Loyola University Chicago

Engaged Learning

University Requirement

Fieldwork

For a course to be designated as “Fieldwork”, satisfying the University Engaged Learning requirement, it must meet all the following criteria. Criteria for field work courses are based on research and best practices in experiential learning:

  1. The field work (clinical placement, practicum) must be approved by the faculty instructor, as it is the extension of the classroom and applying knowledge gained in the classroom.
  2. The academic course in which students engage in the field work clearly states the hours requirement (minimum of 100 hours of work).
  3. The field work experience is with a professional organization related to their field of study, educational goals and/or career and vocational aspirations.
  4. The learning objectives related to the field work experience are clearly articulated related to their field of study, educational goals and/or career and vocational aspirations.
  5. There is supervision and feedback by a professional with expertise related to their field of study, educational goals and/or career and vocational aspirations.
  6. The syllabus assignments include reflection assignments and a final synthesis project integrated into the course.

All courses that have been approved to satisfy the Engaged Learning University Requirement are designated with an "E" appended to their section number, e.g. ANTH 301-01E.  Comprehensive listings of ALL approved Engaged Learning classes offered each semester can be found in LOCUS.


College of Arts and Sciences

ANTH 399: Fieldwork in Anthropology (1-6)
Application of anthropological concepts and methods to a specific field situation under the supervision of a faculty member.  Repeatable.  Outcomes: Students will learn field techniques and data recovery and analysis techniques pertinent to the specific nature of their field experience.  Students must complete 3 credit hours to receive Engaged Learning credit.

CLST 206: Art of Ancient Greece (3)
This course is an introduction to the art of the ancient Greek world from the Bronze Age through the Hellenistic period (to c. 50 B.C.E.), focusing on major trends and developments in Classical Greek architecture, sculpture, pottery and painting through close study of individual examples. Outcome: Students should be able to recognize and interpret selected examples of ancient Greek art, including painting, sculpture, architecture, and other types; they should be able to apply their art-critical and appreciation skills to other types of art

DANC 397: Fieldwork in Chicago-Dance (1-6)
Variable credit (1-6 hours; repeatable) given for performances or projects undertaken with professional dance organizations outside the university. Students keep a journal and write evaluative papers.  Permission of the Department of Fine and Performing Arts Required.  Students must complete 3 credit hours to receive Engaged Learning credit.

ENGR 391: Biomedical Engineering Capstone Design II (3)
This is the second semester of a two-semester Capstone Design series for students specializing in Biomedical Engineering. Each week, you will be introduced to a medical device product development or regulation topic during a 50 minute course meeting. For the remaining 5 hours, your group is expected to work on its Capstone Design project. You will also video-conference with your Industry Liaison and Faculty Advisor weekly.

ENGR 392: Computer Engineering Capstone Design II (3)
This is the second semester of a two-semester Capstone Design series for students specializing in Computer Engineering. Each week, during a 50 minute course meeting, you will be introduced to a computer engineering or professional development related topic. For the remaining 5 hours, your group is expected to work on its Capstone Design project. You will also meet with your Industry Liaison and Faculty Advisor weekly.

ENGR 393: Environmental Engineering Capstone Design II (4)
This is the second semester of a two-semester Capstone Design series for students specializing in Environmental Engineering. Each week, you will be introduced to environmental engineering and professional development topics during a 50 minute course meeting. For the remaining 5 hours, your group is expected to work on its Capstone Design project. You will also video-conference with your Industry Liaison and Faculty Advisor weekly.

MLSC 302: Applied Team Leadership (3)
MLSC 302 applies the fundamentals of Army Leadership, ethics, personal development, and tactics to the team and squad level. Students will receive specific feedback on your leader attributes and core leader competencies as you take on leadership roles in the ROTC program to develop into a capable and dynamic leader.  Outcomes: At the conclusion of this course, students will be capable of planning, coordinating, and leading a squad in a tactical mission during practical instructions in a field environment.

Enrollment Conditions: MLSC 301 is required to enroll in this course. This course is restricted to ROTC students only. MLSC 302 section 001 is taken concurrently with MLSC 302 section 002, the laboratory component.

MUSC 397: Fieldwork in Chicago-Music (1-6)
Variable credit (1-6 hours; repeatable) given for performances or projects undertaken with professional music organizations outside the university. Students keep a journal and write evaluative papers. Permission of the Department of Fine and Performing Arts Required.  Students must complete 3 credit hours to receive Engaged Learning credit.

THTR 397: Fieldwork in Chicago-Theatre (1-6)
Variable credit (1-6 hours; repeatable) given for performances or projects undertaken with professional theatre organizations outside the university. Students keep a journal and write evaluative papers. Permission of the Department of Fine and Performing Arts Required.  Students must complete 3 credit hours to receive Engaged Learning credit.

School of  Business

See  Academic Internships (BSAD 351: Business Internship)

ISSCM 393: Requirements Analysis and Communication (3)
This course focuses on Information Systems requirements and related communication skills.  Students will learn how to gather requirements for Information based on a general understanding of organization and business goals.  Students learn techniques of how to translate between organizational needs and requirements for systems and processes, and how to analyze, validate, and prioritize those requirements.  A special focus of the course will be to improve business communication skills such as interviewing, listening, presenting and negotiating.

ISOM 393: Requirements Analysis and Communication (3)
This course focuses on Information Systems requirements and related communication skills. Students will learn how to gather requirements for Information Systems from an organization¿s users and executives based on a general understanding of organizations and business goals. Students learn techniques of how to translate between organizational needs and requirements for systems and processes, and how to analyze, validate, and prioritize those requirements. A special focus of the course will be to improve business communication skills such as interviewing, listening, presenting and negotiating.

School of Communication

COMM 264: Sports Journalism (3)
This course is designed to give students the fundamentals of sports reporting from game coverage to column writing. Students will cover a beat by doing weekly features, live games stories and advances and learn about issues in sports including race, gender and performance enhancing drug use.

COMM 315: Advanced Reporting Topics (3)
This course offers in-depth attention to the challenges of writing complex stories characterized by careful research, use of sources, interviewing, and reporting and writing. Students examine writing for a "lay" audience in such areas as science and technology, finance, government, and religion.  Students will broaden their writing and research experience.

COMM 345: Student Agency (3)
COMM 345 is a course designed to mimic the structure and operations of a communications agency providing advertising, public relations, branding and digital  services to non-profit organizations and to small companies.

COMM 381 Communication Practicum (3)
Students gain advanced practical experience in service experiential learning projects.

COMM 382 Journalism Practicum (3)
Students gain hands-on practical experience in developing Journalism projects

COMM 383 Radio Practicum (3)
Students will work with WLUW radio station under the supervision of a faculty member participating in one or several of the following activities: generating story ideas, booking guests, interviewing guests, doing promotions using social networking and on-air productions, recording, editing and producing audio segments, learning several facets of what it takes to produce a radio show.

COMM 384 Digital Cinema Practicum (3)
Students will gain advanced practical experience creating digital cinema projects.

School of Education

CIEP M03:  Student Teaching: Infants, Toddlers and Pre-schoolers (6)
This course (along with the related field experiences) serves as a continuation of the Methods courses and meets the requirements of a preprimary student teaching experience.  Outcomes: Teacher candidates will be provided with supervised applied experience in assessment and instruction with children in early childhood special education and will be prepared to work in an early childhood special education setting

CIEP M04:  K-3 Student Teaching (9)
This course is the culminating experience of the K-3 Teacher Education Program. Candidates are placed in a classroom with an experienced cooperating teacher.  Outcomes: In addition to their planning and teaching responsibilities, student teachers also are expected to reflect on their experience, develop their planning and instructional skills, and compile a teaching portfolio.

CIEP MU1:  Student Teaching: Special Education (9)
This course is the culminating experience of the Early Childhood Special Education Teacher Education Program. Candidates are placed in a classroom with an experienced cooperating teacher. Outcomes: In addition to their planning and teaching responsibilities, student teachers also are expected to reflect on their experience, develop their planning and instructional skills, and compile a teaching portfolio.

CIEP MU5:  Student Teaching: Elementary School (9)
This capstone course engages the student in the actual activity of teaching in the elementary school all day, every day, during the semester. Those engaged in student teaching are closely monitored by an experienced cooperating teacher at the school site and supervised by university faculty who have had extensive classroom experience.  Outcomes: Student teaching gives the prospective teacher the opportunity to meld theory with practice in the actual activity of teaching.

CIEP MU6:  Student Teaching: Secondary School (9)
This capstone course engages the student in the actual activity of teaching in the secondary school all day, every day, during the semester. Those engaged in student teaching are closely monitored by an experienced cooperating teacher at the school site and supervised by university faculty who have had extensive classroom experience.  Outcomes: Student teaching gives the prospective teacher the opportunity to meld theory with practice in the actual activity of teaching.

CIEP M60: Secondary Methods: Social Studies (3)
In this course students examine teaching and learning in the social studies in grades 9-12.  Students explore a variety of methods for teaching each discipline within the social studies as distinct subjects and as elements of interdisciplinary courses.  The course emphasizes curriculum planning, practice teaching in the social studies and fieldwork in schools and social studies-related organizations.  Outcomes: Students will design curricula and demonstrate instructional strategies in the social studies that meet the needs of diverse learners and focus on deep engagements with social studies content.

CIEP M64: Secondary Methods: Science (3)
This course is designed to help pre-service teachers develop the theoretical background, practical knowledge, and skills essential for successful science teaching at the high school level.  Outcomes: Students will be able to draw Teaching Science in the Elementary/Middle School connections among instructional planning, implementation, and assessment of student learning through a field experience as well as the practice of instructional skills in peer teaching lessons.

TLSC 380:  Teaching, Learning and Leading with Schools and Communities Internship: Student Teaching (12)
This module (course) represents the candidates' full-time student teaching experience. Candidates will complete three of the edTPA tasks required for certification (edTPA: Designing Instruction Task; edTPA: Assessing Learning Task; and edTPA: The Culminating Teaching Experience Task) in order to document and demonstrate each candidate's ability to effectively teach his/her subject matter. Candidates will also engage in focused reflection on student teaching and their entire teacher preparation program. Candidates will complete the School of Education's Professional Practice Profile (PPP) essay at the end of the module.

School of Nursing

CMAN 272: Mental Health Patterns
This course is designed to prepare students to assist individual, families and communities to achieve and maintain optimal mental health. An epidemiologic model is used to help students understand nursing care of families and individuals experiencing mental disorders across the life cycle in a variety of settings.

CMAN 272L: Mental Health Patterns - Clinical
This clinical course is designed to prepare students in assisting persons (individuals, families, communities) to achieve and maintain optimal mental health. An epidemiologic model will be used to help students guide their nursing care of families and individuals experiencing mental disorders in a variety of settings. In the settings, students use critical thinking (clinical reasoning) to apply knowledge from nursing and other disciplines.

CMAN 380L Community Health Lab (3)
Lab setting for Community Health:  Nursing and public health concepts provide theoretical basis for care of families, aggregates, and communities outside institutional settings. Role of community health nurses in caring for specific aggregates is described. Clinical experiences are provided for application of concepts and implementation of nursing interventions in a variety of community settings.

GNUR  383L  Leadership for Professional Nursing Practice Lab (3)
This course prepares the student to provide leadership in the practice setting and profession. Personal identity and role as nurse leader is addressed from unit-based to organizational and policy environments. Principles of leadership are developed and applied in clinical settings. Legal, regulatory and professional standards related to nursing practice are presented.

MCN 273: Family Health Patterns I
This course applies family theory and an epidemiological framework to present concepts related to the health promotion and maintenance of the perinatal family (childbearing woman, her fetus/neonate, and support persons). Emphasis is placed on the physical, developmental, and psychosocial well-being of the perinatal family.

MCN 273L: Family Health Patterns I - Clinical
This course provides opportunities for students to apply theoretical concepts in the assessment, planning, delivery, and evaluation of culturally competent nursing care delivered to the perinatal family (childbearing woman, her fetus/neonate, and support persons) across risk levels. Family theory and an epidemiological framework are emphasized

MCN 374L - Family Health Pat II: Lab (3)
Lab setting for Family Health Patterns II: Care of the Child and Family:   This course uses the Health People 2010 initiative to structure the presentation of selected concepts related to the health promotion, health maintenance and health restoration of infants, children, adolescents and their families.  Outcome:  Students will be able to use critical thinking to apply knowledge from nursing and other disciplines in the care of infants, children, adolescents and their families.

MSN 277: Medical/Surgical Nursing
Building upon the knowledge gained from the liberal arts, sciences, and nursing science, this course focuses on the nursing care of adults experiencing select acute and chronic health issues and their management. Physical, psychosocial, cultural, spiritual assessments and health data are incorporated into the identification of nursing care problems, establishment of goals, selection of appropriate interventions, and evaluation of care for adults experiencing acute and chronic health issues.

MSN 277L: Medical/Surgical Nursing: Adult Health Nursing - Clinical
This course focuses on implementation of the nursing process in the care of adults experiencing acute and chronic health conditions. Physical, psychosocial, cultural, spiritual assessments and health data are obtained, goals are established and nursing care is planned and evaluated in acute care settings. Evidence-based practice guidelines and interdisciplinary collaboration are used to optimize health outcomes.

MSN 377 - Adult Health II - Advanced Medical-Surgical
This course focuses on the nursing care of adults experiencing complex health problems.  Physical, psychosocial, cultural, spiritual assessments and health data are incorporated into identifying nursing care problems, establishing patient goals, selecting appropriate interventions, and evaluating the care of adults experiencing complex health problems.

MSN 377L: Adult Health II: Advanced Medical Surgical - Clinical
This course focuses on implementation of the nursing process in the care of adults experiencing complex health problems in acute care settings. Physical, psychosocial, cultural, spiritual assessments and health data are incorporated into identifying nursing care problems, establishing patient goals, selecting appropriate interventions, and evaluating the care of adults experiencing complex health problems. Evidence-based practice guidelines and interdisciplinary collaboration are used to optimize health outcomes.

School of Social Work

See internships  (SOWK 330: Social Work Practice I and SOWK 340: Social Work Practice II)