Loyola University Chicago

Diversity and Inclusion at Loyola

Diversity Courses

Diversity and the Core

 
Course NumberCourse NamePre-requisites
HIST 103 American Pluralism HIST 101/HIST 102

This course is an introduction to history as a discipline, and an analysis of the origins, development and structure of the United States as a pluralistic and multiracial society from 1609 to the present. 
Outcome: Students will be able to demonstrate historical knowledge, draw links between the American experience and national identities, and to develop critical thinking and communication skills.

HIST 104 Global History Since 1500 HIST 101/HIST 102

This course deals with the emergence of the modern world, including such topics as the expansion and intensification of cross-cultural interaction; imperialism, colonialism, and nationalism; the spread of information; capitalism, industrialism, and popular sovereignty; race and ethnicity, gender, and socio-economic status. 
Outcome: Students will be able to evaluate and explain the forces of historical continuity and change; demonstrate how the encounters/changes between and among societies produced the world we have today; analyze and discuss the significance of primary and secondary sources and how they relate to the history under discussion.

 
Course NumberCourse NamePre-requisites
ANTH 107  Ancient Worlds None
This course explores the cultures and civilizations that rose and fell in our distant past; its coverage is global in character and historical in content. 

Outcome: Students will understand the varied geographical, historical, and cultural contexts in which ancient civilizations rose and fell.
HIST 208 East Asia Since 1500 HIST 101/HIST 102

This course explores the roles and contributions of China, Japan, and Korea from the sixteenth century to the present tracing such themes as nationalism, capitalism, socialism, imperialism, war, peace, race, and gender struggles. 

Outcome: Students will demonstrate an ability to evaluate and explain the forces of historical continuity and change; understand the relationships among historical events, cultures and social forces; analyze and discuss the significance of primary and secondary sources.

HIST 209 Survey of Islamic History HIST 101/HIST 102

The course will introduce the historical development of Islamic civilization and the formation of Muslim social and political institutions from the 7th century to the present. 

Outcome: Students will be able to demonstrate knowledge of the historical development and diversity of Islamic beliefs, practices, and institutions in varied regional contexts and historical periods.

HIST 210 Introduction to Latin American History HIST 101/HIST 102

This course explores the formation of modern Latin America by examining the region as a global nexus where ideologies, cultures, peoples, and political entities have conjoined and clashed from the fifteenth century to the present. 

Outcome: Demonstrate and ability to evaluate and explain forces of historical continuity and change. Demonstrate an understanding of the relationships among historical events, culture and social forces. Differentiate between students' values and ways of understanding the world & those of other cultures.

HIST 213 Introduction to African History HIST 101/HIST 102

This course surveys the history of Africa from dynastic Egypt to post-colonialism.  The primary focus of this class is to examine the interactions African peoples had with non-Africans from the 15th century to the present. 

Outcome: Engage in critical thinking skills and disposition. Engage communication skills and sensitivities. Possess a heightened understanding of diversity in the world.

 
Course NumberCourse NamePre-requisites
ENGL 282 African-American Literature UCLR 100
This course focuses on the development of the African American literary tradition from the emergence of the slave narrative to the contemporary present.
Outcome: Students will be able to discuss the significance of major African American literary movements and the contributions of representative writers from these periods.
ENGL 292 South Asian Literature and Civilizations UCLR 100

An introduction to South Asian literatures and civilizations, from ancient to contemporary times, with attention to social institutions, religious practices, artistic achievements, literature, and modern challenges.
Outcome: Students will gain an understanding of the cultures and civilizations of South Asia.

LITR 238 Arabic Literature in Translation UCLR 100

This course is a survey of Arabic literature in translation with a focus on continuity and change, influence, and major trends, themes, and genres.
Outcome: Students will gain a foundational knowledge of literature in the Arabic language.

LITR 245 Asian Masterpieces UCLR 100

This course will study masterpieces of Asian literature in a variety of literary genres in their cultural context. 
Outcomes: Students will gain a significant understanding of how Asian literary works reflect their Asian cultural context.

LITR 280 World Masterpieces in Translation UCLR 100

This course will study literary masterpieces, in translation, of a selected culture or nation. 
Outcome: Students will gain an appreciation of the literary masterpieces of another culture or nation

 
Course NumberCourse NamePre-requisites
ANTH 101 Human Origins UCSF 137
Introduction to biological anthropology and anthropological archaeology--those portions of the discipline concerned with human prehistory and our continuing development. Reconstruction of the human career based on fossil and artifactual evidence of human biological and cultural change over time, as well as primate behavior and human genetics. Consideration of alternative theories of human biological evolution and the emergence of culture, humanity's unique ecological niche. Application of the scientific method to excavated data. Use of the comparative framework provided by contemporary primates in formulating hypothesis about early human adaptation.
ANTH 103 Biological Basis for Social Behavior UCSF 137

Draws from the biological sciences, ethology, and anthropological primatology in order to introduce a modern set of perspectives to which the elaborate patterns of human behavior may be compared, contrasted, and analyzed. Emphasis on the study of animal behavior in the context of its applicability to the understanding of human behavior.

ANTH 105 Human Biocultural Diversity UCSF 137

Study of the relationships between human biological diversity and adaptation through out the world. Scientific approaches to the concept of human variation, how genetic differences may have evolved, and the effects of genetics and different environments on the human body will be examined. Topics include adaptation to stressors (e.g., high altitude, nutritional, heat, cold, overcrowding, and infectious disease), polymorphisms and genetic disorders, blood groups and evolution, and the concept of races and alternative approaches to the understanding of human variation. Analysis of the dynamic interactions between biology and culture to understand the adaptations that present populations possess in order to survive in less than ideal conditions.

ANTH 106 Sex, Science & Anthropological Inquiry UCSF 137

An introduction to the study of sex and gender in physical anthropology. Students will study: recent anthropological theories concerning the role of sex in human adaptation, evolution, biology and behavior; the history of physical anthropological thought concerning sex and gender; and the roles and contributions of women scientists.

 
Course NumberCourse NamePre-requisites
ANTH 100 Globalization and Local Cultures none

This course is a study of cultural diversity on a global scale, and provides a comparative perspective on the investigation of humans as cultural and social beings.

PLSC 102

International Relations in an Age of Globalization

none

Competing perspectives on international politics and global issues such as North-South relations, human rights, war and peace, population growth, and environmentalism. 
Outcome: Students will be able to demonstrate an understanding of the main approaches to the study of international politics and to analyze and assess such major substantive issues as interstate war, terrorism, arms control, international political economy and sustainable development.

PSYC 100 Psychological Perspectives on the Experience of Globalization none

Globalization from a psychological perspective. Applying core psychological concepts, research and theory to cross-cultural issues of behavior and development. Topics may include human rights of children, human trafficking, immigration, moral issues of international trade, parenting across cultures. 
Outcomes: Students will learn basic concepts and theories and apply them to real-world globalization problems.

SOCL 101 Society in a Global Age none

This is a foundational course in the social sciences which explores the effect of globalization on everyday life in the United States and elsewhere, using the basic perspectives and methodologies of sociology.

WSGS 101 Introduction to WSGS none
This is an introduction to the interdisciplinary fields of both Women's Studies and Gender Studies which explore the ways that sex and gender manifest themselves in social, cultural, and political arenas. It draws upon scholarship in women's studies, masculinities studies, and queer studies which themselves draw upon a variety of intellectual perspectives, including historical, psychological, rhetorical, sociological, literary, and biological.

Outcome: students will demonstrate understanding of historical developments, key concepts, theories and themes in women's studies and gender studies, the impact that gender can have on social, cultural, political and economic material conditions.

 

 
Course NumberCourse NamePre-requisites
ANTH 102 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology ANTH 100, PLSC 102, PSYC 100 or SOCL 101
This course addresses how multiple factors (beliefs, rituals, social structure, economic structure, political structure) integrate to define culture in the broad sense and how and why they vary among individual cultures (societies).
Outcome: Students will be able to demonstrate the skills and knowledge necessary to investigate the importance of culture and its variation.
PSYC 238 Gender and Sex Differences and Similarities ANTH 100, PLSC 102, PSYC 100 or SOCL 101

Overview of psychological research and theory concerning differences and similarities between genders.  
Outcome: Students will understand similarities and differences between genders, comprehend the diversity of ideas about gender and how ideas of gender are determined by societies and cultures.

PSYC 275 Social Psychology  

Introduction to the field of social psychology; including topics such as social cognition, impression formation, social influence, attitude formation and change, stereotyping and prejudice, aggression, pro-social behavior, and group behavior. 
Outcome: Students will demonstrate the ability to think critically about fundamental theoretical approaches within social psychology, scientific methods of hypothesis testing, and potential applications of social psychology that address real-world problems.

SOCL 121 Social Problems ANTH 100, PLSC 102, PSYC 100 or SOCL 101

This course is an opportunity to examine major issues facing society.  In addition to analyzing the roots of social problems, the course addresses social policy concerns and explores solutions.
Outcome: Students will be able to critically examine the impact of a social problem and its possible solutions, to integrate knowledge gleaned from a variety of disciplines, to find and utilize relevant data and research in defining issues and solutions, and to view social problems from macro and micro perspectives as a means of applying workable solutions for the issues facing society.

SOCL 122 Race & Ethnic Relations ANTH 100, PLSC 102, PSYC 100 or SOCL 101
This course examines the development of cultural, society, and self-understanding by exploring the social construction of race in the United States. The course explores how social constructions of race affect interpersonal relations, laws, policies, and practices in various racial and ethnic communities.
Outcome: Students will be able to demonstrate understanding of the conditions which have worsened racial tensions as well as how social movements have been successful at eradicating racially oppressive laws and working towards a just society.
SOCL 125 Chicago: Growth of a Metropolis ANTH 100, PLSC 102, PSYC 100 or SOCL 101

This course explores the development of Chicago metropolitan region from the 1830's to the present day.  Students will explore the urban area not only through texts, but also through fieldwork.
Outcome: Students will be able to demonstrate understanding of the geography, history and people of the Chicago metropolitan region.

SOCL 145 Religion and Society ANTH 100, PLSC 102, PSYC 100 or SOCL 101

This course examines how religion and society interact. 
Outcome: Students will be able to demonstrate understanding of how individual behavior, organizations, and society as a whole are affected by religious ideas and institutions, and how religion is itself changed by its encounter with changing social circumstances.

SOCL 171 Sociology of Sex & Gender ANTH 100, PLSC 102, PSYC 100 or SOCL 101

This course explores the social organization of sex and gender. 
Outcome: Students will be able to situate their pre-conceived experiences of the naturalness of gender in a particular historical and cultural context.

WSGS 201 Contemporary Issues in Women’s Studies and Gender Studies ANTH 100, PLSC 102, PSYC 100 or SOCL 101

This course explores issues to women's studies, feminism, and gender studies from the perspective of a particular discipline, depending on the faculty member teaching the course. This may, for example, include Communication, English, History, Sociology, or Theology. Students will examine the subjects of women and gender, as well as the challenges of conducting feminist or gender scholarship, within the discipline and how new research changes or transforms that scholarship. 

 
Course NumberCourse NamePre-requisites
THEO 107 Introduction to Religious Studies  

The course explores religion as a significant part of human experience and introduces the student to the description and analysis of various forms of religion.

Outcome: Students will be able to analyze and interpret various ways in which religious traditions intersect with contemporary issues, such plural and conflicting ethical behaviors, the creation of social roles and organizations, the impact of religious perspectives on the political and economic order, and the mutual influence of religion, culture and language.

 
Course NumberCourse NamePre-requisites
THEO 203 Social Justice and Injustice  

This course will focus directly and in depth on racial-ethnic and socio-economic inequalities that various communities experience specifically wealth-poverty disparities, gender/sex inequalities, policing, healthcare, immigration and systemic discrimination against religious and other minorities.

THEO 204 Ethics and the Ecology Crisis  

This course engages issues of diversity of peoples, economic classes, religious groups and vast differentials in nations and classes in terms of their respective ecological footprints and their relative contributions to climate change.

THEO 272 Introduction to Classical Judaism THEO 100 or THEO 107

An investigation of the central affirmations of Judaism: monotheism, the covenant peoplehood of the Jews, the revelation of the divine commandment, the ideas of the prophets, as well as the study of the Sabbath, the festival observances and ritual. The course will also include a study of modern Judaism-the orthodox, conservative, reform and reconstructionist traditions.

Outcome: Students will be able to name and discuss some of the most important Jewish scriptures, articulate the general outline of the historical evolution of Classical Judaism, and define and discuss key concepts, terms, values, and religious practices foundational to Classical Judaism.

THEO 276 Black World Religions THEO 100 or THEO 107

This course explores the revelatory manner in which the divine comes to unique presence and expression among African peoples throughout human history. It will examine the religious experiences and traditions of: Africa's ancient Nile valley civilizations, long recognized as cradling the world's spiritual and philosophical wisdom and as influencing the formative development of Judaism, Christianity, and Islam.

Outcome: Students will demonstrate their knowledge of African peoples' religious experiences within their various historical and cultural contexts.

THEO 278 Women & Religion  THEO 100 or THEO 107

This course will explore, in the light of both eastern and western religious traditions, the nature of women's religious experiences, the ways in which women have been perceived and described in the major religious traditions, and the ways in which women have functioned as significant religious figures, the connections between cultural assumptions and attitudes toward and beliefs about women.

Outcome: Students will be able to demonstrate understanding of the influence of religion on gender roles, and how women in the contemporary world are reinterpreting their religious traditions.

THEO 282 Introduction to Hinduism THEO 100 or THEO 107

An introduction to various dimensions of the religion that Western scholarship has labeled, "Hinduism"organized around three spiritual disciplines recognized by the Hindu tradition (action, knowledge, and devotion). Range of topics, such as the concept of the person, social structures, forms of ritual, philosophical and mystical impulses, myths and images associated with the major gods and goddesses of the Hindu pantheon, devotionalism, and sectarian divisions. The religious and spiritual lives of both men and women, and of both high-caste and low-caste Hindus.

Outcome: Students will be able to demonstrate understanding of the most important Hindu scriptures, the general outline of the historical evolution of Hinduism, the key Hindu concepts, terms,

THEO 295 Introduction to Islam THEO 100 or THEO 107

An introduction to the religion of Islam through the study of major religious ideas, movements, and figures prominent in the development of the tradition. The course covers three major phases: basic teachings of Islam, the articulation of the classical tradition, and contemporary developments. Major issues such as unity and diversity within Islam, Islamic government, the role of women, Muslims in America, and Islamic movements in the contemporary world will also be featured.

Outcome: Students will be able to demonstrate understanding of the most important Muslim scriptures, the general outline of the historical evolution of Islam, the key Islamic concepts, terms, values, and religious practices, and the diversity within Islam in terms of sectarian, regional, and historical developments.

THEO 297 Introduction to Buddhism THEO 100 or THEO 107

The rise and development of Theravada, Mahayana, and Vajrayana forms of Buddhism in South Asia, Tibet, and East Asia. The life and teachings of the founder, Gautama, the establishment of the Buddhist community, the rise of Buddhist monasticism, the spread of Buddhist ideas from India to other parts of Asia, and the development of a variety of Buddhist sects. The various texts, institutions, beliefs, and practices associated with each of the three main forms on Buddhism.

Outcome: Students will be able to demonstrate understanding of the most important Buddhist scriptures, the general outline of the historical evolution of Buddhism, including its different major branches, and the key Buddhist concepts, terms, values, and religious practices.

THEO 299 Religions of Asia  

An introductory survey of selected teachings, institutions, and practices of the great religious traditions of South Asia and East Asia placed in historical context.

Outcome: Students will be able to demonstrate understanding of the central texts, beliefs, ethical understandings, and practices of at least three Asian religions.


Additional Diversity Courses By Department

Classical Studies Diversity Courses
Course NumberCourse NamePre-requisites
UCLR 100-03C Interpreting Literature none

The foundational course of literary studies will require students to read closely and analyze carefully a representative variety of prose, poetry, and drama, master key literary and critical term, and explore a variety of core critical approaches to the analysis and interpretation of literature. This section focuses on issues of identity, class, and gender in the ancient Greek and Roman world.

 

CLST 273G Classical Tragedy--Women/Gender Focus UCLR; no pre-requisites for those with a declared major or minor in the Department of English, Department of Classical Studies, or Department of Modern Languages and Literatures.

This course introduces students to extant Greek tragic drama, especially through the works of Aeschylus, Sophocles and Euripides, with a special focus on concerns of women's studies and gender studies.

 

Courses in History
Course NumberCourse NamePre-requisites
HIST 300D Movement Soundtracks No pre-requisites required

This course focuses on the history of African American popular music over the course of the 20th and early 21st centuries from Bessie Smith to Beyonce and Solange. 

HIST 300E Gender and Sexuality in Modern Africa No pre-requisites required

This course takes an interdisciplinary approach to consider gender and sexuality in modern Africa from the colonial era to the present. 

HIST 380 Introduction to African-American History No pre-requisites required

Surveys of African American history often narrate a journey from "slavery to freedom" or end with the Civil Rights Movement. But a key question motivating this course is: How should the conceptualization of an African American history survey respond to the issues animating Black Lives Matter? Thus, we will pay special attention to the historical dynamics of anti-black violence and African-Americans' relationship to the justice system. We will explore how these issues have intersected with gender, sexuality, class, social movements, the arts and expressive culture, and politics.

Computer Science Diversity Courses
Course NumberCourse NamePre-requisitesSyllabiCriteria
COMP 111 History of Computing None Click Here Class, disability, gender, race, religion, non-western cultures, interdisciplinary

This course will provide a venue for students to learn about history through the evolution of number systems and arithmetic, calculating and computing machines, and advanced communication technology via the Internet. Students who take this course will attain a degree of technological literacy while studying core historical concepts. Students who complete this course will learn the key vocabulary of the computing discipline, which is playing a significant role in modern human though and new media communications. The History of Computing will be organized around the historical perspective. The relationships between social organization, intellectual climate, and technology will be examined and stressed.

 

COMP 250 Introduction to Scientific and Technical Communication COMP 170: Introduction to Object-Oriented Programming (coreq or prereq) or COMP 150: Introduction to Computing Click Here Class, disability, gender, race, religion, interdisciplinary

This required foundation course for the new BS majors the Department of Computer Science is intended to provide students with the knowledge and skills in writing, presentations, and other forms of technical communication expected of them in their future roles as science and technology professionals. The course covers the following topics: principles of organizing, developing, and writing technical information; forms and conventions common to scientific and technical disciplines; presentation of technical information to various audiences; principles and techniques of oral presentations; computer-aided visual presentation techniques. This course is officially approved for writing-intensive credit.

 

COMP 312 Free/Open-Source Computing COMP 251: Introduction to Database Systems or COMP 271: Data Structures Click Here Class, disability, gender, race, interdisciplinary

This course will cover the fundamentals of Free and Open Source software development. Topics to be addressed include licensing, Linux, typical software development tools (e.g. compilers, scripting languages, build tools, and version control software), applications, and techniques for managing remote servers. Students will work on a significant development project involving free and open-source software and learn how to participate in open-source projects effectively.

 

COMP 317 Social, Legal, and Ethical Issues in Computing None Click Here Class, disability, gender, race, religion, non-western cultures, interdisciplinary

This course will explore a variety of ethical and legal issues facing those who use or program computers. Issues can be divided broadly into professional ethics, dealing with the ethical responsibilities of the programmer, and social issues, dealing with concerns we all have as citizens. Students will be able to understand laws and issues in areas such as privacy, encryption, freedom of speech, copyrights and patents, computer crime, and computer/software reliability and safety; understanding of philosophical perspectives such as utilitarianism versus deontological ethics and basics of the U.S. legal system.

 

COMP 341 Human-Computer Interaction COMP 271: Data Structures Click Here Disability, non-western cultures, interdisciplinary

This course studies the interaction between humans and computer-based systems. The course will provide students with the methods for evaluating, designing, and developing better interfaces between humans and systems. Students will acquire an awareness of different design and evaluation methods as well as practical, effective, and cost-conscience methods for improving systems and their interfaces.

 

COMP 386 Computational Neuroscience COMP 150 or COMP 170 or Instructor Consent Click Here Disability, gender, race, interdisciplinary

Introduces computational methods to understand neural processing in the brain. Levels of representation from low-level, temporally precise neural circuits to systems-level rate-encoded models, to information-theoretic approaches. Emphasis on sensory systems, primarily vision and audition, most readily demonstrating the need for such computational techniques. Students will be able to appreciate many aspects of neuroscience that cannot be understood without appropriate mathematical or computational frameworks, and ability to adeptly apply these frameworks in the various domains of neuroscience.

 

COMP 390 Broadening Participation in STEM (Computing, Math & Science) None Click Here  Class, disability, gender, race, interdisciplinary

Students will learn about underrepresentation of various population groups in STEM fields (science, technology, engineering, mathematics), as well as some of the reasons and negative effects of this situation. They will learn about techniques and educational materials for ameliorating this situation and will engage in relevant service learning activities. Students gain first-hand experience with broadening STEM participation and seeing how they can make a difference in the lives of other students and contribute to national needs.

 

Institute of Environmental Sustainability Diversity Courses
Course NumberCourse NamePre-requisites
ENVS 363 Sustainable Business Management ENVS 283 & MGMT 201

To introduce students to the emerging field of sustainability in business and the growing focus on the social, environmental, and economic performance of businesses.   The course presents the scientific, moral, and business cases for adopting sustainability.  

 

ENVS 284 Environmental Justice No pre-requisites required

This course examines how policy and its implementation interact with race and class to affect differentially people’s access to a clean, safe, and productive environment. It reviews the history of the environmental justice movement in the U.S., specific case studies of environmental injustice, and community, policy, and legal responses. We also will examine diversity across multiple dimensions of identity. Through social analysis and self‐reflection, students will enhance their cultural competency and ability to work across diverse social groups to advance environmental justice and sustainability.

 

ENVS 383 Human Dimensions of Conservation No pre-requisites required

This course focuses on the human dimensions of biodiversity conservation. We will examine theories and research from the fields of anthropology, sociology, political science, psychology, and economics that apply to conservation. Examples of topics that might be covered include: values, beliefs, attitudes, and behaviors; common pool resources; political, psychological, sociological, economic, and cultural factors influencing conservation; Indigenous and local knowledge; stakeholder engagement, collaboration, and community-based conservation; and basic methods of human dimensions inquiry.

 

Philosophy Diversity Courses
Course NumberCourse NamePre-requisitesSyllabi
PHIL 308 Islamic Philosophy Most 300-level courses have a prerequisite of two core philosophy courses. Click Here

This course covers the development of classical Islamic philosophy from 800 to 1200 AD. Attention will be given to the central topics (God, the cosmos, knowledge, the human good) with which Muslim philosophers were concerned.

 

PHIL 322 Perspectives on Women Most 300-level courses have a prerequisite of two core philosophy courses. Click Here

Rights, duties, and virtues of the human as an individual and as a member of society; the basic human societies of the family and the state; social justice; international society; war and world order.

 

PHIL 324 Topics in Ethics Most 300-level courses have a prerequisite of two core philosophy courses. Click Here

This course is about African Philosophy.

 

PHIL 326 Political Philosophy Most 300-level courses have a prerequisite of two core philosophy courses. Click here

Topics for these courses have included African American Phil, African Phil, Phil of Race, and Feminism. Students should see the designated topic for a given semester.

 

 PHIL 335  Asian Philosophy  Most 300-level courses have a prerequisite of two core philosophy courses. Click Here

A study of fundamental tenets of major Eastern philosophies (Chinese, Japanese, Indian) in comparison to Western tradition.

 

PHIL 389 Contemporary Issues Most 300-level courses have a prerequisite of two core philosophy courses. Click Here

Topics for these courses have included African American Phil, African Phil, Phil of Race, and Feminism. Students should see the designated topic for a given semester.

 

PHIL 468 Topics in Ethics This is a graduate level course. Click Here

Topics for these courses have included African American Phil, African Phil, Phil of Race, and Feminism. Students should see the designated topic for a given semester.

 

PHIL 480 Social and Political Philosophy This is a graduate level course. Click Here

Topics for these courses have included African American Phil, African Phil, Phil of Race, and Feminism. Students should see the designated topic for a given semester.

 

PHIL 484 Philosophical Anthropology This is a graduate level course. Click Here

Topics for these courses have included African American Phil, African Phil, Phil of Race, and Feminism. Students should see the designated topic for a given semester.

 

Psychology Diversity Courses
Course NumberCourse NamePre-requisitesSyllabi
PSYC 100 Psychological Perspectives on the Experience of Globalization  None Click Here

Focuses on globalization from a psychological perspective. applying core psychological concepts, research and theory to cross-cultural issues of behavior and development. Topics include human rights of children, human trafficking, immigration, moral issues of international trade, parenting across cultures. 

 

PSYC 225 Psychology of Peace  None Click Here

Application of psychological theories, concepts, and research to issues of peace and conflict. Areas covered include international conflicts and international peacebuilding (including war, terrorism, and global environmental issues) as well as interpersonal conflicts and conflict resolution (including crime, family violence, and conflict arising from prejudice and perceived threat). Classic theories of peace are also analyzed and connected to psychological theory and research.

 

PSYC 235 Psychology of Human Sexuality  PSYC 101 Click Here

Sexuality as an important aspect of human functioning and its integration into the total person will be emphasized.   Topics include sexual anatomy and physiology, gender identity and roles, attraction and love, sexual orientation, human reproduction, sexual development, sexual dysfunction.

 

PSYC 238 Gender and Sex Differences and Similarities  ANTH 100, PLSC 102, PSYC 100 or SOCL 101 for students admitted to Loyola University for Fall 2012 or later.  No requirement for students admitted to Loyola prior to Fall 2012 or those with a declared major or minor in the Department of Anthropology, Department of Criminal Justice, Department of Economics, Department of Psychology, Department of  Political Science, the Department of  Sociology, Human Services or the School of Nursing. Click Here

Overview of psychological research and theory concerning differences and similarities between genders.

 

PSYC 340 Psychology of Women PSYC 101 Click Here

Review of psychological aspects of women's experiences. Topics include psychological aspects of biological events such as menarche, pregnancy, menopause; aspects of women's work and family roles; and mental health issues relevant to women.

 

PSYC 360 Understanding Prejudice  PSYC 101 Click Here

Prejudice from a psychological perspective. Applying psychological concepts, research, and theory to understand the origins and consequences of prejudice as well as potential remedies. 

 

PSYC 371 Psychology of Political Behavior PSYC 101 Click Here

Examination of the determinants of political judgments and decision; including topics such as voting preference, stereotypes and political thinking, racism and political behavior, ideology and public opinion, the effect of the media on political thought.

 

PSYC 376 Psychology of Religion None Click Here

Introduction to the major issues, theories and empirical approaches in the psychology of religion; effect of religion on beliefs, motivations, emotions and behaviors.

 

PSYC 525 Prejudice and Intergroup Relations Graduate Standing Click Here

This course surveys the empirical research on prejudice, bias, and discrimination, focusing on those factors that contribute to these phenomena and on strategies for reducing/eliminating them.

 

PSYC 560 Human Diversity Graduate Standing Click Here

This course provides a foundation in human diversity as it relates to the practice of clinical psychology. The course will examine theoretical perspectives and research findings related to human diversity. The goal of this course is to challenge students to think critically about the influence of human diversity on their psychological practice, research, and teaching.

 

School of Education Diversity Courses
Course NumberCourse NamePre-requisitesSyllabiOpen to Non-Majors
ELPS 125 Introduction to Leadership Studies None Click Here Yes

This course provides an introduction to the concept of leadership including an exploration of contemporary leadership knowledge and skills that may be utilized in a variety of disciplinary contexts and settings. The course flows through: 1) an exploration of self, 2) understanding self in the context of diverse others, and 3) recognition of broader social systems and ways of influencing them. Two learning experiences are central to this class: service and critical reflection on identity. This is an Engaged Learning course, approved for the Service-Learning category, and thus satisfies the Loyola University Chicago Engaged Learning requirement of CORE.

 

ELPS 219 American Education None Click Here Yes

This course examines the history, aims, organization, and control of public and private schools in the United States. Emphasis is placed on the historical examination of issues of diversity, inclusion and exclusion as they relate to education.

 

ELPS 222 Foundations of Ethics & Justice in Leadership Must be enrolled in the Undergraduate minor in leadership studies Click Here No

The course provides an introduction to  leadership theories as well as critical and ethical frameworks used to interpret, critique, and reconsider these theories. By focusing on critical social perspectives as a tool to deconstruct (and reconstruct) leadership theories, the class will help students develop strategies for advancing leadership focused on social justice and social responsibility. The course represents a deep exploration of social location and the ways in which identity, power, privilege, and oppression shape leadership.

 

ELPS 240 Urban Education: Policy and Practice None Click Here Yes

This course introduces students to some of the central policy questions currently afoot in American public education through consideration of one particular field of concern, Urban Education. The course explores the sociological dimensions of schooling, the important questions of how race, social class and ethnicity impact American education, and the relationship between resources and outcomes that are often at the heart of arguments about what schools should do and be.

 

ELPS 302 Philosophy of Education None Click Here Yes

This course studies major philosophical theories about educational practice, especially as these relate to pedagogical practice, curriculum development, and the response of schools to particular individual, community, and societal interests.

 

TLSC 120 Bridging Language, Learning, & Developmental Theory into Practice Co-requisites TLSC 110 and TLSC 130 Click Here Yes

In this module, students will observe and learn key principles and stages developmental and learning theories via clinical experiences in birth to grade 12 settings (including infant/toddler, preschool, elementary, middle, and high schools).  The primary focus of these experiences is to explore the ways in which physical characteristics, communication skills, cognitive capacities, and social-emotional needs of children be used to understand theory and inform adult-child interaction and developmentally appropriate pedagogical practices in birth to grade 12 settings with both typically and atypically developing children.

 

TLSC 130 Community Immersion  Co-requisites TLSC 110 and TLSC 120 Click Here  Yes

 This module (course) is designed to engage teacher candidates (students) in an authentic exploration of the inherent relationship between public schools and the surrounding community. Teacher candidates (students) are introduced to the concepts of cultural and social capital as they work in small groups to explore a thematic component of these communities.

 

TLSC 140 Teaching, Learning, and Leading for Social Justice  TLSC 130 Click Here  No

 This module (course) builds on candidates' initial explorations of diverse learning environments and continues to develop candidates' understanding of the School of Education's mission of professionalism in service of social justice and the core tenets of culturally responsive pedagogy. Candidates will complete a self-documentation project in which they explore their own identities and recognize how their thinking, behavior, and being are influenced by their own personal experiences, race/ethnicity, social class, language, religion, age, etc.

 

TLSC 150 Constructive Learning Environments for Diverse Students TLSC 130 Click here No

This module (course) deepens teacher candidates' introduction to learning and development through consideration of the importance of healthy learning.

 

TLSC 160 Analyzing Culturally Responsive Classroom Instruction TLSC 130 Click Here No

This module (course) builds on candidates' initial explorations of learning and development and the core tenets of culturally responsive pedagogy as candidates are introduced to backward design and Universal Design for Learning. Candidates will conduct a lesson analysis to assess the effectiveness of a lesson based on established criteria for culturally responsive teaching.

 

TLSC 210 Educational Policy for Diverse Students TLSC 160 Click Here No

This module (course) specifically engages teachers in looking at the policy related to diverse students in schools, particularly language policy (affecting ELLs and bilingual students) and special education policy (affecting students with special needs). Candidates will learn the policies, laws and court cases that impact classrooms, see how educational policies are enacted into classroom practice to support students, and make suggestions on continued ways to improve the achievement of students in urban classrooms and schools. Teacher candidates will explain the role of policy in educational practice, including the role of the teacher in advocating for change within the educational institution.

 

TLSC 220 Individualized Assessment & Instruction for Diverse Students TLSC 160 Click Here No

This module (course) specifically engages teachers in looking at the policy related to diverse students in schools, particularly language policy (affecting ELLs and bilingual students) and special education policy (affecting students with special needs). Candidates will learn the policies, laws and court cases that impact classrooms, see how educational policies are enacted into classroom practice to support students, and make suggestions on continued ways to improve the achievement of students in urban classrooms and schools. Teacher candidates will explain the role of policy in educational practice, including the role of the teacher in advocating for change within the educational institution.

 

TLSC 310 Language and Literacy for Diverse Students TLSC 220 Click here No

This module (course) introduces teacher candidates (students) to essential foundations in teaching reading. Emphasized will be skills developmentally appropriate for the candidate's teaching endorsement level including phonological awareness, phonics, vocabulary, fluency and text comprehension. A balance of instructional practices appropriate for a variety of narrative and informational texts will be included. Students will learn to design and teach lessons, focusing on standards based reading skills to linguistically diverse students, through use of research based reading strategies.

 

TLSC 330 Discipline-specific Literacy for Diverse Students TLSC 220 Click Here No

This module (course) supports teacher candidates (students) in developing their knowledge and skills in teaching and assessing literacy in discipline specific contexts. Emphasized will be the identification and use of culturally responsive texts, evidence based strategies, data based decision making skills and new literacies (technology and online resources) designed to target all students' literacy needs, including those with linguistically diverse backgrounds.

 

School of Social Work Diversity Courses
Course NumberCourse NamePre-requisitesSyllabiOpen to Non-Majors
SOWK 370 Oppression, Priviledge, and Diversity Additional information is in LOCUS    

 

SOWK 502 Oppression, Priviledge, and Diversity Additional information is in LOCUS    

 

SOWK 631 Family Violence Additional information is in LOCUS    

 

SOWK 654 SW Practice Global/Cross Cultural Context Additional information is in LOCUS    

 

SOWK 656 SW with LGBTQ Populations Additional information is in LOCUS  

 

SOWK 661 Migration, Social Justice, Human Rights Additional information is in LOCUS    

 

SOWK 663 Women in a Global Context Additional information is in LOCUS    

 

SOWK 730 Migration and US Policy  Additional information is in LOCUS    

 

SOWK 731 SW and Refugee, Immigrants Additional information is in LOCUS    

 

SOWK 732 Migration, Social Justice, Human Rights Additional information is in LOCUS    

 

 

SOWK 733 North American Migration Dynamics Additional information is in LOCUS  

 

SOWK 734 Social Policy and Older Adults Additional information is in LOCUS    

 

SOWK 632 Social Work with Aged Additional information is in LOCUS    

 

SOWK 618 Religion and Spirituality Additional information is in LOCUS    

 

SOWK 740 Spirituality and Older Adults Additional information is in LOCUS    

 

Sociology Diversity Courses
Course NumberCourse NamePre-requisitesSyllabiCriteria
SOCL 101 Society in a Global Age None Sample syllabi upon request  Cross Listed with African Studies and the African Diaspora

Core Foundational for Social Sciences   -- one of the 4 learning goals is :   Greater understanding of human similarities and differences and the effects of class, ethnicity, gender and race in societies, states and cultures with an appreciation for the value of human diversity.

 

SOCL  122 Race and Ethnicity in Society  2nd tier Societal and  Cultural Literacy Core Sample syllabi upon request  Cross Listed with African Studies and the African Diaspora, Human Services and Peace Studies 

This course examines the development of cultural, society, and self-understanding by exploring the social construction of race in the United States. The course explores how social constructions of race affect interpersonal relations, laws, policies, and practices in various racial and ethnic communities.

 

SOCL 171 Sociology of Sex and Gender  2nd tier Societal and  Cultural Literacy Core Sample syllabi upon request  Cross Listed with Women's and Gender Studies and Human Services 

This course explores the social organization of sex and gender. 

 

SOCL 210 Men, Women and Work None Sample syllabi upon request  Cross Listed with Women and Gender Studies 

This course looks at the nature of work through the lens of gender.  It considers how male and female labor force participation has changed over time.  It examines the ways working families are transformed when women combine employment with domestic responsibilities and child care, or when men's jobs no longer provide a family wage.

 

SOCL 250 Inequality in Society None Sample Syllabi upon request  Cross Listed with Asian Studies, Human Services, Peace Studies, Women and Gender Studies 

This course examines the manner in which contemporary society is divided by race, ethnicity, class, sexuality and gender, and the impact of social institutions on these divisions. An emphasis will be placed on income/wealth differences, status differences, class conflict and social conflict over time.

 

SOCL 252 Global Inequalities None Sample Syllabi upon request  Cross Listed with  Human Services and Global and International Studies 

This course examines inequality on a global scale, focusing on the impact of globalization processes on race, class and gender inequalities here and abroad. 

 

SOCL 280 Topic: American Religious Diversity from a Global Perspective None  Sample Syllabi upon request  Cross listed with Catholic Studies 

The course examines world religions found in the U.S. today -- designed  to explore religious diversity in the U.S. 

 

SOCL 370 Topic: Global Health None Sample Syllabi upon request  Cross listed with Bioethics 

This seminar explores factors that contribute to the unequal distribution of health, disease, and death around the world. Issues include globalization and development; the social determinants of health; the global burden of disease; and global health systems. The focus of this course is on the underlying social, economic, political, and cultural mechanisms driving some of the leading issues in global health today. 

 

Women's Studies and Gender Studies Diversity Courses
Course NumberCourse NamePre-requisites
WSGS 201 Contemporary Issues in WSGS ANTH 100, PLSC 102, PSYC 100 or SOCL 101

This course explores issues to women's studies, feminism, and gender studies from the perspective of a particular discipline, depending on the faculty member teaching the course. This may, for example, include Communication, English, History, Sociology, or Theology. Students will examine the subjects of women and gender, as well as the challenges of conducting feminist or gender scholarship, within the discipline and how new research changes or transforms that scholarship.

 

WSGS 330 History of Feminist Thought first-year coursework

This course focuses on the history and development of feminist thought and th impact of feminism on the general United States culture. It is devoted to an intensive study of the various ways feminist have envisioned social, political, and cultural inequality. Readings span the history of modern feminism in the 18th century to early decades of the second wave in the 1970s. Special emphasis is given to the 20th century and the primary focus is on western feminist history. The course is not exhaustive, nor global, but rather an overview of western feminist thinkers.

 

WSGS 391 Methodologies in WSGS first and second-year courses

Over the last decades, issues of gender and sexuality have become integral parts of the academic enterprise. This class investigates how ideas about women, gender, and sexuality have developed, paying particular attention to how knowledge itself has been defined in terms of gender. The course explores the three foundational dimensions of feminist practice: (1) consciousness of inequality, (2) critical analysis of structures of inequality, and (3) transformation of both consciousness and structures of inequality to mutuality. Topics include a brief history and overview of feminist theory, the search for a feminist epistemology, the assessment of various research methods as employed by feminist scholars, and the actual practice of feminist research.

 

WSGS 398 WSGS Internship first and second-year courses
This course uses supervised project-based experiential learning to allow students the opportunity to apply feminist analysis and practical skills to a student-designed project that will be completed within the timeframe of a course term. 

Outcome:  Students learn application of feminist concepts and principles to pragmatic outcomes; leadership, planning, time management, and assessment skills.

 

WSGS 401 History of Feminist Thought graduate status

A requirement for the WSGS MA, this course focuses on the history and development of feminist thinking since the late eighteenth century and the impact of feminism on western and transnational culture. We will concentrate on some of the important texts of this period and consider their influence on the lived experiences of women. We will also study the various ways feminists have envisioned social, political, and cultural inequality and change. While primary focus of this course is on U.S. and European feminist history, we will place that history within the larger context of feminist thinking and women’s movements around the world.

 

WSGS 450 Global Feminisms graduate status

The course maps the field of global feminist studies and offers critical tools to understand a series of interconnected phenomena (Western material and cultural hegemony and its impact globally, the condition of black and non-Western women and their activism, non-binary and non-normative sexual identities and their rights, transnational and postcolonial female migrations) globally. The course also considers the impact of works by global feminists on issues such as human rights, violence against women and transgender individuals, and sex labor and exploitation. 

 


Additional Diversity Courses By Department