Loyola University Chicago

Engaged Learning

University Requirement

Service-Learning

For a course to be designated as “Service-Learning”, satisfying the University Engaged Learning requirement, it must meet all the following criteria.  Criteria for service-learning courses are based on research and best practices, the CAS Standards for Service-Learning (2009), and the Principles of Good Practice for Service-Learning Pedagogy (Howard, 1993).

  1. The academic course establishes the service expectation of 20+ hours of service to work in the community or in the environment, or on a community-based project connected to the content of the course. 
  2. Learning objectives related to the service experiences are clearly articulated.
  3. There is a clear articulation of the community partnership or project and how it addresses community-defined priorities.
  4. The syllabus assignments and final projects synthesize classroom- and community-based learning.
  5. Activities and assignments encourage students to reflect on larger community issues, sustainability issues, social structures, and/or topics of social justice (e.g. perpetuating dependence vs. building capacity within the community).

The Center for Experiential Learning publishes a listing of ALL approved service-learning classes each semester.  This list can be found on the Service-Learning Program website

All courses that have been approved to satisfy the Engaged Learning University Requirement are designated with an "E" appended to their section number, e.g. ANTH 301-01E.  Comprehensive listings of ALL approved Engaged Learning classes offered each semester can be found in LOCUS.


College of Arts and Sciences

ANTH 104: The Human Ecological Footprint (3)
Only specific sections satisfy the Engaged Learning requirement.  These will include the letter E in the section number. Please see LOCUS for details.

This course is an introduction to global human ecology and concentrates on how humans affect global ecosystems and how these changes can impact our behavior, health, economics, and politics. Why have so many ancient civilizations collapsed?  Is modern industrial civilization in danger of extinction?  Many scientists and concerned citizens believe humans are at the brink of serious ecological crisis.  What is that crisis and how can it be avoided?  We will approach these problems by studying long-term global perspectives of anthropological research on the interrelationship of humans and the natural environment.  Outcome: Students will be able to draw connections between basic ecological processes and the global patterns of human population growth, health and disease, inequality and poverty, subsistence strategies, and land use and technology.

ANTH 301:  Refugee Resettlement (3)
This course concerns investigation of contemporary issues associated with forced migration and refugee resettlement in applied anthropology and humanitarian work. It considers topics of globalization, transnational migration, human rights, and cross-cultural interactions. This course involves service-learning and civic engagement components providing assistance for local refugees and refugee resettlement agencies.

CATH 296:  All Things Ignatian: Living and Learning in the Jesuit Tradition (3)
This course will explore the founder of the Jesuits, St. Ignatius Loyola, and considers his historical context and that of the Jesuits from Renaissance Europe to today. Second, the course will introduce “The Spiritual Exercises”, a highly refined and adaptable method of prayer, contemplation and action. Finally, the course will examine Ignatian spirituality as a practical resource for addressing critical issues in the Church and world today.  Outcomes:  Describe the life and history of Ignatius of Loyola and the Society of Jesus. Identify and explain the chief characteristics and major themes of Ignatian spirituality. Locate, analyze, and demonstrate Jesuit apostolate of scholarship and teaching; identify the global contribution to education, particularly to university life. Experience direct service.

COMP 390: Broadening Participation in Computing, Math and Science (3)
Students will learn about underrepresentation of various population groups in STEM fields (science, technology, engineering, mathematics), as well as some of the reasons and negative effects of this situation.  They will learn about techniques and educational materials for ameliorating this situation and will engage in relevant service learning activities.  Outcomes:  Students gain first-hand experience with broadening STEM participation and seeing how they can make a difference in the lives of other students and contribute to national needs.

ENGL 220:  The Theory and Practice of Tutoring Writing (3)
English 220 develops pedagogical theory, practice, and awareness from which students may tutor writers across the educational spectrum in the Writing Center. Prerequisites: 3.5 GPA, Formal application, Writing sample, UCWR 110, and an English Faculty letter of recommendation describing student's writing and communication skills.

ENGL 393: Teaching English to Adults: Internship (3)
This course offers training and practical experience in tutoring adults in written and spoken English in a volunteer literacy program at Loyola University.   Students examine literacy issues and write a research paper.  Outcome:  Students will demonstrate understanding of societal and cultural factors affecting literacy, and will develop communication and critical thinking skills.

HMSV 201:  Human Services Practice (3)
The purpose of this course is to prepare students for their future work in HMSV agencies and to introduce them to HMSV clients. The course will teach students about the basic issues that face HMSV providers and will help them put a human face on HMSV clients. In addition, the course will emphasize the importance of client diversity in formulating assessment and case management strategies for HMSV clients. 

HMSV 390: Supervised Fieldwork II (6)

INTS 278:  International Service Learning (3)
This course is a seminar course focusing on community-based service in an international setting. The focus of the course will be on cultural and political practices from a community perspective through service-learning, in which students will work 50-75 hours over the academic period at international non-profit organizations.  Outcome:  Students will gain professional experience in an international setting, engaging in direct service with a different culture and community, while reflecting on their service experiences in the context of cultural and political community development, the impact of the current environment on specific populations, contemporary issues, social justice and poverty, and global citizenship.

MATH 147: Math for Teachers I (3)
This course provides the foundation for teaching standards based mathematics in the elementary school classroom. In this first course, students study geometry, measurement, data analysis and probability and fulfill the civic engagement value of core by tutoring in the Chicago Public Schools. Outcome:  Students will broaden their understanding of elementary school mathematics instruction and tutor elementary-aged students.

PHIL 262: Social and Political Philosophy – Civic Engagement (3)
This course will investigate one of the central questions of philosophy and social theory: how we, as human beings, should live together. Because it includes a service learning experience it satisfies the civic engagement core requirement.  Outcomes: Students will be able to demonstrate understanding of the major philosophical questions in the area of social philosophy with attention to the historical and conceptual development of these questions, and be able to articulate some of the major problems and responses central to this area of philosophy.

PHIL 264: Health Care Ethics – Civic Engagement (3)
This course studies philosophical ethics as practiced in the health care setting. It includes a service learning experience and satisfies the civic engagement core requirement.  Outcome: Students will be able to demonstrate understanding of traditional moral theories in a health care framework, as well as the varieties of ethical challenges facing contemporary health care.

PHIL 284: Health Care Ethics (3)
Only specific sections satisfy the Engaged Learning requirement.  These will include the letter E in the section number. Please see LOCUS for details.

This course focuses on using philosophical tools (concepts, values, theories, forms of argumentation, and so on) to illuminate, analyze, and evaluate the practice and domain of health care.  The course aims to enable students to become better moral reasoners; that is, to improve their ability to recognize, think through, assess, and articulate their moral views as well as to understand, contribute to, and critique the views of others.  Outcome: Students will be able to demonstrate understanding of traditional moral theories in a health care framework, as well as the varieties of ethical challenges facing contemporary health care.

PHIL 287: Environmental Ethics (3)
Only specific sections satisfy the Engaged Learning requirement.  These will include the letter E in the section number. Please see LOCUS for details.

This course introduces students to ethical reasoning and to various topics in environmental ethics. Topics may include: pollution, animal rights, and natural resources. 

PHIL 325:  Ethics and Case-Based Reasoning (3)
This course is an engaged learning course that provides students with a unique opportunity to practice applying moral theories and argumentative principles to personal and social- ethical problems, and to teach middle school students how to do the same. The course focuses on presenting solutions to cases and hence involves research, writing, and oral presentation.  Outcomes:  Students will be able to understand and articulate a deeper awareness of philosophical problems and answers to questions using a case based system.

PLSC 335: Urban Semester Seminar (3)
Students explore how cities work through texts, field trips, and guest speakers, and help find solutions to pressing urban issues. They fulfill civic engagement core value requirement.  Outcome: Students will understand and address inequities in urban communities, and identify avenues of leadership and civic engagement in contemporary cities.

POST 395:  Polish Studies Capstone (3)
Capstone course to the POST Minor program. This is a tutorial course with a service learning component that serves an integrative purpose. In the tutorial students will focus on a specific issue or theme in POST. The syllabus will reflect the research interests of the faculty member who administers the course.  Outcomes: Students will be able to integrate their coursework in the POST minor with their major concentration.

PSYC 349: Maturity and Aging (3)
Only specific sections satisfy the Engaged Learning requirement. These will include the letter E in the section number.  Please see LOCUS for details.

Overview of theory and research relevant to middle age and aging. Topics include personality, cognitive and social functioning as well as biological functioning. Applications to life situations, such as living arrangements, provision of health services, and retirement, are discussed. Outcomes: Students will demonstrate understanding of major theories, research methodologies, and empirical knowledge in the study of maturity and aging, and learn to recognize and reject myths and stereotypes associated with adult development and aging.  

PSYC 390:  Internship in Psychology (3)
Capstone service-learning experience for senior psychology majors, involving application and development of psychological knowledge and skills through an internship (100 hours) in a human service organization or applied research setting, combined with academic classroom activities.  Outcomes: Students gain knowledge and skills in:  function and operation of human service agencies or applied research settings; values and ethics in work settings;  written communication; theories and practices of helping and/or applied research;  interacting effectively with diverse clients, peers and supervisors; and drawing connections between theory and practice.

PSYC 392:  Internship in Applied Psychology (3)
Capstone service-learning experience for senior psychology majors, involving application and development of psychological knowledge and skills through an internship (100 hours) in an applied research setting, combined with academic classroom activities.  Students prepare a portfolio integrating their field work with the psychology major.  Outcomes: Students gain knowledge and skills in:  values and ethics in work settings; interacting effectively with diverse clients, peers and supervisors; drawing connections between theory, research, and practice.

RUSS 290:  Russia and Russians in the World (3)
Russian 290 is a service learning course focusing on leadership through service learning and the study of the Russian language and history.  Outcomes: 1) Students will develop Russian language skills (speaking, listening, reading, writing) and expand their knowledge of Russian history and culture. 2) Student will develop civic engagement leadership skills through practical service work and reflection.

SOCL 101: Sociology (3)
Only specific sections satisfy the Engaged Learning requirement.  These will include the letter E in the section number. Please see LOCUS for details.

This is a foundational course in the social sciences which explores the effect of globalization on everyday life in the United States and elsewhere, using the basic perspectives and methodologies of sociology.  

SOCL 127:  Social Analysis; Social Action (3)
This course helps students who participate in the domestic "Alternative Break Immersion" or other service trips to better understand the communities and issues they will encounter. It emphasizes the analysis of "social solutions" to social problems as well as personal reflection and action.  Outcome: Analyzing and acting on social issues.

SOCL 216: Sociology of Violence (3)
Only specific sections satisfy the Engaged Learning requirement.  These will include the letter E in the section number. Please see LOCUS for details.

This course is designed for students who are interested in understanding the prevalence and causes of violence and the social issues associated with violence.  During the course we will utilize the discipline of sociology to consider and analyze various forms and types of violence occurring in the United States and worldwide.  We will examine the characteristics, causes, and consequences of violence; in doing so we will consider a range of perspectives including cultural factors associated with violence and structural factors found in the economy and other social institutions.  Outcome: Students learn to examine the causes of violence from a sociological perspective. They also learn methods to reduce violence and the harm it causes.  

SOCL 264: Contemporary Vietnam; Class, Family, & Gender (3) (Vietnam Center only)
Only specific sections satisfy the Engaged Learning requirement. These will include the letter E in the section number. Please see LOCUS for details.

This course furnishes its students with a critical examination of contemporary Vietnamese culture from a combination of sociological and cultural studies perspectives. Concentrating on the political dynamics of contemporary culture, students will understand changes and reinventions in modern Vietnamese culture and figure out the roles of various agencies in shaping and reshaping "national culture" within global contexts.  Outcomes: Students will be able to identify and analyze a number of key issues in the development of modern Vietnam, including national identity, family, social classes, and gender. Moreover, through the exploration of archaeology, literature, performing arts, and gastronomy, students will be able to employ various approaches from different disciplines to scrutinize how the Vietnamese have received, assimilated and localized foreign factors to enrich their cultural life. Finally, students will be able to develop different ways of understanding the diversity and drivers of Vietnamese culture. At the end of the course, students will be able to examine how contemporary Vietnamese culture and history have been perceived, shaped and presented through mainstream media and official discourses. 

SOCL 280: Special Topics - Confronting Homelessness (3)
Only specific sections satisfy the Engaged Learning requirement.  These will include the letter E in the section number. Please see LOCUS for details.

Who are homeless people in the United States and beyond?  Why are they homeless?  What is being done to address the issues of homelessness?  This course addresses these questions from a variety of disciplinary perspectives. Students will also learn by assisting at various agencies. The course is shaped around student-facilitated discussions, interaction with resource personnel from the community, and participation in a service-learning opportunity at an agency that provides either direct or indirect services for and with homeless people that calls for 3 to 4 hours of work a week for 10 weeks of the semester. That community work is to be integrated into the discussions as well as into writing assignments.  

SOCL 335:  Urban Semester Seminar (3)
Students explore how cities work through texts, field trips, and guest speakers, and help find solutions to pressing urban issues. They fulfill civic engagement core value requirement.  Outcome: Students will understand and address inequities in urban communities, and identify avenues of leadership and civic engagement in contemporary cities.

THEO 100: Introduction to Christian Theology (3)
Only specific sections satisfy the Engaged Learning requirement.  These will include the letter E in the section number. Please see LOCUS for details.

This course is an introduction to reflection on and analysis of the Christian theological tradition.  Outcome: Students will be able to demonstrate understanding of the tasks of Christian theology in its efforts to understand the human situation from the perspective of faith, various challenges to theology in the contemporary world, and will focus on one or more current theological issues.  

THEO 348:  Supervised Ministry (3)
Placement in a ministerial position, on-site supervision, and biweekly individual or group meetings with the course director is required.  Outcome: Students will be able to demonstrate how a sacramental system of aesthetics is often embedded in cultural artifacts.

THTR 348:  Creative Dramatics (3)
This course explores the process of engaging children with theatre games and techniques as a means towards self-expression, personal development and content learning.  Laboratory experiences working with children are provided.  Outcome: Students will articulate the differences and similarities between theatre for children and creative dramatics disciplines, develop age appropriate materials and exercises, identify appropriate facilitating methods and techniques and apply these techniques in a laboratory setting.

UCSF 137: The Scientific Basis of Environmental Issues (3)
This course will introduce students to the scientific framework and how it is applied to a variety of environmental issues.  The objective of this course is threefold:  firstly, students will learn the language scientists use to discuss the environment; secondly, students will gain the skills to unpack new ideas in a scientific way and thirdly students will learn how the issues you are learning in class directly impact community.  This course will give students an opportunity to discuss one of the most prominent scientific issues that they will face, as well as the chance to create their own opinion rooted in scientific evidence.

URB 397: Urban Research (3)
In Urban Studies Research, undergraduates work on collaborative, community-based research projects through CURL (Center for Urban Research and Learning). The research teams include graduate students, faculty, and community leaders. Outcome: Students will contribute to a research project that addresses inequities in urban communities.

WSGS 201: Contemporary Issues in WSGS: Global and Local Feminisms (3) 

Only specific sections satisfy the Engaged Learning requirement.  These will include the letter E in the section number. Please see LOCUS for details.

This course will focus on the lives of women transnationally – comparing experiences of women across cultures, in our local community and in other parts of the world – with the goal of building understanding and solidarity.  It will engage directly with the history and experiences of women in Latin America and Chicago, as well as with women from various parts of the world through the Loom program. 

WSGS 399:  WSGS Capstone (3)
This is a project-oriented course that represents the culmination of the WSGS major. Students will build on their previous work in WSGS 391/Methodologies in WSGS to plan and complete a project under the direction of a faculty or community organization mentor. The project may be conducted individually or as a group but must (1) demonstrate an interdisciplinary approach; (2) draw on theory and scholarship in women's studies and gender studies; and (3) reflect the intentional use of feminist methodologies in practice.

Center for Experiential Learning/Office of the Provost

EXPL 290:  Seminar in Community-Based Service and Leadership (3)
This course is a seminar course focusing on community-based service and leadership through service-learning, in which students will work 40 hours over the semester at a non-profit organization.  Outcome: Students will gain professional experience at an organization, while reflecting on their service experience in the context of asset-based community development, civic engagement, social justice, leadership in the community, and service for the common good.

EXPL 291:  Seminar in Community-Based Research and Leadership (3)
This course is a seminar course focusing on community-based research and leadership through service-learning. As a service-learning course, students will work a minimum of 40 hours over the semester through direct service AND community-based research projects at a non-profit, community-based organization, approved by the Center for Experiential Learning.  Outcome: Students will reflect on their service and community-based research experience in the context of asset mapping, organizational action research, civic engagement, social justice, leadership in the community, and research as service for the common good.

EXPL 292:  International Service-Learning (3)
Seminar course focusing on community-based service in an international setting. Focus will be on cultural and political practices from a community perspective through service-learning, in which students will work 50-75 hours over the academic period at international non-profit organizations.  Outcome:  Students will gain professional experience in an international setting, engaging in direct service with a different culture and community, while reflecting on their service experiences in the context of cultural and political community development, the impact of the current environment on specific populations, contemporary issues, social justice and poverty, and global citizenship.

UNIV 190:  Service and Social Justice (3)
Students contribute 25 hours of service in a community or campus project, and reflect on those experiences in relation to social justice and the particular topic of their course section.  Outcome: Students will contribute to and understand service in relation to social justice in a topical area.

Institute of Environmental Sustainability

ENVS 267: Bird Conservation and Ecology (3)
Only specific sections satisfy the Engaged Learning requirement.  These will include the letter E in the section number. Please see LOCUS for details.

This course is intended to provide students with an applied introduction to the theory and practice of avian conservation and ecology.  Students will become skilled in critical reasoning and some bird monitoring techniques, and demonstrate an understanding of the many facets of bird conservation.  Outcome: Students will become skilled in critical reasoning and some bird monitoring techniques, and demonstrate an understanding of the many facets of bird conservation.  

ENVS 273:  Energy and the Environment (3)
Only specific sections satisfy the Engaged Learning requirement. These will include the letter E in the section number. Please see LOCUS for details.

The concept of energy developed from antiquity through the present day and applied to national and worldwide energy use patterns, the technologies supporting their use, as well as the societal impact and environmental consequences of energy usage.  Outcome: Students will become skilled in critical reasoning and methods of inquiry; demonstrate an understanding of critical concepts and knowledge and current and future technologies and their impact.  Includes participation in a community project that focuses on energy education.  

ENVS 283:  Environmental Sustainability (3)
Only specific sections satisfy the Engaged Learning requirement. These will include the letter E in the section number.  Please see LOCUS for details.

Examines the impact of humans as consumers on the environment and how these interactions affect the probability of establishing sustainability for human and non-humans on Earth.  Outcome: Students will become skilled in critical reasoning and methods of inquiry, and demonstrate an understanding of knowledge critical to the field including current human consumptive practices and their effects on the health and well-being of living organisms.   Includes participation in a community project that focuses on sustainable practices.  

ENVS 340: Natural History of Belize (3)
Only specific sections satisfy the Engaged Learning requirement. These will include the letter E in the section number. Please see LOCUS for details.

This is a unique Study Abroad immersion field course designed to build on the foundations learned in Ecology, Environmental Science/Studies, and Anthropology classes by examining first hand and in more depth the biodiversity and tropical ecosystems of Belize, by exploring the country’s rich cultural traditions of some of its peoples, particularly the Mayans; and learning how local communities are involved in protecting and sustaining ecological and natural sites through community based conservation and sustainability practices.  

ENVS 345: Conservation and Sustainability of Nontropical Ecosystems (3)
Only specific sections satisfy the Engaged Learning requirement. These will include the letter E in the section number.  Please see LOCUS for details.

This course provides an introduction to conservation ecology in Neotropical ecosystems via classroom sessions and experiential learning activities during a Spring-Break field trip to Belize.   Students will gain experience in environmental monitoring and biological survey methods.  Ecosystems studied: coral reefs, mangrove forests, subtropical rain and dry forests, savannas, rivers, wetlands.  Outcomes: Students will gain an understanding of tropical climates, neotropical terrestrial/aquatic ecosystems and applied conservation and environmental practices such as nature reserve design and management, community-based resource management, ecotourism, and ecoagriculture.  

ENVS 350A:  STEP: Topics Water (4)
'STEP: Water' is an interdisciplinary and hands-on course in which students learn about a relevant and complex environmental problems pertaining to water and then develop and implement projects that address the problem on campus and in the local community.  Outcomes:  Students will develop understanding of water-related environmental problems, demonstrate skills/knowledge needed to address those problems, and develop skills to recognize/articulate future possibilities for environmental leadership and civic engagement.

ENVS 350C: STEP: Climate Action (4)
'STEP: Climate Action' reviews the environmental, political, economic, historical, and cultural contexts of climate change, arguably society’s most critical challenge. It examines actions occurring at varying geographic scales to mitigate and/or adapt to climate change impacts. The course assumes students’ familiarity with foundational climate science. In addition to analyzing the strengths and limitations of various climate actions from an interdisciplinary perspective, you will participate in a hands‐on, team‐based project in which you and your peers design and implement locally a solution to address climate change. Because of its foci on community engagement and leadership in sustainability, this course satisfies Loyola’s Engaged Learning core requirement.

ENVS 350F: STEP: Topics Food Systems (4)
'STEP: Food Systems' is an interdisciplinary and hands-on course in which students learn about a relevant and complex environmental problems pertaining to food production, processing and transport and then develop and implement projects that address the problem on campus and in the local community.  Outcomes:  Students will develop understanding of environmental problems related to food systems, demonstrate skills/knowledge needed to address those problems, and develop skills to recognize/articulate future possibilities for environmental leadership and civic engagement.

ENVS 363: Sustainable Business Management (3)
Only specific sections satisfy the Engaged Learning requirement. These will include the letter E in the section number.  Please see LOCUS for details.

This course will introduce students to the emerging field of sustainability in business and the growing focus on the social, environmental, and economic performance of businesses.  The course presents the scientific, moral, and business cases for adopting sustainability.  

ENVS 369: Field Ornithology (3)
Only specific sections satisfy the Engaged Learning requirement. These will include the letter E in the section number.  Please see LOCUS for details.

This course offers students the opportunity to engage directly with a concrete science based research project that is directly of service to the Bird Conservation Network and engages them to reflect on service and justice issues around environmental issues. Outcome: Students will become skilled in critical reasoning, field techniques, and scientific investigation that demonstrate an understanding of knowledge and techniques used in field ornithology.  

ENVS 383: Human Dimensions of Conservation (3)
Only specific sections satisfy the Engaged Learning requirement.  These will include the letter E in the section number. Please see LOCUS for details.

This course focuses on the human dimensions of biodiversity conservation.  It will examine theories and research from the fields of anthropology, sociology, political science, psychology, and economics that apply to conservation.  Examples of topics that might be covered include: values, beliefs, attitudes, and behaviors; common pool resources; political, psychological, sociological, economic, and cultural factors influencing conservation; Indigenous and local knowledge; stakeholder engagement, collaboration, and community-based conservation; and basic methods of human dimensions inquiry. 

ENVS 390: Integrative Seminar (3)
Only specific sections satisfy the Engaged Learning requirement.  These will include the letter E in the section number. Please see LOCUS for details.

This seminar course is intended to serve as a ‘capstone’ for Environmental Science and Studies majors. As such, it is designed to reflect the interdisciplinary nature of environmental issues, induce students to draw from knowledge and experience gleaned over the course of their degree program, and stimulate discussion on, and appreciation of, the complex nature of environmental issues, and the multi-faceted array of considerations required to effectively address them.  Students will engage in a solutions-oriented project that addresses a problem statement and that requires integration and application of environmental studies, environmental science, and environmental policy knowledge gained during the undergraduate program. 

Interdisciplinary Honors Program

HONR 290: Literacy Center (3)
This course offers training and practical experience in tutoring adults in written and spoken English at the Loyola Community Literacy Center.  Students tutor adult learners, some of whom are native English speakers preparing for the GED or improving their literacy skills.  Others are immigrants or refugees who may know some English or no English.  Students must attend an orientation as well as bi-weekly class meetings and tutor one or two evenings a week.  Students are required to keep and submit a weekly journal of their experiences, examine a textbook and journal articles concerned with literacy and adult education, write four papers throughout the semester, and prepare a final paper or project.

HONR 291: Literacy Center II (3)
Second semester of HONR 290 (See description above)

HONR 370: Fieldwork in Honors – Internship  (1-3) 
The main goal of this course is to provide students with valuable work experience in a professional field connected with their academic program. It allows students to apply and further develop their knowledge and skills through an internship in a non-academic setting. The course is also intended to serve as a "bridge" between college and career. This internship presents an opportunity for students to gain valuable professional experience as an intern in public or private institutions engaged in public service projects. HONR 370 will satisfy the "service" requirement for all Honors students. Students must complete 3 credit hours to receive Engaged Learning credit.

School of Business

ISSCM 241: Business Statistics (3)
Only specific sections satisfy the Engaged Learning requirement.  These will include the letter E in the section number. Please see LOCUS for details.

This course examines the steps and procedures required to solve problems in science, social science, and business where data are useful - from the definition of the managerial problems to the use of statistical analysis to address these problems. Outcome: Students will be able to demonstrate understanding of statistical thinking and data analysis technique for decision-making purposes.  

ISSCM 357:  Project Leadership - Engaged Learning (3)
The main topics of this course are fundamentals of project leadership, communication with various stakeholders (e.g., external as well internal to the project team), fostering team work, and basics of planning, including setting/ tracking project objectives.
Outcomes:  Students describe the difference between project management and functional management and the role of the project manager.  Students also develop a plan and schedule project(s).

ENTR 311:  Social Entrepreneurship (Not for Profit Ventures) (3)
This course introduces the student to the financial similarities of the traditional, not-for-profit organization; however, it also provides students with new insights and tools to effectively measure the social benefit and return on capital spent by applying entrepreneurial business principles. Outcomes:  Students demonstrate:  an understanding of the term “social entrepreneurship” - what it includes and what makes it different;  the use of analytical tools to quantify social issues with potential for a sustainable positive outcome; an understanding of non-for-profit market characteristics.

MARK 311: Marketing Research (3)
Only specific sections satisfy the Engaged Learning requirement.  These will include the letter E in the section number. Please see LOCUS for details.

This course develops an understanding of the research process from problem formulation through research report preparation. Both qualitative and quantitative research methodologies are discussed. The focus is on using research results in marketing decision making. Empirical data are analyzed using state of the art analytical tools.  

MARK 373: Integrated Marketing Communications (3)
This course develops an understanding of how advertising, personal selling, public relations, sale promotions, and direct marketing are coordinated to produce a unified, integrated marketing communications campaign. Message development, placement, timing, and evaluation metrics are examined within the context of marketing strategy.  Outcomes: Students will: Identify the role of IMC as it relates to other marketing functions, develop the theoretical and analytical skills necessary for the initiation, execution, and evaluation of IMC strategies, develop, write and present an IMC plan, and present and defend IMC recommendations and critically examine the recommendations of others.

MGMT 335:  Micro-enterprise Consulting (3)In the Jesuit tradition of using knowledge to serve humanity, students utilize and improve their business knowledge and skills by meeting the real-life business consulting needs of individual entrepreneurial and not-for-profit clients starting up or operating businesses in economically distressed communities.  Outcomes:  Students improve skills in service-oriented communication, project management, teamwork, and cross-functional business analysis; and learn how locally-owned business can foster community economic development.  Consulting clients receive a feasibility analysis or business plan to help guide business operations and obtain financing for a new or struggling business.

School of Communication

COMM 204: Community as Story (3)
This course uses children's literature as means of understanding urban community and individual identities within that community. Students will, through community service, interaction with local experts and ethnographic research, explore communities surrounding Loyola's campus and create children's picture books in collaboration with experienced student artists.

COMM 215: Ethics and Communication (3)
Only specific sections satisfy the Engaged Learning requirement.  These will include the letter E in the section number. Please see LOCUS for details.

This course explores various approaches to ethical decision-making and applies that process to diverse aspects of every day, contemporary life.  Outcome: Students learn to discern a wide variety of ethical issues concerning communication behavior, apply systematic ethical analysis to various communication situations, and clearly explain their analyses.  

COMM 281: Communication, Language and Gender (3)
This course explores the role of communication practices in the production, reinforcement and transformation of gendered identities. Students will learn how gender expectations within cultural contexts are created. They will also learn some of the ways that deeply-rooted assumptions limit social change and guide communication.

COMM 311: Health Communication (3)
Only specific sections satisfy the Engaged Learning requirement.  These will include the letter E in the section number. Please see LOCUS for details.

This course focuses on the growing field of health communication. Building on students’ knowledge of communication – including public relations, advertising, journalism and marketing – this class aims to help students develop an area of specialization that offers career opportunities in many settings. Through readings, case studies, guest speakers and field trips, the class is designed to provide an overview of what health communicators do and where they work. The class will also provide a broad introduction to physician-patient communication, mass communication, health journalism, corporate communication, communication by non-profit health organizations and government health agencies, and public health education campaigns. In addition, the course will examine a variety of theories used in health communication and explore such national health issues as health disparities, health literacy, patient safety and healthcare reform.  

COMM 320: Public Service Communication (3)
This course examines public relations strategies and applications in cause-related campaigns, public service initiatives, and community relations activities for corporate and nonprofit organizations.  Students will be able to analyze current issues and advocacy campaigns, define ethical communication and social responsibility, and develop a public service campaign for an organization.

COMM 337: Advertising and Public Relations Multimedia Commercial Production (3)
This is an advanced video and advertising course designed to give students an introduction to various types of multimedia commercials as well as practical considerations of producing television spots.  Outcomes:  Students will need to multi-task to complete several commercial projects and practice the process of developing and executing broadcast production, as well as learn more about technology and implications of media production, and strategy and creative development, through studying, reading and engaging with the community.

COMM 372: Youth Journalism & The Education Gap (3)

Only specific sections satisfy the Engaged Learning requirement.  These will include the letter E in the section number. Please see LOCUS for details.

This course serves two purposes; theoretical framework and praxis.  In pursuit of the former, students will develop an understanding of what it means to be a high school student from an under resourced community in the city of Chicago, the challenges they face in pursuit of academic success from both personal and systemic perspectives.  This section of the course will explore the interconnection between youth/digital journalism, constructivist educational philosophy and cultural relevance in education.  In pursuit of the latter, we will help to implement a Digital Journalism curriculum which seeks to embower said students to be storytellers and journalists for their communities through mentorship, take ont eh various responsibilities associated with publishing their works in an online journal, and analyze the result in aggregate.

 

School of Continuing and Professional Studies

CPST 390: Organizational Theory and Practice (3)
Only specific sections satisfy the Engaged Learning requirement.  These will include the letter E in the section number. Please see LOCUS for details.

This course extends knowledge of organizations by examining organizational behavior at the macro-level.  Students will gain a deeper understanding of organizational theory and research including historical and modern era approaches.  Students will also analyze organizational behavior and settings including an in-depth case study of a single company.  Outcome:  Students produce a capstone project through a service learning opportunity applying theories and concepts from this and previous CPST courses. 

CPST 397: The Capstone (3) (Effective Fall 2015)
Students will research a problem, conceptulize solutions and develop a solution as their capstone project. In the class, students will synthesize and apply knowledge from prior courses. Course topics will vary as students will design their own projects that address an issue or problem in a community of professional setting.  Outcome: Students will write a proposal, conduct research, complete the project and present their findings orally and in a formal essay. Students will present their e-portfolio as a graduation requirement.   Enrollment Conditions: Restricted to students in the School of Continuing and Professional Studies.  This is the final course in the major and may only be taken after completion of all other requirements.

HEM 100:  EMT – Basic (4)
This course is designed to instruct a student to the level of Emergency Medical Technician-Basic, who serves as a vital link in the health care team. This includes all skills necessary to provide emergency medical care and a basic life support (BLS) level with an ambulance or other specialized service. Student must maintain active CPR recognition throughout the course.

School of Education

CIEP 104:  Math for Teachers I (3)
This course provides the foundation for teaching standards based mathematics in the elementary school classroom. In this first course, students study geometry, measurement, data analysis and probability and fulfill the civic engagement value of core by tutoring in the Chicago Public Schools. Outcome:  Students will broaden their understanding of elementary school mathematics instruction and tutor elementary-aged students.

CIEP M61: Secondary Methods: English (3)
This course provides an intensive examination of the methods utilized in the teaching of language arts in grades 9-12.  The course allows opportunities for students to synthesize their philosophy, content knowledge, and practice, in preparation for student teaching.  Outcome:  Students will be able to implement methods of teaching language, composition, and literature, in grades nine through twelve. In addition, students will be able to design and implement meaningful literacy experiences and curricula.

CIEP M62: Secondary Methods: Mathematics (3)
This course is designed to provide students with the knowledge and methods necessary for success in teaching in today's secondary mathematics classroom.  Outcome:  Students will be able to implement methods of teaching mathematics and methods of assessment in grades sixth through twelve.

CIEP 390: Academic Coaching in the Community (3)
Only specific sections satisfy the Engaged Learning requirement.  These will include the letter E in the section number. Please see LOCUS for details.

The goal of this course is two-fold. The primary focus is the academic support of at-risk high school freshmen and a secondary benefit is the transformative experience afforded to the Academic Coaches. Working weekly on-site in urban high schools exposes Academic Coaches to communities and cultures that reach well beyond the boundaries of Loyola’s classrooms and campuses. The Coaches experience a growing awareness of their own abilities and how these talents can be harnessed to help others. The consistent interaction with students and administrators in urban school settings yields a deep sense of commitment as well as a clearer understanding of educational inequities. The coaches’ immersion in a service environment over a sustained amount of time, conceivably lays the foundation for a future life path that is guided by social responsibility. 

ELPS 125: Introduction to Leadership Studies (3)
This course is designed to provide an introduction to the concept of leadership, including an exploration of contemporary leadership knowledge and skills that may be utilized in a variety of disciplinary contexts and settings. The course will flow through: 1) an exploration of self, 2) understanding self in the context of others, and 3) recognition of broader social systems and ways of influencing them. As an Engaged Learning course, two learning experiences are central to this class: service and critical reflection. 

TLSC 110/120/130: Sequence:  Introduction to Teaching, Learning and Leading with Schools and Communities (Total 4 ch)

TLSC 110, 120 and 130 must be taken together.

TLSC 110: This module (course) introduces teacher candidates (students) to the profession and our program (TLLSC) with a focus on collaborative relationships within and among schools, families, and communities. This module (course) will expose teacher candidates (students) to specific knowledge and skill indicators necessary for educators to embody the dispositions of the profession.  Outcomes: Teacher candidates (students) will reflect on the knowledge, skills, and dispositions of educators with regard to teaching diverse students, the mission of Professionalism in Service of Social Justice, and the connection between research and practice related to collaborative relationships.

TLSC 120: In this module, students will observe and learn key principles and stages developmental and learning theories via clinical experiences in birth to grade 12 settings (including infant/toddler, preschool, elementary, middle, and high schools).  The primary focus of these experiences is to explore the ways in which physical characteristics, communication skills, cognitive capacities, and social-emotional needs of children be used to understand theory and inform adult-child interaction and developmentally appropriate pedagogical practices in birth to grade 12 settings with both typically and atypically developing children.  Outcomes:  Through guided observation, students will explore the ways in which social, cultural, and environmental contexts shape the development and cognitive processing at each age, and use this knowledge to inform recommendations for developmentally appropriate adult-child interaction and pedagogical practices with every age range from birth through grade 12.

TLSC 130: This module (course) is designed to engage teacher candidates (students) in an authentic exploration of the inherent relationship between public schools and the surrounding community. Teacher candidates (students) are introduced to the concepts of cultural and social capital as they work in small groups to explore a thematic component of these communities.
Outcomes:  Teacher candidates (students) will complete a Community Map Project, which includes a map of community elements, concept map depicting the relationship between elements and resources, narrative analysis of findings, and personal reflection.

School of Nursing

CMAN 375: Community Health Nursing (3)
This course integrates nursing and public health concepts to provide a theoretical base for the care of families, aggregates, communities, and populations. The levels of prevention model and Healthy People 2020 are used as an organizing framework to address care across the lifespan.  Outcomes:  Describe community health nursing; Explain roles of government & voluntary agencies, community health nurses & consumer groups in primary, secondary & tertiary prevention; Describe process for health teaching, contracting & case management; Discuss community assessment relationship to community health planning.

CMAN 375 L: Community Health Nursing (3)
This lab course provides the student with an opportunity to apply nursing and public health concepts to the community.  A community assessment is conducted to identify needs within a selected community.  Outcomes:  1. Conduct a community assessment. 2. Describe the roles of federal, state, and local public health agencies in community assessment and health planning. 3. Explain the community assessment process and its relationship to community health planning.  4. Use epidemiology to identify health risks for a population.

CMAN 380: Community Health (2-3)
Nursing and public health concepts provide theoretical basis for care of families, aggregates, and communities outside institutional settings. Role of community health nurses in caring for specific aggregates is described. Clinical experiences are provided for application of concepts and implementation of nursing interventions in a variety of community settings.  Students must complete 3 credit hours to receive Engaged Learning credit.

EXCM 101: Introduction to Exercise Physiology (4)
Introduction to the major; also includes a lab component covering Emergency Procedures and Safety Skills, introduction to common safety principles, predisposing factors and common causes of accidents, injuries and illnesses.

HSM 110: Healthcare in America (3)
The course is comprised of two credit hours of classroom/didactic content and one credit hour of service. This course provides an introduction to the healthcare system, orienting the student to its overall structure, functions, and processes. The variety of roles and functions within the different segments of the health care industry are identified to assist the students in considering his/her potential area of specialization and ultimate career path. The description and possible roles within various health systems positions are defined including the roles and functions of administrators, including boards of directors in health agencies, systems and organizations.  Service credit is achieved through volunteering at a selected health care agency.

HSM 210: Introduction to Global Health (3)
This course will provide students with the opportunity to compare and contrast contemporary problems in health services policy and delivery in developed and developing nations.  Students will analyze national performance from a financial, management, government, private sector and public policy perspective. Students will obtain a more complete understanding of the problems and possible solutions to U.S. health system inefficiencies and inequities by seeking an international perspective. Inefficiencies and inequities of other nations will be identified and ideas that have worked to increase access and quality of health services will be described.

HSM 220:  Aging in America (3)
The impact of the aging population on the healthcare system and the unique health needs of this population will be examined.  Emphasis will be placed on options for long term care and the treatment of chronic illness.  The diversity of the aging population and the myths and stereotypes of aging will be explored.  Discussions will address psychosocial and physical issues, financial resources, legal and ethical issues as well as social justice concerns related to care of the elderly, public policy and services, and the potential vulnerability of the aged.  Students complete 25+ hours of direct community service to elder adults at elder serving organizations around Chicago.

HSM 338: Healthcare Marketing (3)
This course introduces the principles of marketing in healthcare organizations. It focuses on the fundamentals of marketing and issues, needs, challenges and constraints not found in consumer and/or business-to-business marketing. It includes: the opportunity to analyze situations and apply traditional and contemporary marketing concepts and skills to develop market analyses and plans appropriate for healthcare providers within 21st century healthcare organizations, experience how consumers view healthcare products and services: including Internet marketing, new media, customer relationship marketing, transparent pricing and quality as a comparative market advantage, and discusses the benefits and challenges of using social marketing to affect consumer lifestyle behavior. It provides knowledge of the application of market research requirements and its new analytics.  The class will be comprised of lecture, case discussions, guest speakers, student/team assignments and a team-service learning project with a healthcare organization or affiliation.

School of Social Work

SOWK 200:  Introduction to Social Work (3)
Introduction to social work through the identification of human problems in society and the role of both society and social services in response to those problems. Students work at social service agencies and become familiar with social work values and ethics.  Students will be able to evaluate current ways in which agencies interpret social problems and administer services.

SOWK 361: Women (Policy, Institutions, & Media) in a Global Context (3)
Only specific sections satisfy the Engaged Learning requirement.  These will include the letter E in the section number. Please see LOCUS for details.

This course will cover curriculum tailored to understanding women and their institutions and their representation in media in a Global Context.  The course will be structured in a seminar format and a hybrid modality. It aims to complement and supplement the knowledge bases of relevance to students of social work, women’s studies, international studies, migration, and communication.