Loyola University Chicago

Office of Student Conduct & Conflict Resolution

Division of Student Development

Assigned Outcomes

When a student or student organization is found in violation of the Community Standards, any of the following types of assigned outcomes may be assigned. In certain cases, the OSCCR may convene a restorative justice conference to allow the impacted parties and respondent to co-determine the outcomes with the assistance of a trained facilitator.

In all cases, outcomes should be appropriate to the violation(s) for which they are assigned, considering the following:

  • the context and seriousness of the violation;
  • the respondent’s demonstrated commitment not to engage in the same behavior in the future;
  • the respondent’s prior conduct history (if applicable); and
  • outcomes that appropriately foster accountability for one’s behavior, prevent recurrence of similar behaviors, and repair harm.

Compliance with all assigned outcomes within the time allocated is mandatory. Failure to complete or comply with any assigned outcome or failure to meet an assigned deadline (if applicable) may result in further disciplinary action including, but not limited to, a $150 late fee and/or placing a disciplinary hold on a student’s University account preventing the student from registering/adding a course until the assigned outcome(s) is completed.

Students may be assigned various educational programs focused on alcohol and other drugs, and must make a good faith effort to attend and engage in the program. Such programs include, but are not limited to: Alcohol Edu for Sanctions (online module), CHOICES, Brief Alcohol Screening and Intervention for College Students (BASICS), and Motivational Intervention for Marijuana. Students may also be referred to the Chapman Center at Evanston Hospital for additional services related to alcohol and other drug abuse and dependency.

Educational experiences or projects may include attendance and participation in an event, workshop, special project, or other initiative. Such experiences provide space for students to reflect upon their conduct; to identify harm to self, to others, or to the community; to explore why such conduct was unacceptable; and/or to educate other students about the University’s Community Standards. Examples of such projects include reflection or research papers about a specific topic or issue and/or participation in the Campus Involvement Challenge, Restore LUREC, or the Values Workshop. Deadlines for educational experiences may vary.

Fines are monetary costs intended to dissuade students from violating the Community Standards. Fines may be paid directly to the OSCCR by delivering or mailing a check, money order, or cash in the exact amount of bills to the OSCCR suite on the third floor of the Damen Student Center. Checks should be payable to Loyola University Chicago. Fines collected are used by the University to fund services and programs for students. Failure to pay a fine will result in the amount being billed directly to the student’s University account (no penalty is assigned if a student chooses to have the amount billed). Fines must typically be paid within two weeks of assignment.

Students who have engaged in misconduct may temporarily or permanently forfeit certain privileges otherwise afforded to them. Examples include but are not limited to: restrictions on guest privileges in the residence halls; restrictions on access to the University network, email, or other computing systems; and restrictions from accessing certain facilities, programs, or services of the University (such as the shuttle bus, Halas Recreation Center, the Information Commons [“IC”], specific residence halls, study abroad programs, etc.). In some cases, students may be reassigned to a different living space.

Residence hall expulsion requires a student to vacate an assigned residence hall room or apartment permanently, with the understanding that the student may not return to, enter, visit, or reside in any residence hall of Loyola University Chicago in the future. Dismissed students must comply with all Residence Life vacancy procedures, including properly turning in keys and checking-out of the hall. All access to the residence halls will be terminated and housing fees may be forfeited. Students who have been dismissed from the residence halls may not study abroad.

Residence hall probation is formal notice that a student’s behavior or pattern of behavior was unacceptable and caused harm to the residential community. During the probation period, students should demonstrate a willingness and ability to respect and comply with the standards of behavior appropriate to residence hall life. Students may be required to resign any office or committee appointment associated with Residence Life or its affiliated student organizations. Continued misconduct of any kind (even of a kind different from that which resulted in probation) during the probation period may result in University Probation or residence hall suspension or expulsion. Residence hall probation is typically assigned for a minimum of the rest of the semester, and may be assigned for up to two years.

Residence hall suspension requires a student to vacate an assigned residence hall room or apartment for a specified period of time, with the understanding that student may return to a space within the residence hall system at the conclusion of that period. Suspended students must comply with all Residence Life vacancy procedures, including properly turning in keys and checking-out of the hall. All access to the residence halls will be terminated and students may not enter into or visit any residence hall during the suspension period. Housing fees may be forfeited. Students on residence hall suspension may not study abroad, and may not be approved to study abroad until 90 days after their suspension period has ended. Residence hall suspension is typically assigned for a minimum of the rest of the semester, and may be assigned for up to two years.

Restitution is monetary compensation required of students who have taken, misused, damaged, or destroyed University, public, or private property or services. Amounts charged to students may include cost to repair, replace, recover, clean, or otherwise account for the property or services affected.

Restorative service hours may be assigned to provide students the opportunity to symbolically repair harm caused and restore a sense of balance in the community. All service hours must be completed (a) at a non-profit organization, (b) under supervision of an employee or volunteer coordinator who is not a relative of the student, and (c) without payment or other compensation for the work performed. Restorative service hours may, but need not, be completed for an office or department of Loyola University Chicago. Restorative service hours may not count towards service learning hours or other community service required by another program, scholarship, or organization. Court-mandated community service may count towards restorative service hours. In some cases, students will be directed to complete their service under the guidance of a specific staff or faculty member. Deadlines for restorative service hours vary based on number of hours, academic calendar, and other factors.

Any outcome may be modified to apply to registered or sponsored student organizations. Additionally, certain outcomes will only apply to student organizations. For example, an organization’s national representatives, officers, and/or advisors may be officially notified of the incident as part of an outcome. In cases of serious or repeated misconduct by a student organization, the organization’s registration may be suspended (temporary) or terminated (permanent). Suspension/termination prohibits the organization, its members, and its supporters from conducting any activity on any University campus or at any University-associated event that in any way promotes the goals, purposes, identity, programs, or activities of the organization.

Expulsion from the University (also commonly known as dismissal) is the most serious University disciplinary action and means the permanent exclusion of the student from the University. Expulsion may include: forfeiture of all rights and degrees not actually conferred at the time of the expulsion; notification of the expulsion to the student, the student’s college, and the student’s parents or guardians; permanent notation of the expulsion on the student’s disciplinary record; withdrawal from all courses (resulting in “W” grades); and forfeiture of tuition and fees. Any student expelled from the University must refrain from visiting the University premises except when engaged in official business approved in advance and in writing by the Dean of Students.

University probation is formal notice that a student’s behavior or pattern of behavior was unacceptable and caused harm to the University community. During the probation period, students should demonstrate a willingness and ability to respect and comply with the standards of behavior appropriate to a Jesuit, Catholic university. Continued misconduct of any kind (even of a kind different from that which resulted in probation) during the probation period may result in University suspension or expulsion. University probation is typically assigned for a minimum of the rest of the semester, and may last until graduation.

For student organizations placed on University probation, the organization is ineligible to request money from the Student Activity Fund for the duration of their disciplinary period.

University suspension involves the temporary removal of the student from the University for a specified period of time, with the understanding that the student may be returned to good standing at the completion of the suspension period after having satisfied any accompanying conditions. Suspension from the University further entails being withdrawn from all enrolled courses (resulting in “W” grades), forfeiting all applicable fees, and restriction from visiting the University premises except when engaged in official business approved by the Dean of Students. University suspension may also include any other disciplinary action that is judged to be of value to the student. Persons notified of a student’s University suspension status may include: parents or guardians, academic deans, Campus Safety, or other appropriate personnel at the discretion of the Dean of Students. Suspended students may not study abroad or travel with the University, and may not be approved to study abroad until 90 days after their suspension period has ended. University suspension is typically assigned for a minimum of the rest of the semester and may last any number of years.

When a suspension period is over and the student has completed the conditions accompanying the suspension, the student must contact the Office of the Dean of Students requesting reinstatement and providing documentation demonstrating that the student has satisfied the terms of the suspension (if applicable). The Dean of Students may, if needed, require a meeting with the student before permitting re-enrollment. The student may re-enroll at the University only after the Dean of Students has made an affirmative decision, notified the student, and released the hold on the student’s University account.

A University Warning is an official notice to the student that the student’s conduct was inappropriate and violated the Community Standards. University Warnings are only assigned for relatively minor violations.

Any reasonable outcome may be assigned that appropriately promotes the education and development of a student or student organization, ensures safety, or otherwise furthers the mission of the OSCCR.