Loyola University Chicago

January Term

Course Descriptions

College of Arts & Sciences

Listed below are the course descriptions for College of Arts and Sciences, Quinlan School of Business, School of Communication, and School of Social Work.

ANTH 100 Globalization and Local Cultures
This course is a study of cultural diversity on a global scale, and provides a comparative perspective on the investigation of humans as cultural and social beings. Students will be able to demonstrate understanding of the historic and contemporary relationships between cultures and societies, and to understand how cultures change over time.

ANTH 101 Human Origins
Requirement: UCSF 137 for students admitted to Loyola University for fall 2012 or later.  No requirement for students admitted to Loyola prior to Fall 2012 or those with a declared major or minor in the Department of Anthropology, Department of Biology, Department of Chemistry, Department of Environmental Science, Department of Physics, Bioinformatics, Forensic Science or Neuroscience.

This course explores the study of the biological history of the human species from its inception to the establishments of food producing societies. Students will demonstrate understanding of basic biological principles (heredity, physiology, evolutionary mechanisms, ecology) in the context of their application to the human condition, as well as the role of cultural behavior in defining the distinctiveness of that condition.

BIOL 111 General Biology Lab I
Co-requisite: BIOL 101
This course complements the lecture material through observation, experimentation, and when appropriate, dissection of representative organisms. Observations will include physical and chemical phenomena as well as the anatomy and physiology of selected organisms. The organisms to be studied will be selected from the kingdoms monera, protista, fungi, plantae, and animalia.

BIOL 210 Laboratory Techniques
Prerequisite: BIOL 102 and 112
Lab sessions designed to prove a firm foundation in basic techniques and procedures, use of equipment and apparatus; keeping a lab notebook and in data collection and treatment.

BIOL 265  Ecology
Prerequisites: BIOL 102, 112; CHEM 102 or 106.  Restricted to Biology and Environmental Science/Studies students.
This course will cover the relationships of organisms to their environment and to each other at the organism, population, community, and ecosystem levels.

BIOL 282 Genetics
Prerequisites:  BIOL 102, 112; CHEM 102 or 106. Pre-requisites For Bioinformatics majors ONLY: BIOL 101; CHEM 102 or 106
This course surveys principles and processes of genetic inheritance, gene expression, molecular biology, developmental, quantitative, population and evolutionary genetics. Students will develop knowledge and awareness of the genetic bases of modern biology. They will understand Mendelian principles of inheritance, chromosome and DNA structure and replication, gene expression, molecular biology, genetic bases of development and other biological processes, and quantitative, population and evolutionary genetics. This course is a blended section.

BIOL 365 Writing a Scientific Manuscript
Prerequisite: BIOL 102,112
This course is designed for upper level students interested in practicing the scientific process; including hypothesis construction, experimental design, data collection, and writing of a scientific paper detailing introduction, methods, results and discussion. Students would learn to develop hypotheses, design experiments based on those hypotheses, analyze data, and learn to construct and peer-review a scientific manuscript.

BIOL 380 Genetics and Evolution of Development
Developmental genetics and evolutionary developmental genetics (evo-devo) are two fast growing areas of biology.  The discovery that many genes identified in nematode, insect, plant, bacterial and small vertebrate systems are conserved through evolution in the human genome has re-invigorated this area of study.  Many genes involved in human health, cancer, craniofacial disease and heart disease are ancient and shared across organisms.  Students will leave this course with an appreciation of the unique role that “model organisms” play in helping us understand human growth and development, while also gaining an understanding of the fundamental conservation of gene function that has occurred during evolution.  We will also see how evolution can inform our understanding of human diseases like Marfan’s syndrome, ovarian cancer and hand/foot deformities.  There is a strong element of “Evolutionary Medicine” in this course beneficial to all pre-medical students.  As one of a small number of courses at Loyola focusing on model systems biology, this course provides students with an outlook on a way of doing biology which recently resulted in the 1995 (Drosophila like genes pattern vertebrate brain) and 2002 (nematode like cell death and development genes implicated in human carcinogenesis) Nobel prizes.  In addition, this course will help students develop discipline specific writing skills in the context of Self Organized Learning Experiences while also allowing them to develop skills in presenting scientific material in the form of group discussions of writing developed from their SOLE projects.

CHEM 226 Organic Chemistry B Lab
Co- or prerequisite: CHEM 224, Prerequisite: CHEM 225.
A laboratory course for non-chemistry majors designed to reinforce lecture topics from CHEM 224 and to expose students to organic synthesis.  Students will perform reactions to prepare known organic compounds and then isolate and characterize the reaction products.

COMP 150 Introduction to Computing
Restricted to Freshman or Sophomore standing OR majors other than COMP-BS AND CSEC-BS AND SWEN-BS.

The world overflows with electronic data. This course introduces programming in a simple, powerful language like Python, with selection, repetition, functions, graphical effects, and dynamic interaction with the Internet, plus connections to lower level computer organization and computer implications in the wider world. Students will be able to manage and transform masses of data, and understand the technical, societal, and ethical issues involved.

DANC 260 Improvisational Technologies and Methodologies
This course is designed to develop students’ understanding of improvisational tools used in professional dance practices. As a topics course, students will learn an overview of improvisational technologies and methodologies that address the current standards used in professional dance auditions and choreographic processes. Coursework includes applied skills and technique, lectures, reading, research, as well as guest teachers and practitioners in the field. This course is designed to adequately prepare students for a career in dance performance, choreography, and pedagogy.

ENGL 283 Women in Literature
Requirement: UCLR 100 for students admitted to Loyola University for Fall 2012 or later.  No requirement for students admitted to Loyola prior to Fall 2012 or those with a declared major or minor in the Department of English, Department of Classical Studies, or Department of Modern Languages and Literatures.

In this class, we will examine creative non-fiction written by women. Specifically, we will look at texts that explore experiences of being mothers, daughters, and partners. How does being a mother or daughter or partner change one’s outlook on life? Cross-listed with Women's Studies, English 283 is designed to meet the "literary knowledge and experience" requirements of the Loyola Core. Focusing on literature written by 20th and 21st century women authors, this course is designed to help students gain knowledge of women's lives and writings; to train students in the analysis of literature; and to teach students how to describe, analyze, and formulate arguments about literary texts.

  • Synchronous sessions: 9:30-11:30 a.m. Monday-Saturday.

ENGL 290 Human Values in Literature                              
Adopting an international and cross-disciplinary perspective, this section of ENGL 290 will examine the portrayal of human values in modern and contemporary works by selected non-western writers from Africa, the West Indies, South Asia, and USA. Our main aim will be to examine the extent to which the societies under study (and the individuals who constitute them) share universal values and the extent to which these societies and their values are predicated upon culture specific norms and expectations. To this end, we will consider the role of nationalism, tradition, religion, race, ethnicity, gender, and class/caste in the conception and practice of such values. In addition, we will analyze the cultural bases of contributing literary techniques, including structure, language, narrative focus, and characterization among others, to arrive at comparative assessments of the portrayal of human values in modern world literature.

Schedule:

  • This course will be taught entirely online. There will be no synchronous classes. Instead, daily recorded lectures will be available via Sakai and Zoom (Loyola’s video and web conferencing service), which students can access at a time of their own choosing.
  • All course readings and assignments are to be completed by the end of the 2-week J-Term period on January 11, 2020.
  • The instructor will be available for individual appointments via Zoom.
  • You will need access to a computer and a strong internet connection, but a headset and webcam are not necessary.

Assignments: Graded assignments will include a midterm, a final exam, and a brief paper. For questions about the course, please contact Dr. Mann at hmann@luc.edu.

FNAR 199 Art and Visual Culture
An introduction to the principles of art and their application to broader visual culture, this course explores the complex nature of art through an examination of its visual elements, techniques, functions, critical methodologies, and related social issues. The course takes advantage of Chicago's artistic resources. Students will demonstrate knowledge of the elements of visual language; means of visual expression in diverse cultures and eras; media and techniques of art; artistic terminology; and critical approaches to the study of visual culture and related social issues. Students will acquire the skills to interpret art and visual culture in oral and written form.

HIST 102 Evolution of Western Ideas and Institutions Since the 17 Century
This course traces the development and of western civilization and its global impact from the seventeenth century to the present. Students will gain an understanding of history as a discipline, develop critical thinking skills based on historical knowledge about the key people, places, and events that shaped the modern world, and hone their communication skills.

HIST 104 Global History since 1500
This course deals with the emergence of the modern world, including such topics as the expansion and intensification of cross-cultural interaction; imperialism, colonialism, and nationalism; the spread of information; capitalism, industrialism, and popular sovereignty; race and ethnicity, gender, and socio-economic status. Students will be able to evaluate and explain the forces of historical continuity and change; demonstrate how the encounters/changes between and among societies produced the world we have today; analyze and discuss the significance of primary and secondary sources and how they relate to the history under discussion.

HIST 209 Survey of Islamic History
Requirement: HIST 101, HIST 102, HIST 103, or HIST 104 for students admitted to Loyola University for Fall 2012 or later. No requirement for students with a declared major or minor in History.

The course will introduce the historical development of Islamic civilization and the formation of Muslim social and political institutions from the 7th century to the present. Students will be able to demonstrate knowledge of the historical development and diversity of Islamic beliefs, practices, and institutions in varied regional contexts and historical periods.

HIST 212 United States Since 1865
Requirement: HIST 101, HIST 102, HIST 103, or HIST 104 for students admitted to Loyola University for fall 2012 or later. No requirement for students with a declared major or minor in History.

This course is an introduction to the history of the United States from the Civil War to the present. Students will demonstrate an understanding of how the United States became a modern industrial society, the emergence and evolution of the modern welfare state, the rise of the United States as a global power, and the impact of controversies over civil rights and liberties on American society.

ITAL 101 Italian I
This J-term course ITAL 101 section is designed for students who have studied Italian in the past, but want  or need a refresher course before enrolling in ITAL 102. Beginning Italian students should not enroll in this course.

ITAL 102 Italian II
Prerequisite:  ITAL 101
This course continues the introduction to the basic grammatical elements of Italian, promoting the further development of listening comprehension, speaking, reading and writing skills while examining the geography and culture of Italy. Students will be able to understand and write basic Italian sentences and to produce orally and in writing short sentences providing basic personal information about themselves, their activities and plans in Italian.

LITR 280 World Masterpieces in Translation: Polish Short Stories
Requirement: UCLR 100 for students admitted to Loyola University for Fall 2012 or later.  No requirement for students admitted to Loyola prior to Fall 2012 or those with a declared major or minor in the Department of English, Department of Classical Studies, or Department of Modern Languages and Literature.

In this course we will examine selected Polish short stories in English translation. The readings selected span several periods within Polish literary history, including Romanticism, Positivism, Modernism, World War II Literature, the Communist period, and contemporary Polish literature. We will also explore a range of literary genres and techniques: realism, symbolism, and surrealism; witness literature, fictionalized reportage, and autobiography; the avant-garde, expressionist, psychological prose, and fables.

LITR 280 World Masterpieces in Translation: The Literature and Culture of Israel
Please visit the Study Abroad website for information.

 

LITR 280 World Masterpieces in Translation: The Literature of Italy
Please visit the Study Abroad website for information.

LITR 284 International Film: Latin American Women Filmmakers
This course offers a panorama of films directed, and often, written by Latin American women. While historically underrepresented in the region’s cinema, Latin American women directors have risen to regional and international prominence since the early 2000s to a degree not experienced by their peers in the US and Canada. This semester we will explore the cultural production of a selection of female directors from across the region (and including the work of US Latinas); in so doing, we will attempt to understand not only their contribution to regional and world cinema, but the specific filmic and narrative strategies through which they represent and problematize the local and the national.

  • Synchronous sessions: 6-7:30 pm CST on January 2, January 6, January 8 and January 10.

MUSC 101 Art of Listening
Focus is on the acquisition and enhancement of listening skills through direct experience of musical works along with an examination of cross-cultural similarities and differences among musical styles. Concert attendance is required. A cultivation of musical perception through a process of repeated and guided listenings; strengthening of listening skills while developing and expanding styles perspectives. Review the course syllabus for MUSC 101.

MUSC 102 Class Piano for Beginners
For the student who has never had keyboard instruction and is interested in learning the art of performance on the piano. Fundamentals of music theory, note reading and personal enjoyment are emphasized. Strongly recommended for those preparing to teach music in elementary school.  Students will learn a basic keyboard ability with an emphasis on reading music symbols accurately while also enjoying the making and doing of music.

PHIL 130 Philosophy and Persons
The course examines the way philosophy looks for fundamental characteristics that identify life as a properly human life, asks about its ultimate meaning or purpose, and raises questions about what counts as a good life. Students will be able to demonstrate understanding of the various approaches of the philosophical question of what it means to be human.

PHIL 181 Ethics
This course examines ethical norms for conduct (e.g., theories of right and wrong action, of justice and of human rights) and ethical norms for judging the goodness or badness of persons and their lives. Special attention will be given to criteria for choosing between conflicting ethical theories, moral disagreement, the justification of moral judgments, and the application of ethical standards to practical decision-making and ethical questions that arise in everyday life. At the end of the course students are able to demonstrate understanding of criteria for choosing between conflicting ethical theories, moral disagreement, the justification of moral judgments, and the application of ethical standards to practical decision-making and ethical questions that arise in everyday life.

PHIL 288 Culture and Civilization
Requirement: PHIL 130 for students admitted to Loyola University for Fall 2012 or later.  No requirement for students admitted to Loyola prior to Fall 2012 or those with a declared major or minor in the Department of Philosophy or Department of Political Science.

This course examines the nature, causes, and possible future development of human culture and civilization. Students will be able to demonstrate understanding of the various approaches to the philosophical study of human culture and civilization.

PLSC 101 American Politics
Requirement: ANTH 100, PLSC 102, PSYC 100 or SOCL 101 for students admitted to Loyola University for Fall 2012 or later.  No requirement for students admitted to Loyola prior to Fall 2012 or those with a declared major or minor in the Department of Anthropology, Department of Criminal Justice, Department of Economics, Department of Psychology, Department of  Political Science, the Department of  Sociology, Human Services or the School of Nursing.

American national government and politics, including institutions, group and electoral processes, and public policy. Students will be able to demonstrate an understanding of the American political system, the patterns of political participation and behavior of diverse individuals and groups in American society, and evaluate the roles and processes of U.S. political institutions.

PLSC 102 – International Relations in an Age of Globalization
(Satisfies Core Societal and Cultural Knowledge: Foundational Course)

This course is designed to introduce students to the major concepts and approaches in the study of international relations. In the first part, we will cover the basic theories used in the study of the field. In the second part, we will focus on specific issues that are of interest to the study of international relations such as military conflict, the global economy, the environment, international law, and human rights. The course is an option in the “Societal and Cultural Knowledge” section of the core curriculum as well as a required course in the Political Science and Global and International Studies majors.

  • The course is taught entirely online.
  • Five optional synchronous lecture sessions are scheduled from 7:00-8:30 p.m. on Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays.
  • To participate in this course, you will need access to a computer and internet.
  • Headset and webcam are useful but not necessary.
  • Course requirements include a midterm, forum posts, a brief essay, and a final exam.

PLSC 300D Contemporary Political Issues in International Relations: Northern Ireland
Please visit the Study Abroad website for information.

PSYC 238 Gender and Sex Differences and Similarities
Requirement: ANTH 100, PLSC 102, PSYC 100 or SOCL 101 for students admitted to Loyola University for fall 2012 or later.  No requirement for students admitted to Loyola prior to Fall 2012 or those with a declared major or minor in the Department of Anthropology, Department of Criminal Justice, Department of Economics, Department of Psychology, Department of Political Science, the Department of Sociology, Human Services or the School of Nursing.

This course is an overview of psychological research and theory concerning differences and similarities between genders. Students will understand similarities and differences between genders, comprehend the diversity of ideas about gender and how ideas of gender are determined by societies and cultures.

PSYC 275 Social Psychology
Analysis of human thoughts, feelings and actions as influenced by other people. Topics include socialization, perception of self and others, prosocial and antisocial behavior, attitudes, interpersonal attraction, social influence and group behavior. Group B.

PSYC 368 Counseling I
Prerequisites: PSYC 101; PSYC 331 or 338 is also recommended.
Introduction to the principles, theories, ethics, and techniques of major helping interventions including the clinical interview and use of the case history, individual and group approaches. Students will demonstrate the ability to critically evaluate different approaches to intervention in terms of their theoretical underpinnings, application to diverse problems, goals and populations, general effectiveness, and overall strengths and limitations.

SOCL 101 Society in a Global Age
This is a foundational course in the social sciences which explores the effect of globalization on everyday life in the United States and elsewhere, using the basic perspectives and methodologies of sociology.

SPAN 101 Spanish I
Prerequisite: Minimum of one semester of high school Spanish, or a one semester university level Spanish course. This course is intended for students who have had limited previous experience with Spanish, and need a refresher course before continuing onto SPAN 102.  Instructor permission is required.    

This is an intensive online immersion course created for students who need to review and develop their first semester language skills in reading, writing, speaking, and listening, as well as in cultural awareness. 

By the end of the course you should be able to:

  • Interpret cultural cues regarding greetings.
  • Discuss basic interests related to your studies and university life.
  • Talk about family life and leisure activities such as sports.
  • Indicate conditions related to the present tense.  
  • Analyze cultural readings regarding life in Latin America/Spain.
  • Present information, concepts, and ideas to an audience.

In order to achieve these course objectives, we will be using authentic materials such as songs, videos, poems, and online games carefully selected to enhance your linguistic skills.   

Students signing up for this course agree to attend the 5 synchronous sessions (please see below and on syllabus).  We will also have daily asynchronous sessions where you will be responsible for using the online textbook and its accompanying language software.  Because this is an online course where all of the materials and resources are also found online, students will be required to have access to a computer with reliable internet access.

  • Mandatory Online Orientation: TBA
  • Required synchronous session dates: Mondays, Fridays, and Saturdays, 3:30PM - 4:30PM

SPAN 102 Spanish II
Prerequisite: SPAN 101
This course builds on SPAN 101, and introduces students to new topics and grammatical structures. Students will be able to produce sounds in Spanish more accurately, express appropriate reactions to ordinary situations, understand basic oral commands, read more complex texts, and write sentences in cohesive paragraphs.

THEO 100 Christian Theology
This course is an introduction to reflection on and analysis of the Christian theological tradition. Students will be able to demonstrate understanding of the tasks of Christian theology in its efforts to understand the human situation from the perspective of faith, various challenges to theology in the contemporary world, and will focus on one or more current theological issues.

THEO 107 Introduction to Religious Studies
This course is an introduction to the contemporary field of religious studies, focusing on both the theoretical investigations of religious traditions, as well as on the study of selected religious texts and practices (such as creation stories, sacred biographies, sacred scriptures of a religious tradition(s) rituals, ritual taboos, religiously motivated behaviors). Students will be able to analyze and interpret various ways in which religious traditions intersect with contemporary issues.

THEO 186 Global Religious Ethics
Religious Ethics explores fundamental moral sources and methods in Christian ethics in dialogue with the ethical understandings of at least one other religious tradition, and with special attention to Roman Catholic thought. In doing so, it explores moral issues faced by individuals and communities from theological perspectives, particularly mindful of how the economic, political and cultural structures in a religiously plural world affect those issues. In this course, students will explore and compare the ethical understandings of Christianity and at least one other religious tradition.  With respect to each tradition, students will learn about the foundational sources, doctrines and questions that guide its ethical thinking.

THEO 190 Loyola's Mission: Ignatian Traditions
The course introduces students to LUC's mission through theological reflection on the main themes of the Transformative Education mission-statement: spirituality and faith, interlinked human knowing, moral compass, civic and environmental responsibility. Students will be able to integrate into the LUC community, ethos, and vision.

THEO 267 Jesus Christ
Requirement: THEO 100 or THEO 107 for students admitted to Loyola University for Fall 2012 or later. No requirement for students admitted to Loyola prior to Fall 2012.

This course examines the life of Jesus Christ, utilizing the Gospels, the writings of Paul and other biblical authors, the early ecumenical councils, and the history of church doctrine, including contemporary scholarship.

THEO 282  Introduction to Hinduism
Requirement: THEO 100 or THEO 107 for students admitted to Loyola University for Fall 2012 or later.  No requirement for students admitted to Loyola prior to Fall 2012.

This online course offers a historical introduction to Hindu traditions.  We will cover topics like yoga and meditation, Hindu ethics, stories of the gods and goddesses, ritual practices, and so forth. 

The synchronous meeting times are from 10 AM to noon CST on each of the designated J term days.  Students MUST be free to be in class during these hours as these class meetings are required.  The course will involve daily readings, viewing of videos and prerecorded lectures before synchronous meetings, assignments, and exams.  All course activities and assignments will be completed by the midnight on January 12th. Students should have a reliable, WIRED internet connection as well as video and audio capabilities on their computer. Please contact the instructor with any questions.

There will be a MANDATORY online orientation session for this class on Wednesday, December 11th at NOON Central Standard Time. 

THEO 297 Buddhism
This online course aims to introduce major doctrines, practices, and historical developments of Buddhism. Acknowledging this highly diverse tradition, any course claiming to offer an introduction to "Buddhism" might be also seen as an introduction to "Buddhisms." Roughly equal time will be devoted to major developments of Buddhism, normally referred to as Theravāda, Mahāyāna, and Vajrayāna, looking at the past and  present. This course will take an interdisciplinary approach to the tradition by using resources from anthropology, sociology, history, political science, theology and philosophy. We will discuss Buddhist ideas such as, but not limited to cosmology, personhood, the environment, gender, race, and ethnicity.

THTR 100 Introduction to Theatre Experience
This course is an introductory study of the theatrical art form and its contemporary production practice.  Students engage in a series of workshops and participatory creative projects. Students will demonstrate the ability to identify the variety of collaborating arts and artists that combine to create of a work of theatre; to analyze a play script for live performance; to evaluate theatrical production; and to creatively apply knowledge of theatrical process through expressive and creative endeavors.

School of Communication

COMM 101: Public Speaking and Critical Thinking
This introductory course is designed to supply students with the skills of public address, a fundamental understanding of critical thinking practices, foundational tenets of communication theory, a grasp of the relationship between context and communication, and a sense of the social responsibility that comes with the capacity for communication

COMM 103 Business & Professional Speaking
This course emphasizes communication in organizational settings, and examines the theory and practice of catering oral presentations for specific audiences.

COMM 175 Introduction to Communication
This course gives a general historical and theoretical overview of communication. By looking at communication through a critical, historical and theoretical lens, students will acquire an intellectual framework for further study and practice in communication. Students will increase communication literacy.

COMM 200 Communication and New Media
Prerequisites: CMUN/COMM 150, 160, or 175.
This course explores the ways technology affects personal, cultural, and mass communication through examining the historical, societal, and ethical implications of newer and interactive forms of media. Students use audio, video, and digital tools to research and produce essays, projects, and presentations that analyze the impact of technology on communication.

COMM 215 Ethics and Communication
Prerequisites: CMUN/COMM 150, 160, or 175.
This course explores various approaches to ethical decision-making and applies that process to diverse aspects of every day, contemporary life. Students learn to discern a wide variety of ethical issues concerning communication behavior, apply systematic ethical analysis to various communication situations, and explain their analyses clearly.

COMM 296:  Themes in Advertising and Public Relations
Prerequisite: COMM 175
Intermediate-level Advertising/Public Relations lecture course that examines specific areas of study. Topics vary each semester. This course may be repeated (with different topics) for a total of 9 hours, but only 6 may count toward the major. Students will gain access to a wide variety of topics in AD/PR.

The Institute of Environmental Sustainability

ENVS 301/MPBH 401 Environmental Health
Restricted to Juniors and Seniors within IES  
This course is designed as an introduction to environmental public health issues, laws, regulations, research, and advocacy. Environmental factors including biological, physical and chemical factors that affect the health of a community will be presented. The environmental media (air, water and land) and various community exposure concerns will also be presented. The course will utilize available internet resources to access environmental data, and focus -related research. A team project will be completed requiring literature review and presentation and critical assessment of a successful (or unsuccessful) environmental advocacy campaign.

ENVS 340/BIOL 395  The Natural History of Belize
Prerequisite: IES Majors/Minors: ENVS 137; Biology Majors/Minors: BIOL 102 & 112; Anthropology or International Studies Majors/Minors: Junior or Senior Standing

This Study Abroad field course is designed to build on the foundations learned in Ecology, Environmental Science, and Anthropology classes by examining the biodiversity and tropical ecosystems of Belize, by exploring the cultural traditions of some of its peoples, particularly the Mayans; and learn how local communities are involved in protecting and sustaining ecological and natural sites through community based conservation and sustainability practices. Please review the course information on the Study Abroad website.

ENVS 364/464 Sustainability Management in a Global Context, Costa Rica
Please visit the Study Abroad website for information.

Quinlan School of Business

BSAD 220  Career Preparation
Career Preparation introduces students to the critical skills required for successful career development and job search navigation. Students will learn about career development; develop job/internship search skills; establish a job/internship search action plan; and begin to become oriented to employer research. Topics addressed will include resume/job search correspondence; interviewing skills; network building; career & employer research and career development resource building. This online course will be asynchronous.

ECON 201 Principles of Microeconomics
Requirement: ANTH 100, PLSC 102, PSYC 100 or SOCL 101 for students admitted to Loyola University for Fall 2012 or later.  No requirement for students admitted to Loyola prior to Fall 2012 or those with a declared major or minor in the Department of Anthropology, Department of Criminal Justice, Department of Economics, Department of Psychology, Department of  Political Science, the Department of  Sociology, Human Services or the School of Nursing.

This course is an introduction to demand and supply, consumer choice, price analysis in alternative industrial organizations, and the distribution of income. Students will be able to think critically about price formation in different market structures, and how prices, household incomes and income distribution in a diverse society are determined with interpretations based on the concepts of opportunity costs and decision making under uncertainty.

INFS 346  Database & Data Warehousing Systems
Prerequisites:  Sophomore Standing, minimum grade of "C-" in INFS/ISOM 247.  
Covers current concepts in database theory and use.  The course teaches design, implementation, and utilization of relational database management systems by covering the processes, tools, and methodologies such as business requirement collection, ER modeling, relational modeling, normalization, SQL, and MS Access. Students will be able to demonstrate understanding of how to effectively develop and use business database system.

Class Notes: Synchronous Class Meeting Times will run 10:00 AM to 1:00 PM, Central Standard Time.  Your attendance and participation is expected during every class meeting.  These meetings will include your participation in discussions, quizzes, and exams.  In addition to class session participation, quizzes and exams, this course also requires completion of HW assignments that will be posted on Sakai.

A brief online meeting will be held in mid-to-late December to review the course guidelines. We will discuss J-term expectations, required textbooks, homework and more.  Knowing the design and expectations for the course puts you in position to be successful.  Please watch your LOYOLA e-mail account for the meeting date and time. If you use a different e-mail account, then set your Loyola account to forward all e-mails.

General experience with the J-term course points to success for organized and ambitious students who are eager learners and have serious attitude towards their studies.  The on-line course runs very similar to a traditional in-class course. The class meets on-line (as specified above) but students still engage and ask questions, just like a traditional class.

MARK 201 Principles of Marketing
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing.
This course develops an understanding of the marketing systems by which organizations plan, price, promote and distribute products and services to selected target markets.

Outcome:  Students analyze market conditions and apply the basic tools to develop marketing strategies to successfully meet the customers' needs resulting in a viable, profitable organization.

Class Notes: Please note this online course has both synchronous and asynchronous components. Students are expected to be online from 2:00-4:00pm (Central Standard Time) each day during the J-Term. There will also be daily asynchronous activities. If you would like to see a syllabus for the J-Term Mark 201 course, please contact Dr. Mary Ann McGrath at Mmcgrat@luc.edu .

MARK 310 Consumer Behavior
Prerequisites: Junior standing, minimum grade of "C-" in MARK 201.
This course develops an understanding of how consumers behave before, during, and after the consumption process through a discussion of cultural, social, and perceptual factors. Students evaluate consumer behavior and apply their understanding in the creation of a marketing plan designed to improve the brand equity of a firm.

OPMG 332 Operations Management
Prerequisites: Sophomore standing and minimum grade "C-" ISSCM 241
Introduction to concepts and methods for managing production and service operations.  Topics include demand forecasting, aggregate and capacity planning, inventory management, facility layout and location, just-in-time, managing quality, project planning, resource allocation, and logistics. 


Outcome: Understanding of basic issues and role of operations management in organizations, and of tools for problem-solving in operations management.

The School of Continuing and Professional Studies

CPST 247: Computer Concepts and Applications
An introduction to computer and internet resources and skills with an emphasis on effective use of technology in the work place. Students will learn to identify and provide recommendations for technology-based issues in business using industry standard language, identify changes in information technologies and assess the impact on business and society.

Outcomes: Understand the purpose and composition of information systems in business, and receive hands on experience developing business applications with tools such as Microsoft Office, social media, basic website construction.

Restricted to students in the School of Continuing and Professional Studies.

School of Social Work

SOWK 201 Social Welfare Policies & Services I
Requirement: ANTH 100, PLSC 102, PSYC 100, or SOCL 101 for students admitted to Loyola University for Fall 2012 or later. No requirement for students admitted to Loyola prior to Fall 2012 or those with a declared major or minor in the Department of Anthropology, Department of Criminal Justice, Department of Economics, Department of Psychology, Department of Political Science, the Department of Sociology, Human Services, or the School of Nursing.
Prerequisite: sophomore standing.

Analysis of institutional structures of welfare as they relate to social problems. Selected major values and interests in American society are used to analyze the social welfare institution. Students will be able to describe and analyze current social welfare policies and social services within a historical, societal, and political context.

  • Social Work 201 Social Welfare Policies & Services I is an on-line, writing intensive course for J Term 2014. 
  • Please check back for synchronous times. Course will meet on-line through Adobe Connect. The two-week course will involve daily readings, exams, and daily assignments. All course activities and assignments will be completed by the end of the two week period. Students should have internet capacity as well as voice and audio capabilities on the computer they will use.
  • Students should have comfort with the Sakai on-line environment by accessing on-line Sakai tutorials provided through University technology prior to the start of the course. Enrollment in the course should be the student's main activity during the two-week period.
  • A meeting will be held in December to review guidelines for the class, required textbooks and readings to be completed prior to the first day of class. Details of the meeting will be sent in late November/early December. Please contact the instructor with any questions.

SOWK 602 Health Policy and Health Systems
Prerequisites: SOWK 507 and SOWK 509
Health-care systems are examined in the context of social policy and healthcare needs. The effects of different levels of healthcare interventions, changing roles and responsibilities of government, the voluntary sector and the proprietary sector are assessed in relation to access and utilization of health care.

EXPL 290 Community-Based Responses to Social Injustice: Deconstructing Post-Katrina Recovery Efforts in New Orleans
The city of New Orleans was forever changed by the devastation caused by Hurricane Katrina in the summer of 2005. Nearly fifteen years later, recovery efforts are still underway. More specifically, the social safety net that provides medical and social services to the city’s most vulnerable residents continue to be reimagined and reconstructed in the midst of deeply-rooted government corruption and a national political climate that devalues the lives of the poor and people of color. Through an immersive learning experience that involves seven days in New Orleans proper, this course will specifically explore the impact that Hurricane Katrina had on the HIV prevention and treatment service delivery systems in this historic city. Additionally, the role of race, class, and sexual/gender identity in the recovery of these systems will also be explored. Students will be challenged to collectively construct a social justice approach to the recovery of New Orleans’ HIV prevention and treatment services delivery systems. Please note that faculty and students will meet in Chicago at the start of J-Term (January 2nd and/or January 3rd) prior to leaving for New Orleans on January 5th.

SOWK 713 Nonprofit Management
This course will examine the history, growth and evolution of the nonprofit sector and explore critical management, leadership and institutional development issues. Nonprofits organizations provide not only basic human needs, but also a means to enhance and expand the public discourse on social issues throughout the United States.