Loyola University Chicago

Midwest Modern Language Association

Opportunities and Announcements

The MMLA regularly posts updates and announcements that might be of interest to our membership: Conference CFPs, grant and fellowship openings, publication opportunities and anything that engages with the scholarly interests of our members. Check this page regularly for new updates. 

Job Opportunity! 

The University of Texas Permian Basin seeks a generalist in English Composition and Literature Survey courses. In addition, preference may be given to candidates who have a demonstrated ability to teach either Drama or Spanish – or both. The appointment will begin in Fall 2020. Positions are one-year appointments with opportunity for renewal. See the official job posting for more details.  

 

There are just a few weeks left to apply for the Newberry's Long-Term Fellowship Program! 

 

The Newberry Library's long-standing fellowship program provides outstanding scholars with the time, space, and community required to pursue innovative and ground-breaking scholarship. In addition to the library's collections, fellows are supported by a collegial interdisciplinary community of researchers, curators, and librarians. An array of scholarly and public programs also contributes to an engaging intellectual environment.

We invite interested individuals to apply for the Newberry's many fellowship opportunities:

Long-Term Fellowships are available to postdoctoral scholars for continuous residence at the Newberry for periods of 4 to 9 months; the stipend is $4,200 per month. Applicants must hold a PhD by the application deadline in order to be eligible. Long-Term Fellowships are intended to support individual scholarly research and promote serious intellectual exchange through active participation in the fellowship program. The deadline for long-term fellowships is November 1.

Short-Term Fellowships are available to postdoctoral scholars, PhD candidates, and those who hold other terminal degrees. Short-Term Fellowships are generally awarded for 1 to 2 months; unless otherwise noted the stipend is $2,500 per month. These fellowships support individual scholarly research for those who have a specific need for the Newberry's collection and are mainly restricted to individuals who live and work outside of the Chicago metropolitan area. The deadline for short-term opportunities is December 15.

Many of the Newberry's fellowship opportunities have specific eligibility requirements; in order to learn more about these requisites, as well as application guidelines, please visit our website. Questions should be addressed to research@newberry.org.

Newberry Fellowship Winner

We are pleased to announce the winner of our 2019-2020 Newberry Fellowship: Cynthia Smith! Cynthia recently received her Ph.D. in literature from Miami University. Her research at the Newberry Library will inform her current book project, Sentimental Sailors: Rescue and Conversion in Antebellum U.S. Literature.

Sentimental Sailors: Rescue and Conversion in Antebellum U.S. Literature, recovers a largely neglected genealogy of sentimental culture that promote non-national forms of personal and collective identity. The “sentimental sailor” is an antebellum ocean figure who rescues those in physical peril, an act which always leads to conversion. Conversion, however, took on multiple meanings throughout the nineteenth century and while sentimental sailors in religious tracts converted the rescued to Christianity, writers who advocated for humanitarian movements used the sentimental sailor in a broad range of genres to influence readers toward abolition, women’s rights, and mariners’ rights. By recovering the sentimental sailor, my project reveals that the maritime world also had a sentimental literary tradition, one that contradicted the nationalist goals of the land-based sentimental heroine by encouraging Americans to convert to humanist values that could see beyond nationalism and the cultural prejudices of their communities.

 

The Midwest Modern Language Association (MMLA) Fellowship

The Newberry Library is now accepting fellowship applications for the 2020-21 academic year! Newberry Library Fellowships provide support to researchers who wish to use our collection. We promise you intriguing and often rare materials; a lively, interdisciplinary community of researchers; individual consultations on your research with staff curators, librarians, and other scholars; and an array of both scholarly and public programs.

The Midwest Modern Language Association (MMLA) Fellowship is a short-term opportunity for scholars working on projects in literary and cultural criticism. Applicants must be members of the Midwest Modern Language Association at the time of application and, if awarded, through the period of their fellowship.

For more information, including a comprehensive list of long- and short-term fellowships opportunities, eligibility requirements, and application guidelines, please visit our website at www.newberry.org/fellowships.

Short-Term Deadline: December 15, 2019

Please circulate this announcement amongst colleagues, students, etc.

Newberry Institute for Research and Education The Newberry Library 60 West Walton Street | Chicago, IL 60610 312-255-3666 | research@newberry.org

 

A New Title in Composition Studies!

Check out The Mad Scientist’s Guide to Composition: A Somewhat Cheeky but Exceedingly Useful Introduction to Academic Writing, by Jeffrey Andrew Weinstock, published by Broadview Press. You can pre-order an exam copy here

 

Upcoming Modern Language Association Prize Competitions

We invite you to submit works to the Modern Language Association's upcoming publication prize competitions. In January 2021, eighteen publication prizes will be presented at the MLA Annual Convention in Toronto. In addition to the James Russell Lowell Prize for an outstanding scholarly work by a member of the association, the MLA Prize for a First Book, and the MLA Prize for Independent Scholars, prizes will be awarded for the following subject areas and genres:

  • studies of Latin American and Spanish literatures and culture
  • comparative literary studies
  • French or francophone linguistic or literary studies
  • literary translations into English
  • studies of black American literature or culture
  • studies of Italian languages, literatures, and culture
  • studies of twentieth- or twenty-first-century literature and thought
  • the teaching of English
  • collaborative, bibliographical, archival, and digital scholarship
  • studies of Germanic language, linguistics, and literature
  • studies of Native American literatures, cultures, and languages
  • manuscripts in Italian literary studies
  • scholarly work in the field of Yiddish

Detailed information on the prize competitions can be found on the MLA Web site, where you can also learn about our new prize for edited collections and about the new eligibility requirements for the James Russell Lowell Prize and the MLA Prize for a First Book. Some prize competitions require MLA membership; authors who are not currently MLA members may become eligible to compete for these prizes by joining the association before the competition’s deadline. For more information, please contact Annie Reiser (646 576 5141 or awards@mla.org)

 

The Newberry is now accepting
fellowship applications for the 2020-21 academic year!

The Newberry Library's long-standing fellowship program provides outstanding scholars with the time, space, and community required to pursue innovative and ground-breaking scholarship. In addition to the Library's collections, fellows are supported by a collegial interdisciplinary community of researchers, curators, and librarians. An array of scholarly and public programs also contributes to an engaging intellectual environment.

We invite interested individuals who wish to utilize the Newberry's collection to apply for our many fellowship opportunities:

Long-Term Fellowships are available to postdoctoral scholars for continuous residence at the Newberry for periods of 4 to 9 months; the stipend is $4,200 per month. Applicants must hold a PhD by the application deadline in order to be eligible. Long-Term Fellowships are intended to support individual scholarly research and promote serious intellectual exchange through active participation in the fellowship program. The deadline for long-term fellowships is November 1.

Short-Term Fellowships are available to postdoctoral scholars, PhD candidates, and those who hold other terminal degrees. Short-Term Fellowships are generally awarded for 1 to 2 months; unless otherwise noted the stipend is $2,500 per month. These fellowships support individual scholarly research for those who have a specific need for the Newberry's collection and are mainly restricted to individuals who live and work outside of the Chicago metropolitan area. The deadline for short-term opportunities is December 15.

Many of the Newberry's fellowship opportunities have specific eligibility requirements; in order to learn more about these requisites, as well as application guidelines, please visit our website. Questions should be addressed to research@newberry.org.


Weimar in 20/20
 

Der Glanz der leeren Mitte ~ The Glamour of the Empty Centre

CFPs Interdisciplinary Symposium May 27-29, 2020

[weimar2020.wordpress.com]weimar2020.wordpress.com

King’s University College at Western University invites abstract submissions for an interdisciplinary symposium aimed at researchers engaged in the political, cultural, and social legacies of the Weimar Republic.

“Weimar in 20/20” tackles the insistent presence – in politics, culture, and social identities – of the Weimar Republic, whose foundational revolutionary impulses reach us today filtered through an intervening century of memory, nostalgia, regrets, and unfinished business. Weimar in the year 2020 is an urgent inspiration and warning: an uncertain blueprint for contemporary politics and values that even in hindsight, we struggle to evaluate clearly, with “20/20” vision.

As a starting point to interrogate this struggle, we propose as a key theme the fraught notion of the “centre”: the preoccupation with structuring a middle ground, of stimulating egalitarianism, of achieving republican consensus in the face of radicalization, partisanship, fragmentation, deep distrust, and disillusionment.

Topics addressing the potential, the successes, and the failures of Weimar’s pursuit of a stable political, cultural, and social “centre” might include:

· The search for political middle ground against a background of polarizing, radical, divisive discourses; competing centrist campaigns;

· Berlin as metropolitan hub: as cultural utopia, as decadent, as cosmopolitan, as commercial nexus;

· Constitutional liberties and freedoms opening “space” for new social identities, aesthetic experimentation, cultural exchange;

· Weimar’s “central” role in defining and critiquing contemporary notions of state, republicanism, nationhood;

· The re-centering of German identity on historical and cultural consciousness;

· The centre as a meeting point: a place of unity and/or consolidating authority; the centre as a gap, deteriorating into an indeterminate political vacuum;

· The dissipation of the centre: the multiplication of discourses of critique; competing voices; frenzied activity in the press and mass culture; Weimar from inside and out; hollow protest; satire; Expressionism; horror;

· Centralizing forces; propaganda; mediating technologies; mass audiences; popular culture;

· Enlightenment optimism crushed by nihilism – the problem and discomfort of emptiness;

· The call to reconstruct the centre; middle ground as a vacant site to (re)build and (re)imagine.

We invite proposals for 30-minute conference papers accessible to an interdisciplinary audience. Abstracts of 350 words should be submitted to weimar@uwo.ca by Sept. 30, 2019. The conference’s working language is English. A peer-reviewed volume is planned as a continuation of the conference discussions.

 

Newberry Institute for Research and Education Seminar

The Archive: Theory, Form, Practice

Fridays, October 4 - December 6, 2019 

The Newberry Library invites graduate students in the humanities to apply for a seminar that will explore the theoretical, critical, and practical methods necessary to negotiate historical and literary archives. The seminar will be held on eight Fridays from October 4 - December 6, 2018 (with no meeting on November 8 & 29). The course will be led by Liesl Olson (Director of Chicago Studies, Newberry Library) and a team of Newberry archivists and curators, including Alison Hinderliter and Catherine Grandgeorge. The seminar will include guest presentations by Brent Edwards (Columbia University) and Matt Kirschenbaum (University of Maryland).

The seminar will provide graduate students with a set of tools essential to doctoral research in any archive. Students will acquire skills that will also broaden their opportunities for career diversity by exposing students to archival work at an independent research library.

The course is ideal for PhD candidates in or beyond their third year of doctoral studies. A cohort of 15 graduate students will be selected to participate. Each participant will receive a $500 award, and lunch will be provided for each session. Travel funding for students outside of the Chicago area is also available.

Applications are due May 28, and applicants will be notified on June 7th. For more information, including how to apply, visit: https://archiveformtheorypractice.com

 

Chicago Research Summit Symposium

October 18, 2019

We are seeking presenters across various disciplines to lead engaging and stimulating sessions about how they are using Chicago-based research pedagogy to enhance undergraduate student learning. We are also interested in sessions that share research, institutional best practices, successful programs, assignments, coursework, and creative approaches to this method of instruction. Lastly, we encourage representatives from Chicago area museums, cultural institutions, and community organizations to submit proposals that highlight their services and collections. Areas of interest include:

  • Engaging Undergraduate Learners
  • Pedagogy and Curricula
  • Facilitating Student Researchers
  • Program Administration and Evaluation
  • Community Partnerships
  • Exploring Chicago Collections

Sessions and panels will be 20 or 40 minutes and should include audience interaction or discussion. The Chicago Research Summit will also include lightning talks, which are a great way to share ideas, collections, assignments, and best practices that don’t warrant a full session.

Submissions for full sessions and lightning talks should include a 150-250 word description of your presentation. Please include outcomes for your audience. To submit a proposal go to the following link: https://www.chicagoresearchsummit.org/present.

The deadline for submitting proposals is June 1, 2019 and the symposium will take place on October 18, 2019. Presenters will be notified in early August 2019 of their proposal status. 

 

Assistant Professor Opening at Park University

Assistant Professor of English - Professional and Technical Writing

The Department of English and Modern Languages at Park University is seeking applications for an Assistant Professor of English - Professional and Technical Writing to teach professional, technical, and first-year writing classes, upper-level rhetoric and composition courses in the English major, and develop courses for an existing minor in professional and technical writing.  This is a full-time, tenure-track position starting August 2019 with a standard teaching load of 4/4 with a mix of face-to-face and online classes.  There is potential for an applicant with the right experience to eventually coordinate first-year or professional writing.  Additional administrative duties come with appropriate release time.  The successful candidate will join a small but active department that values innovative teaching and collaboration.  The candidate selected for this position will be expected to participate in scholarship and engage in service to the department and the university. 

Minimum qualifications:  Ph.D. in professional and technical writing and/or rhetoric and composition with specialization in professional and technical writing from a regionally accredited institution of higher education; Ph.D. is required at time of appointment; evidence of successful teaching of professional, technical, and/or first-year writing courses; cumulative GPA of 3.0 or higher in graduate coursework.  

Desirable qualifications: experience teaching and designing online courses; experience working with diverse student populations; experience designing new courses in professional and technical writing; experience in writing program administration.

Qualified applicants should upload a curriculum vitae, cover letter, transcripts, brief statement of teaching philosophy, and 3 letters of recommendation (at least 2 of which emphasize teaching proficiency).  

Review of applications will begin on November 19, 2018 and will continue until the position is filled.   The candidate selected for this position must be able to meet eligibility requirements for work in the United States at the time the appointment is scheduled to begin and continue working legally for the proposed term of employment.   Park University, a private, not-for-profit University, founded in 1875, offers academic programs at 40 campus centers nationwide and online. The main campus is located approximately 10 minutes north of downtown Kansas City on the bluffs overlooking the Missouri River, in Parkville, Missouri.  Park University has an excellent benefits package including health and life insurance, retirement plan, and tuition paid undergraduate classes for employees and dependents. Park University is an equal opportunity employer and encourages applications from women and minorities.  

Questions about the position can be directed to:

Dr. Silvia Byer and Dr. Stacey Kikendall, Search Committee Co-Chairs, Dept. of English and Modern Languages

Byer@park.edu 

Stacey.kikendall@park.edu

  

The MLA Publication Award is now accepting submissions

We invite you to submit works and to call attention to the Modern Language Association’s upcoming publication prize competitions. In January 2020, eighteen publication prizes will be presented at the MLA Annual Convention in Seattle. In addition to the James Russell Lowell Prize for an outstanding scholarly work by a member of the association and the MLA Prize for a First Book, prizes will be awarded for the following subject areas and genres:

  • studies of Latin American and Spanish literatures and culture
  • comparative literary studies
  • French or francophone linguistic or literary studies
  • literary translations into English
  • scholarly translations into English
  • studies of black American literature or culture
  • studies of Italian languages, literatures, and culture
  • studies of twentieth- or twenty-first-century literature and thought
  • the teaching of languages other than English
  • scholarly editions of letters
  • scholarly editions of literary works
  • studies of Slavic language, linguistics, and literature
  • Latina and Latino or Chicana and Chicano literary and cultural studies
  • manuscripts in Italian literary studies

Detailed information on the prize competitions, including the number of copies required for submission, can be found on the MLA Web site.

Please note that books may compete for either the James Russell Lowell Prize or the MLA Prize for a First Book and one other prize, provided they meet eligibility requirements. Only books published in 2018 may compete for the annual prizes and for the Aldo and Jeanne Scaglione Prize for Italian Studies; for biennial prizes, books published in 2017 and 2018 are eligible. Each prize consists of a cash award and a certificate.

Some prize competitions require MLA membership; authors who are not currently MLA members may become eligible to compete for these prizes by joining the association before the competition’s deadline.

For more information, please contact Annie Reiser (646 576-5141; awards@mla.org).