff member who has consistently made a significant positive impact beyond the Loyola, and within the person's larger community. The award recognizes an exemplary colleague who is universally recognized for his or her community service, including but not limited to; leadership, commitment to social justice, and ability organize community members.

It is an honor to all of us at CURL to have David recognized for his very impressive work with hundreds of students and community partners in his two decades of shaping CURL’s mission and impact.

Chicago Ethnography Conference

Chicago Ethnography Conference

CURL is sponsoring two sessions at the 17th Annual Chicago Ethnography Conference on March 14th. The 2015 conference theme is “The Worlds of Ethnography: Critical Perspectives and Social Justice.” The CURL sessions are: “Encountering Urban Poverty” and “Spotlight on Collaborative Qualitative Research.”

More information on the conference is available at https://chicagoethnography.wordpress.com/

New CURL Study on Expanding Housing Opportunities

New CURL study on expanding housing opportunities

In partnership with the Washington DC-based Poverty & Race Research Action Council and the Metropolitan Milwaukee Fair Housing Council, the Center for Urban Research and Learning released a national report, Take a Chance on Me: A Review of the Milwaukee County Security Deposit Assistance Program in January 2015. Researched and authored by Loyola sociology professor Peter Rosenblatt and CURL Graduate Fellow Jennifer Cossyleon, the report provides evidence that security deposit incentives do help in encouraging low-income families to move to new mixed-income communities providing greater educational, employment, and quality of life opportunities. This has implications for national policy as well as practices in all U.S. cities.

http://prrac.org/pdf/MilwaukeeCountySecurityDepositStudy.pdf

Xiaoling Ang, Economist at US Consumer Financial Protection Bureau

CURL Alum Speaker Series

Former CURL Undergraduate Fellow, Xiaoling Ang, visited campus in October to speak about her current work on student loans.  Ling Ling, a math and economics major at Loyola is an economist with the US Consumer Financial Protection Bureau.  She her PhD in economics at Princeton University.  

Journal of Poverty -- Christine George and Jennifer Chernega Co-Edit a volume

Journal of Poverty

CURL Research faculty, Christine George, and former CURL Fellow, Jennifer Chernega, co-edited a special edition of the Journal of Poverty  titled Housing the Homeless: Emerging Research on Programs and Policies.  Within the issue they also published an article, “Works in Progress: Searching for Solutions to the Difficulty Problems of Homelessness.” Click here to view the journal. 

Evaluation of security-deposit assistance program for low-income residents in Milwaukee.

Milwaukee

Loyola University sociologist Peter Rosenblatt is the lead researcher on a new CURL project to examine a security deposit assistance program in Milwaukee that uses the incentive to encourage low-income residents to move to higher opportunity, lower poverty neighborhoods. Funded by the Washington DC-based Poverty Race Research Action Council, CURL will partner with the Metropolitan Milwaukee Fair Housing Council in completing this project. Findings will be of value to fair housing organizations and local governments throughout the country as they seek to increase housing options and related economic and social opportunities for low-income residents.

Fefu and Her Friends: Performance as a Method of Interdisciplinary Inquiry

Upcoming Friday Morning Seminar

This Friday Morning's Seminar: 
Fefu and Her Friends: Performance as a Method of Interdisciplinary Inquiry

Friday, March 15th, 2013 | 10:30 am -12:30 pm ** Special Time!** | Piper Hall, 1st Floor **Special Location!** |

Loyola University Chicago faculty members participating in the Women’s Studies and Gender Studies Research Seminar will present “‘Fefu and Her Friends': Performance as a Method of Interdisciplinary Inquiry.” Last year the seminar explored performance as a methodology of interdisciplinary inquiry through staging of a full length play, “Fefu and Her Friends” by Maria Irene Fornes, performed by eight of the faculty members of the Seminar. This project investigates the unique capacity of live performance to manifest interdisciplinary research in an embodied, communal form. At the CURL Friday Morning Seminar, members of the faculty cast and crew will discuss how their specific disciplines interact with the content of the play and the ways in which that content is illumined by the methodology of performance. They also will perform an excerpt of one scene from the play.

Presenters include:

Betsy Jones Hemenway, Director, Women’s Studies and Gender Studies, Department of History

Ann M. Shanahan , Department of Fine and Performing Arts/Theatre

Prudence Moylan, Department of History

Bren Ortega Murphy, Women’s Studies and Gender Studies, School of Communication

Jacqueline Long, Department of Classical Studies

Mary Dominiak, School of Nursing, Director, Undergraduate Health Systems Management Program

Hector Garcia, Department of Modern Languages and Literatures

Susan Grossman, School of Social Work

Kale Williams Award 2014

Kale Williams Award 2014

Risa Visina and Michael Janusek have been named as recipients of the 2014 Kale Williams Award for Exceptional Work in Promoting Human Rights and Social Justice. Each year this award is given to two CURL undergraduate or graduate fellows who exemplify the work and ideas of Kale Williams.

Kale Williams served as senior scholar in residence at CURL for ten years. Through his volunteer work at CURL, as well as through his human rights advocacy throughout his life, Kale has served as a model for everyone around him. Following service in the Navy in World War II he became a pacifist and worked with the American Friends Service Committee organizing projects to address injustice including interventions in Chicago’s low-income communities, assistance to Native Americans in the Southwest, feminine relief in the Nigeria-Biafra civil war, and opposition to the Vietnam War.

In Chicago he worked with Dr. Martin Luther to bring about fair housing opportunities for all citizens regardless of race, ethnicity, religion, or income. After the 1966 open housing marches, Kale helped to found the Leadership Council for Metropolitan Open Communities, an organization for which he served as executive director for over 20 years. After service there, he was invited to Loyola University Chicago as Visiting Professor of Applied Ethics. It was after this visiting professorship that he became the Senior Scholar in Residence at the Center for Urban Research and Learning.

This award is a reminder that this spirit and commitment continues at CURL through the work of you and all of the faculty, staff, student, and community colleagues in CURL research projects.

This end-of-the-year award is distinct from the Kale Williams Scholarship Fund for which we are actively fundraising to create year-long scholarships for undergraduate students.

What if Hewlett and Packard had started a band instead?... Music scenes as economic clusters and their broader implications for urban economies.

November 8th FMS

This Friday Morning's Seminar:  
What if Hewlett and Packard had started a band instead?... Music scenes as economic clusters and their broader implications for urban economies.” 

Friday, November 8th | 10:30 am -12:00 pm  | Cuneo Hall, 417

Michael Seman: Doctoral Candidate in Urban Planning and Public Policy at the University of Texas at Arlington will be presenting.

Using Denton, Texas' internationally recognized music scene as a starting point, this seminar will offer a better understanding of the structural dynamics and potential economic externalities of a music scene. Discussion will detail the level of competition and cooperation amongst scene members, how the process of innovation unfolds, the role of public and quasi-public goods in scene development, and a scene's value as catalyst for urban economic development. 

Join us for bagels, coffee and discussion!  For more information about this speaker: http://www.michaelseman.com/

 

Kale Williams Award 2013

Kale Williams Award 2013

Congratulations to Maureen Sullivan, CURL Undergraduate Fellow, who was awarded the 2013 Kale Williams Award for Exceptional Work in Promoting Human Rights and Social Justice from CURL.

Kale Williams served as senior scholar in residence at CURL for ten years. Through his volunteer work at CIRL, as well as through his human rights advocacy throughout his life, Kale has served as a model for everyone around him. Following service in the Navy in World War II he because a pacifist and worked with the American Friends Service Committee organizing projects to address injustice including interventions in Chicago’s low-income communities, assistance to Native Americans in the Southwest, feminine relief in the Nigeria-Biafra civil war, and opposition to the Vietnam War.

In Chicago he worked with Dr. Martin Luther to bring about fair housing opportunities for all citizens regardless of race, ethnicity, religion, or income. After the 1966 open housing marches, Kale helped to found the Leadership Council for Metropolitan Open Communities, an organization for which he served as executive director for over 20 years. After service there, he was invited to Loyola University Chicago as Visiting Professor of Applied Ethics. It was after this visiting professorship that he became the Senior Scholar in Residence at the Center for Urban Research and Learning.

Kale’s steadfast work in promoting human rights and social justice certainly motivated students, staff, and faculty who had the privilege of working with him at CURL. This award is a reminder that this spirit and commitment continues at CURL through the work of you and all of the faculty, staff, student, and community colleagues in CURL research projects.