Loyola University Chicago

School of Education

Explore the Program

PhD in Counseling Psychology

  • Gain eligibility to take the Clinical Psychologist licensure examination.
  • Graduate from a program accredited by the American Psychological Association*, meeting all APA standards
  • Develop a deep understanding of cultural diversity and social justice issues.
  • Discipline-Specific Knowledge in the history and systems of psychology, the psychological sciences, measurement, research methods, and statistics.
  • Profession-Wide Competencies as health service psychologists, including knowledge and skills in (a) research, (b) ethical and legal standards, (c) individual and cultural diversity, (d) professional values and attitudes, (e) communication and interpersonal skills, (f) assessment, (g) intervention, (h) supervision, (i) consultation and inter-professional/interdisciplinary knowledge and skills.
  • Knowledge of (a) the history and philosophy of counseling psychology and current professional issues and trends, (b) theories and research on normal human development, and (c) major theories and research in vocational psychology, prevention and outreach, and multicultural and international psychology.
  • Competencies to cases from a counseling psychology perspective, and (b) develop and evaluate interventions to promote positive human development.
  • Knowledge of theories and models of social justice and research that has emanated from these theories and models, and an understanding of how social injustice affects human functioning.
  • Competencies to develop, implement, and evaluate interventions that address issues of social justice.

Prerequisites (33 semester hours)
Ideally students will have completed these courses (or their equivalents) prior to the start of the program.

  • CPSY 420 Counseling Skills
  • CPSY 423 Counseling Theories & Psychotherapy
  • CPSY 425 Assessment in Counseling
  • CPSY 426 Group Counseling
  • CPSY 433 Multicultural Counseling
  • CPSY 440 Practicum in Counseling
  • CPSY 444 Family Therapy
  • RMTD 400 Introduction to Research Methodology
  • CPSY 454 Human Development
  • CSPY 528 Diagnostic Appraisal and Treatment Planning
  • RMTD 404 Introduction to Educational Statistics

Psychology Core (18 semester hours) can be transferred

  • One course on the biological basis of behavior
  • One course on the cognitive basis of behavior
  • One course on the affective basis of behavior
  • One course on the social basis of behavior
  • One course on history and systems of psychology
  • One course on advanced integration

Counseling Psychology Core (18 semester hours)

  • CPSY 424 Career Development and Counseling
  • CPSY 435 Topics: Seminar in Multicultural Psychology 
                        and Social Justice
  • CPSY 527 Prevention, Advocacy, and Outreach: 
                        Community Based
  • CPSY 529 Psychology of Immigration
  • CPSY 530 Research Seminar in Counseling Psychology
  • CPSY 531 Ethical and Professional Issues in Counseling 
                        Psychology

Measurement and Statistics Core (12 semester hours) can be transferred

  • CPSY 450  Research Methods in Counseling
  • RMTD 430 Psychological Measurement
  • 2 additional advanced research methods or statistics courses

Professional Practice Core (18 semester hours)

  • CPSY 442 Doctoral Practicum (2 sections)
  • CPSY 443 Clerkship
  • CPSY 482 Intellectual & Personality Assessment
  • CPSY 535 Seminar in Supervision & Consultation
  • CPSY 536 Supervision Practicum
  • CPSY 532 Advanced Theories in Psychotherapy

Advanced Electives (9 semester hours)
Three additional advanced courses in research methods/statistics, assessment, and/or college-level teaching

A master's degree in counseling, psychology or a related field is required for admission. Completion of the PhD degree in Counseling Psychology requires 69 semester hours of additional coursework beyond the master's degree (some of which can be transferred), written and oral comprehensive examinations, and a dissertation (with oral defense). Students are also required to develop an area of research expertise by engaging in research with faculty throughout their doctoral study. A 2,000 hour pre-doctoral internship is also required.

 

Length of the Program: The program typically takes four to five years of study, including a full-time pre-doctoral internship. Time for degree completion, including the dissertation is six years.

 

Continuous Enrollments: Doctoral students in counseling psychology are required to maintain the status of continuous enrollment during their program of studies. This means that during each semester of each academic year (excluding Summer Sessions), each student must do one of the following (see the current handbook for more information):

  • Enroll in one of the following:
    • At least one course OR
    • CPSY 610: Doctoral Study (maximum enrollment two semesters) OR
    • CPSY 600: Dissertation Supervision
  • A formal leave of absence may be granted upon request and the approval of the Graduate School's Associate Dean.

Practicum: The Chicagoland area provides a wealth of clinical training opportunities for doctoral students in counseling psychology. Approximately half of our students seek training in university counseling centers in the city and suburbs, while the other half receives their clinical and diagnostic training in hospitals and community mental health centers. Students receive a generalist training but through site selection can begin to acquire population-specific competencies in working with children, adolescents, families, veterans, gay/lesbian/bisexual clients and other groups of individuals. Many of the practicum sites also contain APA-approved internship programs where trainees are provided with rigorous supervision and on-site seminars. To discuss typical practicum settings and sites in Chicago and its suburbs, please contact Rufus Gonzales, Practicum Coordinator at  312.915.6378

 

Comprehensive Assessment: Comprehensive take home exam is required. Refer to handbook for more information.

 

Dissertation: Oral defense of the dissertation required. See Formspage for required documents.

 

Degree Conferral: While the commencement ceremony is every May, degrees can be conferred May, August, and December. Students must apply for graduation/degree conferral. Students should apply for graduation in the semester they anticipate completing all degree requirements. Failure to meet application deadlines may result in a delay of the conferral of the degree to the following semester. Applications for Degree Conferral are due:

  • August 1 for December conferral
  • December 1 for May conferral
  • February 1 for August conferral

Please note the degree conferral application is valid for only one semester. If the degree is not conferred for the semester requested, a new application is required for a subsequent semester.

Fall Application Deadline: December 1

A Completed Application Form
You may submit your application form online

 

Official Transcripts
Applicants must submit official transcripts for all undergraduate and any graduate work. To be eligible for admission, your transcript must show an earned a bachelor's degree and a master's degree or an earned bachelor's degree and a master's degree in progress. The master's degree must be in counseling, psychology or a related field. Certified copies of transcripts are acceptable; faxed copies of transcripts are not considered official. If you attended Loyola University Chicago previously, you do not need to request transcripts; we have them on record.

 

Transcripts must show an undergraduate GPA of at least a 3.0 and a graduate GPA of 3.5. In exceptional cases, applicants whose undergraduate GPA is below 3.0 may be admitted. Each program area gives meaningful consideration to the applicant's graduate GPA, GRE scores, recommendations, professional experience and reasons for pursuing a graduate program, as well as to the diversity of the student body.

 

Three Letters of Recommendation
If you supply your recommender’s email address as part of your completed online application form, then your recommendation letters may be submitted online. Or, your recommenders may choose to mail them to:



Graduate & Professional Enrollment Management
820 N. Michigan Ave.
Suite 1200
Chicago, IL 60611



We ask that you submit only three letters, no more, no less. Recommenders may be academic or professional in nature.

 

A Personal Statement
Your statement should be 1-3 pages, and you should describe:

1. Why are you applying to the doctoral program in counseling psychology at Loyola University Chicago?

2. What research and clinical experiences have you had that would prepare you for scientist-practitioner training in counseling psychology?

3. With which faculty member would you most like to work, and why?

4. What is your view or definition of social justice? (We are more interested in learning how you view social justice than in knowing how your life experiences have influenced your view.)

 

Resume 

Standardized Test Scores
Applicants must submit general GRE and psychology subject test scores. Loyola’s GRE institution code is 1412.

Interview
The admissions committee may request an interview. Interviews are by invitation only.

For additional information on billing, payment, and policies, please visit the Office of the Bursar. For information on financial aid and scholarship opportunities, visit Loyola's Financial Aid Office and  through the School of Education.

For additional information on billing, payment, and policies, please visit the Office of the Bursar. For information on financial aid and scholarship opportunities, visit Loyola's Financial Aid Office and Financial Assistance through the School of Education.

 

Elizabeth Vera, PhD

Subjective Well-Being in Urban Adolescents of Color
This project is focused on identifying culturally relevant predictors of subjective well-being in urban youth. Individual predictors (e.g., ethnic identity), interpersonal predictors (e.g., family support), and community predictors (e.g., urban stressors) have been examined as predictors of well-being thus far. This research is school-based and involves the development and implementation of psychoeducational programs in inner city schools to counteract factors which negatively affect urban youth’s subjective well-being.

Understanding Socio-emotional well-being in EL Students
This study examines what factors lead to school persistence and intention to graduate high school in a sample of 9th & 10th grade students in a predominantly Mexican-American, low SES high school located in a Chicago suburb. The research has involved surveying these students on their perceptions of factors including: family and peer influence, school relevancy, neighborhood characteristics, school/family dissonance, parental involvement in school, etc. The ultimate goal of this project is to identify the most potent factors that contribute to school persistence and subsequently design and deliver persistence enhancement programs at this particular high school.

For more information, please contact Dr. Vera at evera@luc.edu.

Eunju Yoon, PhD

I am interested in two lines of research: one, acculturation/enculturation and Asian immigrants’ mental health, and, two, spirituality/religiousness and meaning in life. Specifically, I have done a series of studies to build a theoretical model of acculturation/enculturation and well-being, which I plan to continue.  In relation, I have studied social connectedness to mainstream versus ethnic communities, intersection of culture and gender, and ethnic identity. Spirituality/religiosity and meaning in life is a new line of research that I have recently started and am planning to expand.  I do mostly quantitative research but I also value qualitative research. The privilege of conducting research with motivated and creative students is the most rewarding experience as a faculty member.

Some of most recent projects include: A meta-analysis on the relation of acculturation/enculturation and mental health; Development and validation of Patriarchal Beliefs Scale; Religiousness, spirituality, and eudaimonic and hedonic well-being.

My curriculum vita is available on my faculty page and my e-mail is eyoon@luc.edu.

Rufus R. Gonzales, PhD

Racial Microaggressions in Clinical Supervision
I am currently looking at the experiences of graduate students in the helping professions who have experienced racial microaggressions during clinical supervision. This is a mixed methods study that looks at the relationship between the frequency and severity of racial microaggressions on the supervisory relationships as well as coping strategies of the trainee. I am also exploring how the current political climate has influenced the experience of racial microaggressions during supervision as well as trainee perceptions about what leads to racial microaggressions.​ For more information, please contact Dr. Gonzales at rgonza1@luc.edu.

Hui Xu, PhD

My current primary research program is focused on ambiguity attitudes in career decision-making (CDM) and career decision-making difficulties. I am interested in exploring and expanding two research lines: the role of ambiguity attitudes in CDM and career development, and antecedents of ambiguity attitudes in CDM. My research team has examined associated variables such as career decision self-efficacy, career adaptability, career indecision, calling, and adherence to RIASEC. As much research in the field has been focused on information in CDM, I hope to continue my research on ambiguity attitudes to better understand CDM from the lens of inevitable informational ambiguity in this process. Additionally, I hope to have more multicultural/cross-cultural exploration on the topic of ambiguity attitudes in CDM.

I am also interested in psychotherapy science, including therapeutic relationships, psychotherapy efficacy, etc.  While it is generally difficult to conduct psychotherapy research, I do hope to expand my previous projects on working alliance and cultural congruence when I find necessary resources. It is not new that psychotherapy works, but it remains far from conclusive what exactly contributes to psychotherapy efficacy through which mechanism. I particularly believe we should move beyond working alliance to answer importance questions, such as how to establish working alliance and why therapist-client agreement is important.

In addition to these projects, I can say I am generally interested in the scientific inquiry of counseling psychology. So, I am happy to work with students and collaborators on their research topics based on shared interests. For more information, please contact Dr. Xu at hxu2@luc.edu.

The mission of the Ph.D. program in counseling psychology at Loyola University Chicago is to graduate scientist-practitioner-oriented health service psychologists who identify with the field of counseling psychology and who are committed to promoting social justice in all their professional activities.

 

The philosophical model of the Counseling Psychology Doctoral Program at Loyola University Chicago reflects a commitment to the Scientist-Practitioner tradition.  Hence, the program is committed to teaching our students how to (a) think scientifically about human development, (b) make contributions to the field through research and scholarship, and (c) provide psychological services that adhere to the highest ethical and professional standards and that are empirically-grounded.

 

Within this scientist-practitioner tradition, we emphasize the development of a professional identity in our students that is grounded in health service psychology and in counseling psychology’s core tenets.  As such, our program attempts to produce students who focus on client assets and strengths, and who are committed to fostering optimal development in clients across the lifespan.  While we recognize that the identification and treatment of abnormality is a necessary skill set, students are exposed to theory and intervention approaches that are preventive, developmental, and remedial.

 

Our program also embodies a commitment to social justice and that emphasis runs throughout our training program. Our commitment to social justice emphasizes both the importance of understanding a person’s development within a larger cultural context and an acknowledgement that the interaction between people and their larger contexts is essential to the conceptualization of normal and abnormal development.  Because each individual’s relationship to the socio-cultural context is unique, our program is grounded in a commitment to diversity that is found throughout our coursework, practice, and research opportunities.

 

Finally, we are committed to providing training for our students that is of the highest quality that follows a sequential, comprehensive plan.  Coursework, practicum opportunities, and research experiences are designed to promote a graduated series of learning tasks.  While our students are trained in a generalist model that prepares them to function as health service psychologists in a variety of employment settings, we expect them to gain a firm grounding in counseling psychology and in our areas of specialization—vocational psychology, prevention and psychoeducational interventions, and multicultural and international psychology.

 

We have three overall aims that are a direct reflection of our mission and philosophy:

AIM 1:  To graduate scientist-practitioner-oriented generalists in health service psychology who, as competent scientist-practitioners, display effective communication and interpersonal skills as well as professional behaviors, and apply the knowledge base of the discipline in a scientifically-based, theoretically-driven, ethical, and culturally-responsive manner.  Thus, students are expected by graduation to demonstrate that they have acquired:

  • Discipline-Specific Knowledge in the history and systems of psychology, the psychological sciences, measurement, research methods, and statistics, and
  • Profession-Wide Competencies as health service psychologists, including knowledge and skills in (a) research, (b) ethical and legal standards, (c) individual and cultural diversity, (d) professional values and attitudes, (e) communication and interpersonal skills, (f) assessment, (g) intervention, (h) supervision, (i) consultation and inter-professional/inter-disciplinary knowledge and skills.

AIM 2:  To graduate counseling psychologists who understand the philosophy and history of counseling psychology, can conceptualize clinical practice and research questions from a counseling psychology perspective, demonstrate the ability to engage in independent scholarship on  questions important to counseling psychology, and demonstrate knowledgeable of the literature in the following core areas of counseling psychology:  (a) vocational psychology, (b) prevention and outreach, and (c) multicultural and international psychology.  Thus, students are expected by graduation to demonstrate that they have acquired:

  • Knowledge of (a) the history and philosophy of counseling psychology and current professional issues and trends, (b) theories and research on normal human development, and (c) major theories and research in vocational psychology, prevention and outreach, and multicultural and international psychology.
  • Competencies to (a) conceptualize clinical cases from a counseling psychology perspective, and (b) develop and evaluate interventions to promote positive human development.

AIM 3:  To graduate counseling psychologists who are committed to social justice in all professional roles, who are aware of how injustices affect human functioning, and who demonstrate the ability to design, implement, and evaluate interventions that address social justice issues.  Thus, students are expected by graduation to demonstrate that they have acquired:

  • Knowledge of theories and models of social justice and research that has emanated from these theories and models, and an understanding of how social injustice affects human functioning.
  • Competencies to develop, implement, and evaluate interventions that address issues of social justice.

Britt Duncan, MA (enrolled 2018)

  • Hometown: Atlanta, GA
  • Ethnicity: African-American/Hispanic
  • Clinical Interests: Racial/ethnic minority populations, children and adolescents, psychological well-being, survivors and perpetrators of domestic violence and sexual assault
  • Research Interests: The influence of media on identity development, domestic violence prevention/intervention, resilience in underserved populations, and intersectionality
  • Contact Info: bduncan3@luc.edu

Huaying Li, MS (enrolled 2018)

  • Hometown: China
  • Ethnicity: Asian
  • Clinical Interests: Diversity and microagression counseling; children and adolescence counseling; family-focused counseling
  • Research Interests: Multicultural counseling; children and adolescence development across culture; positive psychology
  • Contact Info: hli10@luc.edu

Juan Pantoja-Patino (enrolled 2018)

  • Hometown: Milwaukee, WI
  • Ethnicity: Latino, Mexican American
  • Clinical Interests: Latinx mental health; multiple minority stress/resiliency; multicultural and social justice counseling; LGMTQI+ affirmative counseling
  • Research Interests: Intersectionality; acculturation and immigrant stress/resiliency; addictive risks among marginalized populations; psychology of race; multisocio dimensions/influences
  • Contact Info: jpantoja@luc.edu

Papa Adams, MS (enrolled 2017)

  • Hometown: Evanston, IL
  • Ethnicity: African-American
  • Clinical Interests: Multicultural and culturally congruent therapies
  • Research Interests: Cross-cultural and international psychology; understanding how cultural context/worldview influences perceptions of illness, wellness and help-seeking; spirituality
  • Contact Info: padams4@luc.edu

Sarah Galvin, MEd (enrolled 2017)

  • Hometown: Glen Ellyn, IL
  • Ethnicity: Caucasian
  • Clinical Interests: Children/adolescents, college students, multicultural therapy
  • Research Interests: Ethnic and racial identity development; ally mindset growth; multicultural education and efficacy
  • Contact Info: sgalvin2@luc.edu

Jeong-Eun Suh, MA (enrolled 2017)

  • Hometown: Busan, Korea
  • Ethnicity: Korean
  • Clinical Interests: Adults, college students, racial/ethnic minority populations, LGBTQ populations
  • Research Interests: Career development of women and racial/ethnic minorities; prevention and intervention programs for underserved populations; spirituality
  • Contact Info: jsuh2@luc.edu

Natasha Chander, MA (enrolled 2016)

  • Hometown: New Jersey
  • Ethnicity: Indian
  • Clinical Interests: Working with underserved populations; at-risk youth; victims of domestic violence
  • Research Interests: Resilience; prevention and intervention programs for at-risk populations; multicultural competence; individuals with developmental disabilities
  • Contact Info: nchander@luc.edu

Daewon (Dave) Kim, MA (enrolled 2016)

  • Hometown: Seoul, Korea
  • Ethnicity: Korean-Canadian
  • Clinical Interests: racial/ethnic minority population, adolescents/young adults, multicultural therapy
  • Research Interests: acculturation/enculturation, ethnic minority & career development, influence of acculturation/enculturation on career development
  • Contact Info: dkim15@luc.edu

Huabing Liu, MSEd (enrolled 2016)

  • Hometown: Shanghai, China
  • Ethnicity: Chinese
  • Clinical Interests: minority populations, college students, career development, psychological well-being
  • Research Interests: adaption process of immigrants and international students, how acculturation and enculturation impact mental health outcomes and coping methods, and career decision and development of international students and immigrants.
  • Contact Info: hliu5@luc.edu

Plamena Daskalova, MEd (enrolled 2015)

  • Hometown: Targovishte, Bulgaria
  • Ethnicity: Bulgarian
  • Clinical Interests: prevention and outreach for immigrants and urban minority youth; developing career interventions and programs to assist adolescents and young adults in a variety of settings; community counseling
  • Research Interests: career development of women, immigrants, and urban minority youth; prevention interventions in urban settings; acculturation and enculturation processes; psychological measurements
  • Contact Info: pdaskalova@luc.edu

Louis Formica, MEd (enrolled 2015)

  • Hometown: Cleveland, OH
  • Ethnicity: White, Italian American
  • Clinical interests: LGBTQ identity development and affirmative counseling, college counseling, clinical supervision
  • Research interests: LGBTQ populations, career development of sexual and gender minorities, intersectionality of social identities
  • Contact info: lformica@luc.edu

Lincoln Hill, MA (enrolled 2015)

  • Hometown: Arlington, TX
  • Ethnicity: African-American
  • Clinical Interests: college students, emerging adults, racial/ethnic minority students
  • Research Interests: college transition experiences for racial and ethnic minority students, multicultural competence, multigenerational trauma in black communities, intersectionality, restorative justice
  • Contact Info: lhill10@luc.edu

Cecile Bhang, MA (enrolled 2014)

  • Hometown: Los Angeles, CA
  • Ethnicity: Korean-American
  • Clinical Interests: children/adolescents, culturally congruent/multicultural therapy
  • Research Interests: resilience promoting factors in ethnic minority children/adolescents
  • Contact Info: cbhang@luc.edu

Latifat Odenewu, MS (enrolled 2014)

  • Hometown: Chicago, IL
  • Ethnicity: Nigerian
  • Clinical Interests: Immigrant and minority populations; children & adolescents
  • Research Interests: Acculturation and enculturation; racial/ethnic identity development of African immigrants; multicultural competence
  • Contact Info: lodenewu@luc.edu

Nickecia Alder, MA, EdM (enrolled 2012)

  • Hometown: Queens, NY
  • Ethnicity: African American, Guyanese heritage
  • Clinical Interests: outreach and preventive interventions with at-risk children and youth from urban settings, couple and family therapy, underrepresented college students
  • Research Interests: racial identity development in African American youth, spiritual well-being as it relates to psychological well-being in African Americans, resilience among urban youth, factors that foster or inhibit academic success in urban youth, family dynamics and structure in relation to identity development,
  • Contact Info: nalder@luc.edu.