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The intersection of physics and health care.

Medical Physics applies physics concepts and techniques to health care. Medical Physicists use a comprehensive knowledge of imaging, radiation therapy, and technology to help physicians diagnose and treat diseases. They work in clinics, hospitals, and university medical centers in departments of Radiology, Radiation Oncology, Nuclear Medicine, and Radiation Safety, as well as within industry. Loyola's new, two-year Master of Medical Physics degree offers a unique opportunity to learn alongside working health care professionals and leading experts in the field.

Our commitment to you

Graduates with a Master's in Medical Physics will have the knowledge, skills, and professional values to begin a career in Medical Physics.

Knowledge

  • Learn how radiation interacts with matter
  • Understand the mathematical theory of medical image formation
  • Master the concepts of image quality and quality control
  • Learn the principles of radiation protection and safety
  • Evaluate and understand image-based anatomy
  • Understand molecular, cellular, tissue, organ and organismal effects of ionizing radiation

Skills

  • Solve problems in medicine related to how radiation interacts with tissues in the human body
  • Use scientific principles to interpret radiation measurement data
  • Measure and quantify radiation within an oncology environment
  • Analyze data from radiation measurements to determine absorbed dose
  • Use research to solve problems in physics related to radiation oncology
  • Analyze and interpret trends and problems in medical physics     

Professional Values

  • Dedication to the development and delivery of consistent, effective, and safe radiation therapy to all patients
  • Communication and interpersonal skills to collaborate in a multidisciplinary environment

Curriculum

The MSMP Program provides a solid foundation of coursework to prepare graduates for clinical residency programs and the first part of the American Board of Radiology exam.

Core Courses

  • Biostatistics (MPBH 409)
  • Interactions of Radiation with Matter
  • Image-Based Anatomy & Physiology
  • Medical Physics Seminar (Two semesters)
  • Physics and Mathematics of Medical Imaging I
  • Physics and Mathematics of Medical Imaging II 
  • Practicum in the Physics of Medical Imaging I
  • Physics of Radiation Therapy
  • Practicum in the Physics of Radiation Therapy I
  • Professionalism and Ethics (BEHL 406 – Principles of Health Care Ethics OR BEHL 427 – Professionalism and Professional Ethics OR BEHP 405 – Research Ethics)
  • Radiation/Cancer Biology 
  • Radiation Protection and Safety

Electives

  • Physics and Mathematics of Medical Imaging II 
    OR 
  • Practicum in the Physics of Radiation Therapy II

Capstone Project

Students will work with a faculty member to identify a topic and perform in-depth research, resulting in a paper of sufficient quality to be submitted to one of the recognized journals in the field (i.e, Medical PhysicsPhysics in Medicine and Biology; International Journal of Radiation Oncology, Biology, Physics). 

Admission

Students entering the program will be required to have a strong foundation in Physics, demonstrated either by having an undergraduate (BA/BS) or graduate (MS/PhD) degree in Physics. Prospective students with other majors (including a degree in engineering or other physical sciences) will be considered after demonstrating that they have coursework equivalent to a minor in Physics (including three upper-level courses).  

Specific requirements include:

  • Graduate record exam (GRE)
  • Three letters of recommendation
  • GPA of 3.0 or greater (out of a 4.0 scale)

Application deadline: March 15, 2020

Learn more about the application process.

Tuition and Fees

The Parkinson School of Health Sciences and Public Health and Loyola's Financial Aid Office are committed to helping students secure the financial resources to make their education at Loyola affordable.

Cost information will be available soon.