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Loyola Receives $6 Million Gift

0817-PRES-Schreiber-Arrupe-Gift

August 7, 2017

Dear Members of the Loyola Community,

We are pleased to announce Loyola University Chicago has received a $6 million gift to support scholarships for students and graduates of Arrupe College. The gift will provide scholarship support to students enrolled at Arrupe College as well as those who have graduated and transferred to another college or school within Loyola to earn their bachelor's degree.

Read the Chicago Tribune story highlighting the gift and Arrupe College's upcoming Commencement.

The scholarship support is a gift from Loyola alumnus John G. Schreiber and his wife, Kathy Schreiber, who intend for the funds to assist students who are ineligible for federal and state aid as a result of their immigration status. The gift will be split between current-use scholarships and long-term support.

John and Kathy have a history of significant philanthropic support for Loyola. In 2008, they established a $500,000 scholarship endowment at Loyola for students from Lake County, which has supported nearly 30 students to date. In 2014, they made a $10 million gift to Loyola's Quinlan School of Business. In recognition of that gift, the 10-story home of the business school was named the John and Kathy Schreiber Center. Mr. Schreiber graduated from Loyola's Undergraduate School of Business Administration in 1968. After graduating from Harvard Business School in 1970, Mr. Schreiber went on to a 20-year career in real estate investment management as a partner in Chicago-based JMB Realty Corporation. He retired from JMB in 1990 and in 1992 founded the New York-based Blackstone Group's real estate investment management business. He retired from Blackstone in 2015.

We are extraordinarily grateful to John and Kathy for their generous gift of support for our Arrupe College students. Their unwavering commitment to promising young women and men, most significantly through their sponsoring gift to the Schreiber Center at Loyola, has had a transformative impact on our students. This new philanthropic support for students in Arrupe College will enable talented students, many of whom are the first in their families to pursue a higher education degree, to reach their fullest potential and become persons for others. We are honored to partner with John and Kathy to ensure that a diversity of students have access to and benefit from Loyola's Jesuit, Catholic education.

Please join us in thanking John and Kathy Schreiber for their extraordinary support. We hope you will also take some time to read the Chicago Tribune article that appeared in the print edition today related to the gift and Arrupe College's upcoming Commencement on August 12.

Sincerely,

Jo Ann Rooney, JD, LLM, EdD
President

Damon Cates, EdD 
Senior Vice President for Advancement

Wayne Magdziarz Appointed Chief Financial Officer/Chief Business Officer

August 3, 2017

Dear Members of the Loyola Community,

I am delighted to announce the appointment of Wayne Magdziarz as senior vice president and chief financial officer/chief business officer (CFO/CBO), effective immediately.

For the past 14 years, Wayne has served as senior vice president for Capital Planning and Campus Management. In this role, he has overseen all aspects of our campus and facilities management, led our multi-campus redevelopment projects, and guided the acquisition, construction, leasing, and sale of more than $1 billion in capital assets, including the creation of our in-house investment property management organization.

In this new role as CFO/CBO, Wayne will lead and integrate all the finance, capital planning, and campus management functions under one division. This important consolidation will allow the University to better steward its resources, focus on our key strategic financial objectives, and organize and leverage our finance and other business functions. This integration will better serve the campus community and address the challenges and opportunities we face in the evolving higher education landscape.

Wayne is a double Loyola alumnus, earning his bachelor's degree in radio and television in 1982 and his MBA in 1987. He has worked at Loyola for more than 35 years, the last 25 as a University officer. Early in his career, he managed the University's FM radio station and later joined the faculty, teaching courses in radio and TV production for nine years. Wayne transitioned into administration at Loyola in 1990, and he has overseen many different University operations while serving four University presidents. His long and distinguished tenure with Loyola includes service to the University’s Board of Trustees as well as service on the President’s Cabinet and the Budget Review Team. In addition to his administrative work, Wayne serves on the Finance Council for Holy Name Cathedral, co-hosts a radio show for the Archdiocese of Chicago several times a month, and is a key University liaison and partner to the Archdiocese. Wayne’s personal commitment to Loyola, and to our unique Jesuit, Catholic mission, will greatly benefit the University and all our students in his new expanded role.

Please join me in congratulating Wayne on this appointment.

Sincerely,

Jo Ann Rooney, JD, LLM, EdD
President

Father Garanzini’s Next Step

July 18, 2017

Dear Members of the Loyola Community,

After serving for two years as chancellor, Michael J. Garanzini, S.J., will step down from this role, as he has accepted a visiting research faculty position at Fordham University, where he previously taught in 1998–1999. This move to New York City will enable Father Garanzini to focus on his expanding global responsibilities as secretary for higher education for the Society of Jesus, including the launch of a new International Association of Jesuit Universities.

As chancellor, Father Garanzini has been supportive of the transition to new leadership, while furthering Loyola’s development priorities and advancing international projects, including the John Felice Rome Center (JFRC). 

Father Garanzini’s legacy as Loyola’s president (2001–2015) is embodied by the transformation and expansion of our campuses, booming enrollments, a robust and integrative student experience, a renewed emphasis on health sciences education and research, sound financial management, fundraising success, and the University’s emphasis on global education and engagement. During his tenure as president, he prioritized expanding Loyola’s global footprint by establishing partnerships abroad, welcoming international students, ensuring the future of the historic JFRC, and launching academic program opportunities in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam, and Beijing.

In recognition of his extraordinary contributions to global education, we are proud to announce the formation of the Michael J. Garanzini, S.J., Scholars Program, which will assist students for years to come in their pursuit of life-changing, study-abroad opportunities.

Father Garanzini shared that he is grateful to the Loyola community—our esteemed faculty, staff, alumni, donors, and community partners—for its tireless commitment to moving Loyola forward together during his tenure. He expressed his appreciation for all current and former trustees whose advice and support were essential to the University’s success. Lastly, he is especially grateful for his time with our exceptional students who he says have been a constant source of inspiration and joy for him.

Father Garanzini also shared with us his future aspiration to develop a research center that might support and supplement his work in building a worldwide collaborative network of Jesuit education when he eventually steps down from his role as secretary. In recognition of his commitment and service to our community over the last 16 years—as president, CEO, and chancellor—the Board of Trustees and University leadership have made a financial commitment to his ongoing work.   

Please join us in recognizing Father Garanzini and expressing our gratitude for his transformative contributions to Loyola University Chicago, our campus communities, and most importantly, our students. 

Sincerely,

Bob Parkinson (BBA '73, MBA '75)
Chairman, Board of Trustees

Jo Ann Rooney, JD, LLM, EdD
President

Reflecting on the Academic Year

May 4, 2017

Dear Members of the Loyola Community,

The end of the spring semester is upon us, and we are preparing to congratulate the more than 4,000 students who will walk across the stage at this year's Commencement ceremonies. As we conclude the academic year and I reflect on my first year at Loyola, the many interactions with our talented students, faculty, staff, trustees, donors, and friends who are so passionately devoted to and invested in Loyola have stood out and been a source of inspiration to me. Their unwavering commitment to our Jesuit, Catholic heritage and mission is truly extraordinary and something for which we should all be thankful.

Access, Affordability, and Innovation
As we have discussed throughout the year at numerous meetings and forums, we are in a financially strong position at Loyola to proactively address numerous challenges that face us—and all of higher education—related to affordability, access, and financial stewardship. For us, it is about balancing that dynamic tension between cura personalis and cura apostolica, with both being rooted in our mission. Entering the next academic year, our strong recruitment efforts will bring a bright and diverse group of new undergraduate students to Loyola in the fall, as we continue working hard to ensure that as many students as possible—both new and returning—have access to our transformative education. The tuition increase for the 2017–18 academic year for continuing students was deliberately designed to be significantly lower than in recent years. This past February, we launched a year-long comprehensive review of our operational and fiscal priorities, which includes the participation of faculty, staff, and administrators on five financial working groups. These University-wide efforts will enable us to strategically plan mid- and long-term for the benefit of the institution and, most especially, for our students both present and future.

As we look forward together, our focus must continue to be on innovation and Plan 2020, maximizing opportunities to attract and retain new students; diversifying and building our revenue streams; growing our endowments and expanding our alumni engagement; establishing new partnerships with corporations, communities, and foundations; and enhancing translational research across all our campuses. Not only will innovation be key to the future of Loyola University Chicago but it will ensure that we are preparing our students in the best possible ways for future professions and challenges that are not even on our radar today. We are already guiding our students’ growth and skills in areas like critical thinking, communication, and complex problem-solving and reasoning, which will continue to be key in expanding global interactions. The new Student Innovation Fund, announced in the spring, was developed to encourage direct student involvement and has already received a dozen applications by students and registered student organizations across our campuses with more expected this fall. This initiative, coupled with the Academic Innovation Fund and Innovation Team that was announced earlier this year, is the first step in inspiring all of us to embrace innovation—doing things differently, acting on new opportunities for growth, and positioning our financial and human resources to support the highest mission-critical work.

New Leadership
In March, we were delighted to announce that Michael Kaufman, JD, was appointed dean of the School of Law, and this week we enthusiastically welcomed Damon Cates, EdD, as our new senior vice president for advancement and Steve A. N. Goldstein, MD, PhD, as dean of the Stritch School of Medicine. This summer, we will be joined by Goutham Menon, PhD, the new School of Social Work dean, and Michael Andrews, PhD, the new director of our John Felice Rome Center. Each of these talented academic and administrative leaders brings extraordinary experience, acumen, and a commitment to our Jesuit, Catholic mission, and their contributions to Loyola will greatly benefit the University and our broader communities.

Civic Engagement and Civil Discourse
The passionate engagement of students, faculty, and staff in the series of University-hosted civic engagement and civil discourse events this semester wonderfully reflects the desire of Loyolans to gather as members of a shared, diverse community to discuss, debate, and deliberate different perspectives and viewpoints on important issues. Our institutional promise—to embrace difficult societal issues facing us and the broader communities—is central to the success of Plan 2020 and, even more importantly, to the experience of our students, faculty, and staff that make up the Loyola community. This is the way for us to influence the future of our communities and society in ways leading to positive transformation. We will renew our efforts to create ongoing, meaningful opportunities for dialogue and debate this fall, and to further engagement by all so that we can realize the ambitious goals we have set for ourselves.

Many in our Loyola community will spend the summer participating in internships and service learning, continuing studies both locally and abroad, conducting research, and preparing to welcome students back for the fall semester. Despite this busy agenda, I encourage each of you to take some time to step back, recharge, and enjoy the summer months. On a special note for those of you who are graduating this month, congratulations on this milestone achievement! All of us at Loyola are very proud of every one of you and look forward to the many ways that you will embody the words of St. Ignatius and "set the world on fire."

Sincerely,

Jo Ann Rooney, JD, LLM, EdD
President

Gender-Based Violence Climate Survey

April 19, 2017

Dear Colleagues,

I am writing to invite you to participate in Loyola’s Gender-Based Violence Climate Survey. This survey is a shorter version of a survey sent to all students two weeks ago. These surveys will help us to examine the prevalence and incidence of sexual assault, sexual harassment, and other gender-based violence in our community. They will also help us gain invaluable insight and understanding of attitudes about the campus climate regarding sexual misconduct and about knowledge of University resources available to students, faculty, and staff.

While your participation is completely voluntary, I am asking each of you to please complete the survey. Your feedback will help us to better address instances of sexual assault and other gender-based violence, prioritize education and training initiatives, and improve our collective efforts to care for one another as members of this campus community.

The survey results will be compiled in summary form to ensure confidentiality, and you may skip any survey questions that you do not wish to answer. The summary survey findings as well as planned action steps in response to the results will be shared with the campus community in the fall. The survey will be open through May 14, 2017.

Thank you in advance for your participation and for your commitment to creating a culture of care and respect for all members of our Loyola community.

The survey invitation and link will be sent to you in the coming days.

Sincerely,

Jo Ann Rooney, JD, LLM, EdD
President

An Easter Message from Dr. Rooney

April 12, 2017

Dear Members of the Loyola Community,

As Catholics worldwide begin our celebration of Holy Week and Easter, we enter into the most sacred days of the Christian calendar in which we remember the suffering, death, and Resurrection of Jesus Christ. The cross represents for us the paradox of our faith—that in dying one attains eternal life. Christ’s ultimate victory over suffering and death gives us hope in a time when we experience suffering and death both locally and globally. Chicago’s Cardinal Blase J. Cupich has spoken out about the suffering of so many who have been affected by the street violence in our neighborhoods, and we stand with all people who are working for a community of compassion, peace, and forgiveness. Loyola’s mission inspires us to stand in solidarity with people of goodwill, and because of our faith in redemption and reconciliation, we engage in the hard work for social justice even when the challenges may seem insurmountable. Easter teaches all of us that even in the darkest times, Loyola’s mission to bring about a city and world built on human dignity will not be ultimately thwarted. Love will prevail.

On April 10, our Jewish community started the celebration of Passover, which commemorates the Hebrews, who God has claimed as His own people, being led from slavery to freedom. We join the Jewish community in rejoicing over God’s desire for human freedom so that we might contribute to God’s work in the world that He created, and therefore, loves.

I want to take this opportunity to wish all of the Loyola community a Happy Easter and Happy Passover.

Sincerely,

Jo Ann Rooney, JD, LLM, EdD
President

Invitation to Faculty Receptions Hosted by the President and Provosts

April 10, 2017

Dear Colleagues,

We are writing to invite you to join us at a reception for faculty this spring. As the academic year is nearing its close, these events will offer us an opportunity to socialize and enjoy camaraderie with colleagues. Cocktails and hors d’oeuvres will be served, and no RSVP is necessary. Please see below for reception details.

Water Tower Campus
Monday, April 24
4–6 p.m.
Lewis Towers, Beane Hall, 13th Floor

Lake Shore Campus
Tuesday, April 25
4–6 p.m.
Piper Hall

Health Sciences Campus
Tuesday, May 2
4:30–6 p.m.
Cuneo Center, Atrium

We hope that you will join us for one of these events and encourage you to invite a colleague to join you.

Sincerely,

Jo Ann Rooney, JD, LLM, EdD
President

John P. Pelissero, PhD
Provost and
Chief Academic Officer

Margaret Faut Callahan,
CRNA, PhD, FNAP, FAAN
Provost, Health Sciences
Division

April is Sexual Assault Awareness Month

March 31, 2017

Dear Students,

I am writing to invite you to participate in Loyola's Gender-Based Violence Climate Survey. This survey will allow us to examine the prevalence and incidence of sexual assault and other gender-based violence in our community, attitudes among students about the campus climate regarding sexual misconduct, and knowledge of University resources available to students.

I am asking each of you to participate in this important survey. Every response gives us invaluable insight, which will help us enhance student life at Loyola University Chicago. Your participation in this survey will help us to better address instances of sexual assault and enable us to fulfill our mission to care for one another as members of this community. The survey will be open to students until the end of the spring 2017 semester.

Your participation in this survey effort is fully voluntary, and you may skip any questions that you do not wish to answer. All survey responses are completely confidential and data will never be connected with individuals, nor will the information be used to identify individuals in any manner. The survey results will be compiled in summary form to ensure confidentiality. The summary survey findings and planned action steps in response to the results will be shared with the campus community in the fall.

The results of the survey will inform our University-wide efforts and will help us ensure our Jesuit, Catholic mission to uphold the dignity of every person. Your participation in this survey is one meaningful way to actualize our Student Promise—care for self, others, and community. Thank you in advance for your participation and for your commitment to creating a culture of care for all members of our community.

The survey invitation and link will be sent to you next week.

Sincerely,

Jo Ann Rooney, JD, LLM, EdD
President

The Graduate School and Research Services Leadership Announcement

March 31, 2017

Dear Members of the Loyola Community,

We write to announce the appointment of new leadership for The Graduate School and the Office of Research Services. Thomas Regan, S.J., PhD, dean of the College of Arts and Sciences and academic dean of St. Joseph College Seminary, will assume the additional duties of dean of The Graduate School, effective May 15, 2017.

Father Regan succeeds the late Samuel Attoh, PhD, who passed away on February 6, 2017, and had served as dean since 2005. Father Regan joined Loyola’s Department of Philosophy in 2011—where he also directs the Jesuit First Studies Program—and was appointed interim dean of the College of Arts and Sciences in 2014 and later dean in 2015. Prior to joining Loyola, Father Regan served in a number of administrative and faculty positions at other Jesuit institutions, including Fordham University, Loyola Marymount University, Fairfield University, and Boston College. A past president of the Jesuit Philosophical Association, in 2003 Father Regan was appointed to a six-year term as provincial of the New England Province of the Society of Jesus, where he served on the Jesuit Conference’s Higher Education Committee, a role that entailed continuous dialogue with university presidents, other provincials, and presidents of the Association of Jesuit Colleges and Universities.

Terri Pigott, PhD, dean of the School of Education, has been appointed associate provost for research for the lakeside campuses. Dr. Pigott succeeds Dr. Attoh, who also oversaw the Office of Research Services. Dr. Pigott has served in positions of progressive leadership in the School of Education and has served as associate dean (2013–15) and dean since 2015. A professor of research methodology and an internationally recognized scholar in meta-analysis and hierarchical linear modeling, Dr. Pigott joined the Loyola faculty in 1998. Prior to Loyola, she served as associate program officer at the Spencer Foundation in Chicago from 1996–98. Dr. Pigott has received grants from the Spencer Foundation, Chicago Community Trust, and the American Educational Research Association. She has served on research review panels for the Institute of Education Sciences, the National Science Foundation, and the Agency for Healthcare Research Quality. We thank Dr. Pigott for her leadership in the School of Education, during which time she led the effort for successful accreditation/reaccreditation of programs in teacher preparation, school psychology, and counseling psychology; increased the School of Education’s U.S. News & World Report ranking from 99 to 85; and achieved national recognition for the undergraduate teacher preparation program. She assumes her new role and responsibilities on July 1, 2017.

We would also like to thank Patricia Mooney-Melvin, PhD, who has served as the interim dean of The Graduate School since July 2015. Dr. Mooney-Melvin announced in January a plan to resume full-time duties as an associate professor of history, having also provided leadership to The Graduate School programs as associate dean since August 2006. We are grateful for the many contributions that she has made to the enhancement of graduate studies at Loyola.

Please join us in thanking Dr. Mooney-Melvin for her service and in congratulating Deans Regan and Pigott on their new roles in support of graduate education and research at Loyola.

Sincerely,

Jo Ann Rooney, JD, LLM, EdD
President        

John P. Pelissero, PhD
Provost and Chief Academic Officer

Robert A. Munson Steps Down as Senior Vice President and Chief Financial Officer

March 30, 2017

Dear Members of the Loyola Community,

I would like to announce that Robert A. Munson has submitted his resignation as Loyola's senior vice president and chief financial officer, effective Friday, April 28, 2017. Rob has accepted the role of controller at MVDconnect in Cincinnati. He shared that his decision was primarily influenced by personal priorities to foster greater access to his family and friends in the Cincinnati area.

Rob joined Loyola in August 2014 and serves as a member of the President's Cabinet, and he has exhibited an unwavering commitment to our Jesuit mission, vision, and values. During his tenure with the University, Rob has worked diligently to co-chair the Budget Review Team, worked with Trinity Health to finalize details of our relationship, replaced the internal audit function with a successful request for proposal and engagement of Baker Tilly, and successfully hired staff into key positions within Financial Services. In addition, Rob worked to improve Board of Trustees and committee meeting materials and foster campus-wide collaboration toward enhancing revenues and reducing expenses. We acknowledge Rob's efforts and thank him for his unconditional commitment and dedication.

A national search to hire a new chief financial officer will be initiated immediately; however, I anticipate that it may take several months to identify and engage high-caliber candidates with the experience to support the scope and responsibility of this important role. An interim chief financial officer will be identified and appointed to continue the work of the role during the recruitment period.

On behalf of the Board of Trustees and the senior leadership team, I would like to personally thank Rob for the good work that he has done for Loyola over the past few years.

Please join me in congratulating Rob on his new professional opportunity and in wishing him and his wife, Laurie, the best of luck with their future endeavors and on their relocation back to Cincinnati.

Sincerely,

Jo Ann Rooney, JD, LLM, EdD
President

Steve A. N. Goldstein, MD, PhD, Appointed Dean of the Stritch School of Medicine

March 17, 2017

Dear Members of the Loyola Community,

We are pleased to announce that Steve A. N. Goldstein, MD, PhD, has been named dean of the Stritch School of Medicine. Dr. Goldstein will join Loyola on May 1, 2017.

Dr. Goldstein's background includes more than 30 years of extensive experience in health sciences research, medical education, and higher education administration. He is a renowned physician-investigator, administrator, educator, pediatric cardiologist, and biophysical researcher. His career includes service at Harvard University, Yale University, The University of Chicago, and Brandeis University.

He joins Loyola from Brandeis University, where he currently serves as university professor of biochemistry. From 2011–2014, Dr. Goldstein was also provost and senior vice president for academic affairs. While at The University of Chicago from 2004–2011, he was a professor in many areas including pediatrics, cancer center, computational neuroscience, molecular medicine, neurobiology, and pharmacology and pharmacogenomics. Dr. Goldstein was also director of the Pediatrician-Scientist Training Program, chair of the Department of Pediatrics, founding director of the Institute of Molecular Pediatric Science, founding co-principal investigator and advisor of the Clinical and Translational Science Award–Institute for Translational Medicine, and founding physician-in-chief of the Comer Children's Hospital. From 1993–2004, Dr. Goldstein was on the faculty at Yale University where he rose to full professor and founded the Section of Developmental Biology and Biophysics.

At Brandeis, Dr. Goldstein reorganized operations to improve services and decrease costs and he implemented transparent, mission-based budgeting, allowing for reallocations to academic priorities. These actions produced the first balanced budget in a decade concurrent with a tripling of investment in deferred maintenance, creation of new academic programs, hiring of new faculty, and the construction of new facilities. Dr. Goldstein led the development of the Brandeis strategic plan, spearheaded diversity initiatives, created an innovation center to speed technology transfer, launched a center for teaching and learning, introduced policies yielding the largest applicant pools and highest academic profiles in school history, and directed major new philanthropic initiatives.

Dr. Goldstein holds both a Doctor of Medicine and Doctor of Philosophy in Immunology from Harvard University. He received his Master of Arts in Biochemistry from Brandeis University. Dr. Goldstein's research interests include ion channels and how they function in disease and health. His research has identified genetic and mechanistic bases for Sudden Infant Death Syndrome in African Americans, inherited and drug-induced cardiac arrhythmias, skeletal muscle disorders, and ischemic stroke. His work has advanced methods in interventional cardiology and produced diagnostic tests and techniques for translational investigations including real-time, single molecule spectroscopy and the creation of de novo neuropeptides based on natural products that target orphan receptors to treat disease. A fellow of the American Academy of Pediatrics, Dr. Goldstein received the prestigious E. Mead Johnson Award from the Society of Pediatrics in 2001 for his research contributions. He has served as a scientific advisor to the National Institutes of Health for Nanomedicine and is currently vice chair of the National Science Foundation Advisory Committee for Biological Sciences.

We would like to thank the members of the search committee who efficiently and successfully led this national search. We are especially grateful to Terry R. Light, MD, who not only chaired the search committee, but also has served as interim dean of the Stritch School of Medicine since January 1, 2017. He will continue to lead our medical school until Dr. Goldstein assumes his full-time duties on May 22, 2017 after Commencement.

Please join us in thanking Dr. Light for his continued leadership and welcoming Dr. Goldstein to Loyola.

Sincerely,

Jo Ann Rooney, JD, LLM, EdD
President

Margaret Faut Callahan, CRNA, PhD, FNAP, FAAN
Provost, Health Sciences Division

Goutham M. Menon, PhD, Appointed Dean of the School of Social Work

March 15, 2017

Dear Members of the Loyola Community,

We are pleased to announce that Goutham M. Menon, PhD, has accepted our offer to become the dean of the School of Social Work, effective July 1, 2017.

Dr. Menon currently serves as director of the School of Social Work at the University of Nevada, Reno (UNR), where he also holds a faculty appointment as professor of social work. With more than 20 years of academic experience at both the undergraduate and graduate levels, Dr. Menon has taught at The University of Texas at Arlington (1996–98), the University of South Carolina (1998–2005), and The University of Texas at San Antonio (UTSA, 2006–2013). As a practitioner, Dr. Menon served as a case manager at the Schizophrenia Research Foundation in India from 1988–1992. An accomplished scholar, Dr. Menon has authored numerous articles and edited several books. He currently serves on the editorial boards of the Journal of Technology in Human Services, Social Development Issues, Journal of Social Service Research, and Environment and Social Psychology. Since 2014, he has served as co-PI/PI of federal grants totaling more than $2.3 million.

Under his leadership, the School of Social Work at the University of Nevada, Reno has seen substantial enrollment increases at both the undergraduate and graduate levels, as well as the development of an online Master of Social Work program for underserved students in rural Nevada. Dr. Menon also played an integral role in the initial accreditation and subsequent reaffirmation process of the social work program at UTSA. A trained site visitor for program accreditation, Dr. Menon is currently a commissioner for the Commission on Accreditation of the Council on Social Work Education, the accreditation body for schools of social work in the United States. He was recently elected vice president and program chair of the National Association of Deans and Directors of Schools of Social Work.

Dr. Menon received a Doctor of Philosophy in Social Work from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign; a Master of Arts in Social Work from the University of Madras, India; and a Bachelor of Arts in English Language and Literature from Loyola College, an autonomous Jesuit institution of higher education affiliated with the University of Madras. His research interests include the use of information and communication technologies in support of human services and for distance education. Dr. Menon shared with the search committee that the principles for transformative education and the "hungers" highlighted in our University's strategic plan resonate with his vision for current and future faculty, staff, and students within the School of Social Work—especially those who are nontraditional and first-generation and are seeking to lay a sound foundation through an education at a premier university.

We wish to thank the members of the dean search committee and its chair, Patrick Boyle, PhD, vice provost for academic centers and global initiatives, for their work over the past two years. We also want to extend our profound gratitude to Susan Grossman, PhD, who has served as interim dean of the School of Social Work since July 2015. Her leadership, professionalism, and collegiality in service to the school and the University deserve special mention.

Please join us in thanking Dr. Grossman for her commitment to Loyola and in welcoming Dr. Menon into his new role as dean of the School of Social Work.

Sincerely,

Jo Ann Rooney, JD, LLM, EdD
President

John P. Pelissero, PhD
Provost and Chief Academic Officer

Michael J. Kaufman, JD, Appointed Dean of the School of Law

March 13, 2017

Dear Members of the Loyola Community,

We are pleased to announce that Michael J. Kaufman, JD, has been appointed as the dean of the School of Law. His appointment is effective today, March 13, 2017.

Professor Kaufman has been a member of the Loyola law faculty since 1986 and served as the School of Law's associate dean for academic affairs from 2005 until July 2016, when he assumed the role of interim dean. He has devoted his entire professional life to the service of others and is renowned for his efforts to create greater educational diversity and equity at all levels of learning.

An accomplished scholar and prolific author, Professor Kaufman has published dozens of books and countless law review articles in his four areas of expertise: education law and policy, securities regulation and litigation, civil procedure, and jurisprudence. His casebook, Education Law, Policy, and Practice: Cases and Materials, is one of the leading texts in both law and graduate school classes devoted to education law and policy. While serving as associate dean, he also created two Loyola School of Law institutes—the Education Law and Policy Institute and the Institute for Investor Protection—both of which he still directs. He was also the architect of the school's highly successful new Weekend JD program and has published the most widely used treatise in Illinois civil litigation, Illinois Civil Trial Procedure, now in its 16th edition.

In his leadership roles, Professor Kaufman has consistently served as an advocate for our Jesuit, Catholic mission, particularly in the professional schools. He was selected to serve on the steering committee for our current strategic plan, "Plan 2020: Building a More Just, Humane, and Sustainable World." As part of the committee, he participated in the development and drafting of all aspects of the plan, including its mission statement, shared goals, and institutional priorities. An expert consultant to federal and state regulators, and a public arbitrator for securities disputes, Professor Kaufman delivers bar examination review lectures for thousands of law students across the country each year. He has also been elected to three terms on the board of education of a large, diverse school district in the Chicago area, serving as the board's president and vice president.

Professor Kaufman received a Juris Doctor from the University of Michigan Law School and a Bachelor of Arts in political science and English literature from Kenyon College. He is a member of Phi Beta Kappa.

We could not be more pleased that our national search for an extraordinary dean to lead the School of Law has resulted in the appointment of Professor Kaufman. We are confident that his unwavering commitment to excellence, innovation, social justice, and the abiding values of our law school and University will allow our community to flourish in new and exciting ways. We extend our thanks to the members of the dean search committee and its chair, Barry Sullivan, JD, professor in the School of Law and Cooney and Conway Chair in Advocacy, for their work this academic year in filling this important position.

Please join us in congratulating—and thanking—Professor Kaufman as he transitions into his new role as dean of the School of Law.

Sincerely,

Jo Ann Rooney, JD, LLM, EdD
President

John P. Pelissero, PhD
Provost and Chief Academic Officer

Damon W. Cates, EdD, Appointed Senior Vice President for Advancement

March 9, 2017

Dear Members of the Loyola Community,

I am pleased to announce that Damon W. Cates, EdD, has been appointed senior vice president for advancement. On May 1, Damon will join Loyola from his current role as the senior associate vice president and campaign director, alumni relations and development, at The University of Chicago.

In that position, Damon leads the university's comprehensive, multi-billion-dollar campaign, which launched as one of the largest in U.S. higher education history and has raised over $3.6 billion to date. The UChicago Campaign was also the first to launch with a publicly stated alumni engagement goal of getting more than 125,000 of the university's 160,000-plus alumni to go, give, and/or help during the campaign's public phase. To date, more than 100,000 alumni have participated. Relatedly, Damon has also helped drive an increase in undergraduate alumni giving from 33 percent to 42 percent over the past six years.

Damon has an impressive track record of success in fundraising leadership. Prior to his current role, he served as executive director of the Penn Fund at the University of Pennsylvania and director of the Stanford Fund at Stanford University. He has also held several other leadership roles in annual giving and development at The University of Chicago. His degrees include a Doctor of Education from the University of Pennsylvania, a Master of Business Administration from The University of Chicago, and a Bachelor of Arts from Millikin University. Damon possesses not only the professional skills and experience but also the personal characteristics to lead and grow our community of engaged alumni, donors, and friends of the University.

As the senior vice president for advancement at Loyola, Damon will lead the Advancement Division including all development and fundraising efforts, alumni relations, and special events. To do this, Damon will work closely with key University leaders including the provosts, deans, faculty, staff, fellow senior leaders, and members of the Board of Trustees.

As I have stated in communications with the community over the last few months, Loyola is moving to a multi-year financial planning model and will build on the foundation of a sustainable financial and operating plan to address our challenges. Damon and the entire Advancement Division will be critical in helping the University achieve our strategic goals in the years to come through increased fundraising success and endowment growth.

I would like to express my sincere gratitude to Jamie Orsini, who has served as interim vice president for advancement since April 2016 and will continue leading the Advancement Division until Damon joins us. At that time, Jamie will resume her role as associate vice president for advancement.

Please join me in welcoming Damon to the Loyola community.

Sincerely,

Jo Ann Rooney, JD, LLM, EdD
President

Guidelines and Contacts for Our Community

March 3, 2017

Dear Members of the Loyola Community,

As you know, Loyola’s longstanding commitment to undocumented students on all our campuses is unwavering. I am writing to share information regarding this commitment; to detail certain University guidelines regarding subpoenas, warrants, or other requests for information; and to apprise you of how we will coordinate on behalf of our Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) students moving forward.

The University has taken a leadership role in supporting undocumented students for several years, and we have garnered national attention for our support of DACA students in the Stritch School of Medicine. Our commitment to students regardless of race, ethnicity, religion, or immigration status is central to our Jesuit, Catholic mission. This includes upholding the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) to protect the privacy of student education records and partnering with Campus Safety to preserve the personal safety and dignity of all Loyola students, faculty, and staff. We will continue to work across University departments and with our local, state, and federal allies to support and advocate for DACA students to the fullest extent of the law.

We are closely monitoring the DACA issue and related executive orders. This is a dynamic situation with wide-ranging implications for our institution, our students, and students at higher education institutions across the United States. We are working closely with our higher education partners and coalitions, including the Association of Catholic Colleges and Universities, the Association of Jesuit Colleges and Universities, and the American Council on Education, to strategically leverage our resources and maximize our efforts on behalf of our students.

I want to make sure that all members of our community are informed of certain University guidelines regarding subpoenas, warrants, or other requests for information. If a subpoena relates in any way to undocumented students at Loyola, including but not limited to DACA students, or an immigration enforcement action, you must immediately notify the Office of the General Counsel at 312.915.6200. This includes, but is not limited to, subpoenas related to education records of undocumented students, information regarding Loyola’s policies or procedures pertaining to undocumented students, and/or criminal investigations or other law enforcement activities related to undocumented students at Loyola.

Additionally, please be advised that if you are served with a warrant of any kind, the only action you should take is to politely ask the law enforcement officials serving the warrant (e.g. U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE), FBI, IRS, Chicago Police Department) to wait in the office while you immediately contact Thomas K. Murray, chief of police and director of Campus Safety, at 773.508.6039 and Katherine Kenny, assistant general counsel, in the Office of the General Counsel at 312.915.6200 for instructions. Our University guidelines stipulate that faculty, staff, administrators, and students do not otherwise engage with the law enforcement officials.

I have charged K.C. Mmeje, EdD, assistant vice president and dean of students in the Division of Student Development, to serve as the point of contact for all DACA-related information, issues, and concerns. He will coordinate with colleagues on the Health Sciences Campus as well as with Arrupe College on all DACA-related issues. Please contact the Office of the Dean of Students directly at 773.508.8840 so that we can ensure timely and effective communication and collaboration on behalf of all our DACA students at Loyola.

Thank you for your continued commitment to our students and our mission.

Sincerely,

Jo Ann Rooney, JD, LLM, EdD
President

Financial Planning Working Groups

February 23, 2017

Dear Members of the Loyola Community,

In the months following my November inauguration address, I have spoken about the critical issues facing higher education today—rising expenses, escalating tuitions, student loan debt, and the general value proposition of higher education. In addition, state and federal budget uncertainty—including MAP grants that close to 2,400 Loyola students rely on—creates added pressure on families and the University budget. All of these tensions continue to fuel the arguments of those who question whether a college education is worth the financial investment and truly prepares our students to be productive and engaged members of our society.

At Loyola, we know that we cannot continue to rely on raising tuition rates as the principal source of funding our increases in expenses. We have a responsibility to ensure that as many students as possible have access to a transformative education. So, we must ask ourselves how we can balance the requirement of careful fiscal stewardship with our institutional mission.

Over the past eight years, our expenses have continued to increase at a faster rate than revenue. Continuing on the current trajectory without making significant changes will result in our expenses exceeding our revenue in the next few years.

The good news is that Loyola is fiscally healthy, but we must do some critical work now to ensure that it remains so. We have built the foundation of a sustainable financial and operating plan to address our challenges—both in the short term and the longer term—by moving to a three-year strategic budgeting process. Now is the time to secure our future by closely reviewing our finances and operations and developing specific action plans for diversifying and growing our revenue through innovative academic programming, enhanced research activities, increased fundraising success, and endowment growth.

During the fall semester, we took the first steps toward a comprehensive review of our operational and fiscal priorities to ensure alignment with our mission, strategic plan, and desired, measurable outcomes across the University. The strategic planning undertaken for “Plan 2020: Building a More Just, Humane, and Sustainable World” continues to drive our work and investment. The Plan 2020 structure is working well, and we will be following a similar model as we roll out this new financial planning initiative.

This month, we established five University-wide working groups to advise the Budget Review Team, composed of senior administrative leaders, on future directions for strategic financial and operations planning. The five groups include faculty and staff representatives, as well as administrative leaders, to collectively assess our current state of operations. The teams will focus on five areas across our University: Academics, Student Development and Academic Services, Human Resources and Benefits, Capital Assets and Facilities, and Operational Processes.

The primary focus for these groups is to study how our academic and business operations support the University mission; advance our current strategic plan; stimulate innovation; and spur revenue enhancement and cost containment to improve the results of operations. The groups have been charged with studying current operations and assessing opportunities for change that could be implemented over a multi-year period. Before or by December 2017, each group will provide recommendations for further consideration.

The goal of moving to multi-year financial planning and modeling is to produce three-year rolling budgets—clearly tying our outcome metrics with our resource allocation and prioritization over a multi-year period.

Again, I want to reassure you that we are a fiscally healthy and sound institution. Because of that position, we are able to both plan for the future and have the flexibility required to modify our business model. This is all about preparing for a future where adaptability and change leadership is imperative.

As progress is made, we will provide regular updates. In the meantime, please find information on the financial planning working groups, including a list of each group’s members, here.

Sincerely,

Jo Ann Rooney, JD, LLM, EdD
President

Response to Dreamer Committee’s annual report

February 22, 2017

Dear Dreamer Committee,

We want to thank each of you for the thorough report you submitted in December. We have had the opportunity to review, discuss, and thoughtfully reflect upon the various elements of the report. It was also shared with the Council of Deans, whose feedback was carefully considered as we developed this response.

MORE ONLINE
Click here to read the full Dreamer Committee report.
Click here for a list of resources available on campus and throughout the community.  

Your report does an excellent job of showcasing the comprehensive commitment that Loyola University Chicago has made to undocumented students throughout the years. The University has taken a leadership role in supporting undocumented students for several years, and as you know, we have garnered national attention for our support of DACA students in the Stritch School of Medicine. Much of the progress we have made advocating for and supporting undocumented undergraduate and graduate students is due to the passionate commitment and hard work of the Dreamer Committee members and all those in our community who recognize the centrality of this commitment to our Jesuit, Catholic mission. 

We are closely monitoring the DACA issue and related executive orders. This is an extraordinarily dynamic situation with wide-ranging implications for our institution and most especially for our students. In partnership with sister institutions, Loyola has committed that we will continue to protect, to the fullest extent of the law, undocumented students on our campuses and strongly promote retention of the DACA program. Last month, both the Association of Jesuit Colleges and Universities (AJCU) and the Association of Catholic Colleges and Universities (ACCU) met to discuss a number of critical issues, including the status of DACA and the executive order establishing the travel ban. 

In Washington, DC, Philip Hale, vice president for government affairs, and Dr. Rooney convened meetings with Senators Dick Durbin and Tammy Duckworth, as well as congressional leaders on both sides of the aisle, to advocate on behalf of our students. We support the bipartisan BRIDGE Act, a legislative solution to protect DACA students. It is clear that by working together with our higher education partners and coalitions, we can strategically leverage our resources and maximize our efforts on behalf of our students. In addition to our University statements of support, the public statements that we have signed onto with the ACCU, AJCU, American Council on Education, and Pomona College reflect that shared and ongoing commitment.

Your report recommends that Loyola adopt the term “sanctuary university” as a way to send a “strong message of solidarity and support.” Since the presidential election, the term “sanctuary” has been appropriated for factional purposes without any clear or uniform definition regarding what that term implies and the commitment it entails for institutions who have adopted it. We are, as you know, actively engaged in advocating for our students and ensuring the protection and dignity of all the members of our community. After much reflection and discussion, we feel strongly that taking these affirmative actions is much more impactful and articulates our commitment more clearly than adopting a generic term that can be divisive and, in some cases, inflammatory and partisan. Loyola’s message and actions of solidarity and support will continue to advocate for and support undocumented students in a public way, however, we will not adopt the designation “sanctuary university.”

The University is also aggressively moving on a number of fronts to support our students and to anticipate future executive orders that may impact Loyola and all institutions of higher education. These concurrent, multifaceted efforts detailed below demonstrate our commitment to our undocumented students and to our mission. They align with a number of your recommendations, and we agree that there are several next steps to advance our collective effort.

Partnerships—In addition to our active work with the AJCU and the ACCU, several partnerships have been established. We are working with ENVOY on communications around legal rights for DACA students and recently held a workshop, “Know Your Rights.” The Health Sciences Division has been working with The Resurrection Project and Trinity Health. We are seeking additional partnerships and know your committee members will have ideas and contacts to consider. 

Financial Support—The University will continue to support undocumented students with scholarship opportunities and loan support, and we continue to investigate funding streams to assist us with this task. Some of the current support we provide include:

  • Full scholarships will continue to be awarded to five new students for their baccalaureate experience. We will move this program forward to ensure that recipients can focus on their education during their time at Loyola.
  • The School of Law will offer scholarships to fund five law students, as the state now allows DACA students to sit for the Bar Exam.
  • Health Sciences will continue its work with lenders to provide loans to current Stritch School of Medicine students.
  • More than 60 Arrupe DACA students are receiving scholarships.
  • A generous gift from an anonymous alumni couple will provide support toward tuition, room, board, mentoring, and other programming for talented students who complete their associate’s degree at Arrupe College and are accepted into a bachelor’s degree program at Loyola University Chicago.
  • Stephen Katsouros, S.J., Arrupe College dean and executive director, is identifying educational and financial partnerships to support students throughout their collegiate experiences. There are ongoing conversations with other colleges and universities that are eager to create a pathway toward a bachelor’s degree for Arrupe students.
  • The student fee-funded Magis scholarship of $50,000, with a match gift, was approved in 2015. The first new students to benefit from the generosity of other students will begin their studies in the 2017–2018 academic year. 

We also remain committed, along with all higher education institutions, to upholding the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) to protect the privacy of student education records. More information on the University’s FERPA policy, which contains information regarding a student’s rights under FERPA, is available at LUC.edu/ferpa.

Finally, Campus Safety remains committed to preserving the personal safety and dignity of every person in our University community, without concern for any individual’s heritage, ethnicity, religion, or immigration status. The International Association of Campus Law Enforcement Administrators (IACLEA), of which we are a member, will continue to monitor changes in U.S. immigration policy and our Campus Safety administrators will work closely with IACLEA, the Chicago Police Department, and other law enforcement agencies to protect all our students to the fullest extent of the law. 

While this letter is in specific response to the committee’s report, we would like to reiterate our ongoing commitment to actively monitor the rapidly evolving DACA and immigration situation in the U.S. We are pleased that recent memoranda from the Department of Homeland Security do not impact current DACA students and their status. We will continue to communicate with the University community and, if necessary, adapt the University’s approach in the context of our mission and in alignment with the Archdiocese of Chicago who, like us, is committed to protecting immigrant women and men to the fullest extent of the law. 

Again, thank you for preparing this annual report. We will post this response on the Office of the President website, along with a link to your annual report, which we will also post on the Diversity and Inclusion website.

Your passion and commitment to advancing the promise of a just society, rooted in our Jesuit, Catholic mission, is making a transformative impact on Loyola and all our students. 

Sincerely,

Jo Ann Rooney, JD, LLM, EdD
President

John P. Pelissero, PhD
Provost and Chief Academic Officer

Margaret Faut Callahan, CRNA, PhD, FNAP, FAAN
Provost, Health Sciences Division

Michael F. Andrews, PhD, Appointed Director of the John Felice Rome Center

February 14, 2017

Dear Loyola Faculty and Staff,

We are pleased to announce that Michael F. Andrews, PhD, has been appointed to serve as the next director of the John Felice Rome Center.

Dr. Andrews joins us from the University of Portland, where he is dean of the College of Arts and Sciences as well as professor of philosophy, director of the Catholic Studies program, and McNerney-Hanson Endowed Chair in Ethics.

The search committee was immediately impressed with Dr. Andrews’s deep understanding of our University’s mission and the value of Jesuit higher education. He attended Georgetown University for his undergraduate studies and taught at two other Jesuit institutions, Fairfield University and later at Seattle University. At the latter, he served in a number of roles, including dean of the Matteo Ricci College, faculty member in the philosophy department, and from 2004–2011, director of the Italy Summer Study Abroad Program, which facilitates experiences for students in Florence and Rome.

Dr. Andrews is also deeply passionate about international study abroad opportunities for students, and his experience abroad spans more than three decades. In addition to his role as director of Seattle University’s Italy Summer Study Abroad Program, he has been a student, faculty coordinator, and researcher in various academic programs across the globe including in Austria, Bosnia, Croatia, Ecuador, Germany, Morocco, Nicaragua, Spain, and Italy.

These qualifications, paired with his extensive and impressive academic background, as well as his deep experience in alumni engagement at several universities, make him uniquely qualified to lead our vibrant campus in Rome.

He holds doctoral and master’s degrees in philosophy from Villanova University; a licentiate of philosophy (PhL) degree from the Pontifical Gregorian University in Rome; a master’s degree in religion from Yale University; and a bachelor’s degree in systematic theology from Georgetown University. Dr. Andrews also earned a certificate in higher education from the Harvard University Graduate School of Education’s Institute for Management and Leadership in Education.

Thank you to Thomas Regan, S.J., dean of the College of Arts and Sciences, and all the search committee members who worked to fill this important role over the past several months. We would also like to acknowledge Patrick Boyle, PhD, interim director of the Rome Center and vice provost, for his continued work in leading our Rome campus until Dr. Andrews joins our community as a member of the Division of Academic Affairs on August 1.

Please help us welcome Dr. Andrews to the Loyola community. We look forward to his strategic leadership in guiding the Rome Center as it begins its next chapter.

Sincerely,

Jo Ann Rooney, JD, LLM, EdD
President

John P. Pelissero, PhD
Provost and Chief Academic Officer

Just Employment Task Force Update

February 9, 2017

Dear Members of the Loyola Community,

In my 2017 Spring Semester Update, I shared our plan to launch a Just Employment Task Force. Today, I am able to provide an update on the initiative now that the membership of the group has been identified and work has commenced—the group’s first meeting took place on Tuesday, February 7.

As a Jesuit, Catholic institution, our mission and current strategic plan require us to seek actionable ways to live out the call to build a more just, humane, and sustainable world. This task force will be doing exactly that. I have asked the group to help identify opportunities for Loyola to demonstrate and deepen its commitment to a more fair, competitive, and socially just workplace. At the end of the semester, they will produce a report and set of recommendations for consideration.

I want to thank Susan Malisch, vice president and CIO for Information Technology Services, for chairing the task force and all of the members—student, faculty, and staff representatives from across our campus community—for agreeing to advance this important work. I look forward to the recommendations and report you will produce in the coming months.

Just Employment Task Force Membership
Chair (President’s Cabinet Member)
Susan Malisch, Vice President and CIO, Information Technology Services

Faculty Representative
Kathleen Maas Weigert, PhD, Sociology

Jesuit Community Representative
James Murphy, S.J., Philosophy

Human Resources Representative
Deborah Meister, Human Resources

Finance Representative
Malcolm Douglas, Financial Services

Marketing and Communication Representative
Steve Christensen, University Marketing and Communication

Faculty Council Representative
Timothy Classen, PhD, Economics

University Staff Council Representative
Kathleen Steinfels, Campus Card Office

Student Government/Student Representative
Hannah Cook and Brock Johnson

University Senate Representative
Niamh McGuigan, University Libraries

Health Sciences Division Representative
Kristin Wojtulewicz, Burn and Shock Trauma Research Institute

To learn more about the Just Employment Task Force, please click here.

Sincerely,

Jo Ann Rooney, JD, LLM, EdD
President

Our Commitment to Diversity

January 30, 2017

Dear Members of the Loyola Community,

The last few weeks have highlighted numerous fault lines in our nation as a consequence of a divisive presidential election. The recent actions and executive orders of the new presidential administration are unprecedented and have left many outraged, confused, and fearful of their safety and future. I want to reinforce that we are a community made stronger because of our diversity. All are equally valued, regardless of faith tradition, national origin, or immigration status. Secure in our Jesuit, Catholic identity, we understand and appreciate Loyola University Chicago as a home for all faiths, and the best traditions of our faith call upon us to welcome every person as a reflection of God.

Xenophobia or other forms of discrimination can have no place at Loyola or our larger community. We cannot allow fear, anger, or impulsiveness to diminish our embrace of the free pursuit of knowledge in order to build a just society. Please be assured of our unwavering commitment to diversity on our campuses. This commitment requires us to dialogue with each other, demonstrating that we do not fear but rather embrace and learn from people different than us. We treasure diverse cultures and faith traditions precisely because they encourage us to explore and understand the variety in the universe, as well as value and understand our own histories on a deeper level.

I want you to know that the University continues to advocate on a multitude of fronts, including local, regional, and national levels. Our focus is on ensuring the protection and dignity of all of the members of our community and society. For those feeling frightened or vulnerable in light of recent events, I hope to offer some solace as you do not stand alone in facing the future. Loyola University Chicago stands with you in solidarity and with moral clarity. We will never stop advocating to fashion a peaceful and just society that our faith calls us to build.

Sincerely,

Jo Ann Rooney, JD, LLM, EdD
President

Tuition Information for Academic Year 2017-18

January 26, 2017

Dear Students,

Thank you for making Loyola University Chicago your academic home. I know that you have options as to where you spend your collegiate careers, and I am pleased you have chosen to take part in the Loyola Experience. Today, I would like to share information regarding tuition and fees for the 2017–2018 academic year and provide an update on our financial health.

To invest in our academic programs and strategic priorities (e.g. environmental sustainability, solutions to health disparities, and enhancements in student support to improve both retention and graduation rates), provide significant financial aid, and offer our faculty and staff a small cost-of-living salary increase, a 2.5 percent increase has been approved by the Board of Trustees for undergraduate tuition in 2017–2018. Room rates will increase by an average of 2.5 percent, and full-time student development fees will rise by 1.9 percent. These rates will go into effect for the fall 2017 semester. Additional information can be found at LUC.edu/bursar and LUC.edu/reslife.

As I stated in my inauguration address last November, we cannot—and I assure you we will not—continue to rely on raising tuition rates and fees as the principal source of funding our growing expenses. In fact, this tuition increase is significantly less than past years, and we pledge to minimize tuition growth moving forward. This strategic priority will advance our efforts to create more accessibility and affordability for students.

Throughout higher education, tension over affordability is creating an environment where all of us are being faced with making difficult choices and decisions. The expenses of running our University continue to rise at a faster rate than our revenues, scholarship needs to support student access have grown, and the uncertainty of funding from the state and federal levels continues to require us to rethink our budgeting approach. Our imperatives are to ensure that as many students as possible have access to a transformative education and that we fulfill our mission of service to others.

Please know that our principal focus is on the mission and continuing to enhance the level of excellent education and financial stewardship that everyone expects. All of us in University leadership will work together to reduce tuition increases, enhance scholarship aid, and think innovatively about our future. We are confident that this approach will allow us to meet our established goals and provide you with the educational and transformational experiences that you deserve.

Sincerely,

Jo Ann Rooney, JD, LLM, EdD
President

2017 Spring Semester Update

January 18, 2017

Dear Loyola Community,

Happy New Year. I hope that you enjoyed a wonderful Christmas and holiday break. I would like to share some updates about important initiatives that are being advanced as we begin the spring semester.

This month, we are launching a Just Employment Task Force, composed of faculty, staff, and student representatives. This task force is being asked to help identify opportunities for Loyola to demonstrate and deepen its commitment to a more fair, competitive, and socially just workplace. The task force is charged with preparing a report with recommendations on how we might advance our commitment to social justice in the workplace. The work of the task force, which will be completed by May, aligns well with our Plan 2020 strategic plan as we seek to shape a better University—and through that—a better future for Loyola and beyond. Updates from this group’s work will be available in the coming weeks.

Additionally, the Department of Human Resources has partnered with Workplace Answers to conduct online Harassment Prevention Training for all staff and full-time faculty members at the University. As you know, violence of any kind is not tolerated at Loyola, and your safety and security remain a top priority. This compulsory training is one of a number of ways we are working to ensure that faculty and staff are aware of and actively working to prevent harassment of any kind. We are also launching a campus-wide survey focused on gender-based misconduct this semester. Spearheaded by our Title IX team, this survey will allow us to better understand the current campus climate. I ask that you take the time to participate when the survey launches this semester as your input is critically important. The results will help identify current concerns and help us determine next steps to better align our educational and prevention efforts with campus needs.

As we make progress on a number of different and important initiatives, we continue to work diligently and strategically to steward our resources and plan for the future. During my inaugural address, I indicated that a transparent and inclusive budget process would support our efforts to refocus our attention on developing our external fundraising and advancement capabilities and look for opportunities to enhance research and diversify revenue while also embracing innovation to foster growth. We are very fortunate to be in a solid financial position at this time, enabling us to meet the current issues facing institutions of higher education. At the same time, for the benefit of our entire University community, we must begin to make proactive adjustments to our strategy, including moving to a three-year budget process, to maintain our position of strength for anticipated future challenges and opportunities.

Over the course of the semester, Loyola faculty, staff, and students will be invited to lectures and activities that offer us the opportunity to participate in dialogue and discussion with one another in order to promote engaged citizenship. This effort underscores many of our institutional strategic goals as articulated in Plan 2020. This Thursday evening, January 19, an ecumenical prayer service will be held at Madonna della Strada Chapel in solidarity with this month’s “World Day of Migrants and Refugees.” A similar prayer service will take place at the Health Sciences Campus in the afternoon. Also this month, we will celebrate the legacy of Martin Luther King Jr. at annual events across our Chicagoland campuses. Other opportunities related to increasing our civic engagement and promoting civil discourse in order to take on difficult societal issues facing our city and our world are being planned and will be shared soon.

I look forward to working with you to meet—in fact, to exceed—the high expectations we have for ourselves for the benefit of our community and our world.

Sincerely,

Jo Ann Rooney, JD, LLM, EdD
President

Harassment Prevention Training

January 3, 2017

Dear Colleagues,

Loyola University Chicago is committed to building and preserving a welcoming and inclusive community where everyone can work together, free from all forms of exploitation, intimidation, and harassment, including sexual harassment. Our Jesuit, Catholic mission and our commitment to upholding the dignity of every person compels us to actively foster a community that values and respects one another.

As you know, Loyola does not tolerate any form of harassment—such behavior is prohibited by law and by University policy. Ongoing education is one important way that Human Resources works to advance and sustain a positive, healthy, and inclusive environment for our mutual benefit and safety. In the coming week, full-time faculty as well as full-time and part-time staff members will be provided with information to access the online, interactive Harassment Prevention Training. This compulsory training is designed to increase awareness and to promote the prevention of any and all forms of harassment on our campuses.

Completion of this compliance training is required and is central to our efforts to ensure that all faculty and staff have the opportunity to work in a safe, respectful, and inclusive campus community. Loyola is committed to practicing responsible engagement activities, including understanding the duty to report harassment concerns that you may have.

Thank you in advance for completing this compulsory training by February 7. If you have any questions regarding this initiative, please contact Human Resources at 312.915.6175 or visit LUC.edu/hr.

Sincerely,

Jo Ann Rooney, JD, LLM, EdD
President

Addressing an Off-Campus Gender-Based Violent Crime

December 16, 2016

Loyola Community,

In the past few days, Loyolans have expressed concern following media reports related to a student-athlete who was charged and pled guilty to a gender-based violent crime that occurred in his home state of Georgia. This crime occurred prior to the individual joining Loyola. To our knowledge, we neither received information about the crime, nor had any awareness that it occurred until Monday, December 12, when we received a media inquiry. Based on media reports, the individual is in police custody in Georgia. The individual is not registered for classes in the Spring Semester.

Violence of any kind is not tolerated at Loyola, and the safety and security of all members of our campus community remain a top priority. Through the work of the Coordinated Community Response Team (CCRT), we continue to educate, provide access to services, and ensure that our campus community is a safe and supportive environment for survivors. Our Department of Athletics also continues to provide mandatory Title IX training to its coaches, staff, and student-athletes, amongst other efforts to ensure our Community Standards are followed.

We understand this recent news has been difficult for many of you. We stand in solidarity with all survivors and want to remind you that students seeking resources related to gender-based violence can contact the Wellness Center at 773.508.2530 or visit the CCRT website. As always, faculty and staff in need of resources are encouraged to utilize the University’s Employee Assistance Program.

We also ask each of you to report any incidents of gender-based violence that you are aware of. Reports can be made via the EthicsLine Reporting Hotline website or by calling 855.603.6988, which is available 24 hours a day, seven days a week. Submitted notifications will be handled as promptly and discreetly as possible, with facts made available only to those who need to investigate and resolve the matter.

Our focus is your safety and well-being, and please know that we continuously look for new and additional ways to stem gender-based violence and to protect and empower those who report it.

Sincerely,

Thomas M. Kelly
Title IX Coordinator
Senior Vice President for Administrative Services

A Christmas Message from Dr. Rooney

December 14, 2016

Dear Members of the Loyola Community,

During this third week of Advent, we are invited to pause and reflect on the many blessings of this past year. We remember in a special way the poor and marginalized members of our society, and we recommit ourselves to the work of building a more peaceful world by using our gifts in service to humanity and all of God’s creation.

We will continue to work tirelessly to ensure that Loyola is a warm, welcoming, safe, and supportive community for all who study, teach, and work here. As I shared earlier this month, Loyola and our partner AJCU schools made a strong, public statement reaffirming our commitment to protect and support undocumented students. We have been a national leader in embracing and supporting DACA students in our Stritch School of Medicine and throughout our undergraduate and graduate programs. Our continued support of these students, who are vital members of our University community, will not waver, and we will continue to create and promote opportunities to advocate on behalf of all of our students. We strive to be a welcoming home for a wide diversity of students, faculty, and staff on our campuses and we celebrate the diversity which unifies and strengthens us. The AJCU statement further underscores our shared mission and values that are at the heart of our Jesuit, Catholic tradition. It is who we are and will continue to be as a University community.

It should be helpful to keep in mind the guidance from St. Ignatius as we continue to participate in discussions on a variety of topics. Although many conversations can be difficult, and elicit strong emotions and varying opinions, we are called upon to engage each other in thoughtful dialogue and debate and to come together in a spirit of good will. Our shared University spirit of good will was especially manifest this month as over 60 University departments as well as the Jesuit Community contributed much-needed items for 62 families in Chicagoland. Thank you for your generous support of the Loyola Gives program this year, and in a special way, thank you to all the program coordinators, shoppers, and gift wrappers for helping us bring some Christmas cheer to area families through this partnership with Catholic Charities.

I extend a heartfelt wish to you and your families for a blessed holiday season and a hope-filled New Year.

Merry Christmas and Happy Holidays,

Jo Ann Rooney, JD, LLM, EdD
President

Christmas Holiday and Invitation to the University Christmas Reception

December 6, 2016

Loyola Community,

It is our pleasure to invite you to the annual University Christmas Reception. We’ll celebrate on Wednesday, December 21, from 2 to 4 p.m. in the Damen Student Center on our Lake Shore Campus.

At the reception, enjoy food and drink while you mingle with fellow Loyolans under the University’s giant Christmas tree. We’ll also have a holiday-themed photo booth as well as visits from strolling carolers, magicians, and Santa Claus. Good luck to all during the annual raffle giveaway.

In this season of celebration, a time dedicated to friends and family as well as relaxation and reflection, the University will be closed the entire week following Christmas, December 26-30. This gift of additional holiday time acknowledges our commitment to the well-being of our faculty and staff, fostering work-life balance, and our ongoing University-wide environmental sustainability efforts. In keeping with our mission, we want you to enjoy the three extra days, December 27-29, with pay to rejuvenate and plan for what will be an exciting and focused new year ahead.

A small number of staff will be needed on campus to provide primary support throughout this holiday period. We appreciate their efforts toward ensuring the safety and continued operation of our University during this time. Department managers will reach out shortly to staff needed with details regarding work scheduling. In the meantime, please visit the Human Resources website for additional information regarding timecard coding and the use of comparable time off after the holidays for staff who work during this period.

Christmas Reception Details
Spirit Contest: The University Staff Council will host its annual holiday spirit contest. You can learn more about details, including how to register, here.

Getting to Campus: For those driving, courtesy parking will be available in the Main Parking Structure on campus. For those not driving, complimentary round-trip shuttle service will be provided for colleagues at the Water Tower and Health Sciences campuses. Anyone planning to utilize the shuttle service should RSVP no later than noon on Friday, December 16, here. Your responses will ensure that we can accommodate everyone.

  • Water Tower Campus—Shuttle service will depart from the Corboy Law Center at 1:30 p.m. Shuttles will leave the Lake Shore Campus to return to the Water Tower Campus at 4:15 p.m.
  • Health Sciences Campus—Shuttle service will depart from Fifth Avenue, just west of the Niehoff School of Nursing, at 1 p.m. Shuttles will leave the Lake Shore Campus to return to the Health Sciences Campus at 4:15 p.m.

Please call Human Resources at 773.508.3140 with any questions. We look forward to celebrating the Christmas season with you.

Sincerely,

Jo Ann Rooney, JD, LLM, EdD
President

Winifred Williams, PhD
Vice President for Human Resources
Chief Diversity and Inclusion Officer

Statements of Support

December 1, 2016

Dear Loyola Community,

On Wednesday, a statement of support was published by the presidents of the Association of Jesuit Colleges and Universities (AJCU) to reaffirm our commitment to undocumented students on our campuses and our unwavering support for all students, faculty, and staff, regardless of their faith traditions. This statement reflects the shared mission and values that are central to our Jesuit, Catholic tradition. 

On behalf of the University, I also signed on to a statement of support initiated by Pomona College, which now has more than 400 signatures.

I encourage you to read both statements and thank you for your continued support and contributions to our mission.

Sincerely,

Jo Ann Rooney, JD, LLM, EdD
President

Happy Thanksgiving

November 22, 2016

Dear Loyola Community,

As we gather this week with family and friends, I would like to encourage each of us to take a moment to be thankful for the many gifts that we have received and that we share as a community—access to a world-class city rich with cultural and economic resources; opportunities to learn and study through respectful dialogue in and outside the classroom; and creative faculty, staff, students, and alumni who go to the periphery to affect positive change in our city and our world. We are all the beneficiaries of Loyola’s Jesuit, Catholic heritage and, working together, we will be able to realize our Plan 2020 goal of building a more just, humane, and sustainable world.

This month, as part of Ignatian Heritage Month, we collected more than 1,200 food items which will be distributed to food pantries and families across the Chicagoland area. We also packaged nearly 22,000 meals during the November 5 day of service with Stop Hunger Now, an international hunger relief organization. Thank you to everyone who participated in Service Day and whose generosity will mean so much to families in need this Thanksgiving.

We have the opportunity again this year to participate as a University community in the Loyola Gives program. This annual collaboration with Catholic Charities supports Chicago-area families by providing them with winter essentials, including coats and boots, as well as Christmas gifts for children. This year we’ve committed to assist more than 60 families in Chicagoland. I hope you will join me in participating in Loyola Gives.

Thank you for your continued generosity to all in need. I wish you and yours a very happy Thanksgiving.

Sincerely,

Jo Ann Rooney, JD, LLM, EdD
President

Coming Together as a University Community

November 10, 2016

Dear Loyolans,

Last Friday, we gathered as a University community on our Lake Shore Campus to celebrate our outstanding President’s Medallion students and to invest me as the 24th president of Loyola. It was a terrific celebration of Loyola and of our shared commitment to our uniquely Ignatian mission.

In the wake of this week’s U.S. presidential election, emotions are running high in our city and country. In my remarks last week, I asked if we were willing to reach deep within ourselves, risk discomfort, confront ambiguities, and increase our civic engagement in order to take on the difficult societal issues facing us and our communities. I challenged us to do so, because that is who we are as a community firmly grounded in our Jesuit, Catholic heritage and mission.

Today, and in the days ahead, we have the opportunity, once again, to model civil discourse and respectful dialogue, and to recommit ourselves to Cura Personalis, caring for one another and respecting the dignity of all our fellow Loyolans and neighbors for the benefit of our University and our world.

Sincerely,

Jo Ann Rooney, JD, LLM, EdD
President

Celebrate Ignatian Heritage Month

October 28, 2016

Dear Loyola Community,

I am writing to invite you to join me in celebrating Ignatian Heritage Month in November. This month of programming provides an opportunity to reflect on and celebrate our rich Jesuit, Catholic heritage as well as to remember those who have struggled for social justice before us and to continue their important work to create a more just, humane, and sustainable world.

Ignatian Heritage Month, organized by Mission and Identity, includes a range of dialogues, lectures, and events—including Hunger Week, a tradition at Loyola for more than 40 years. One of the events in early November is a University-sponsored food drive for local food pantries and families near our three Chicago-area campuses. All Loyolans are invited to participate in this canned food drive. Information on drop-off locations and dates can be found here, and the full calendar of Ignatian Heritage Month programming can be found here. I encourage you to engage in as many of the activities as your schedule allows.

I would also like to highlight and encourage you to attend the presentation of the 2016 Martyrs Award, which is given annually in conjunction with Ignatian Heritage Month. The award is presented to a worthy faith-based organization in support of our shared commitment to advancing social justice and in remembrance of the Universidad Centroamericana martyrs. I am delighted to announce that the Comisión Intereclesial de Justicia y Paz (JyP), a Colombian-based organization that works to enhance the rule of law and democracy in Colombia by working on behalf of people who have experienced a violation of their human rights, will be honored with the prestigious award this year.

On November 16, Father Jesús Alberto Franco Giraldo, executive director of JyP, will accept this award and join us for a panel discussion on the promotion of peace in Colombia and around the world. The Martyrs Mass and reception will immediately follow this program. I hope you will join me to celebrate this organization’s work. You can read more about JyP and the Martyrs Award here.

I look forward to seeing you at Ignatian Heritage Month events in November.

Sincerely,

Jo Ann Rooney, JD, LLM, EdD
President

New Superior General Elected

October 14, 2016

Dear Loyola Community,

Earlier this morning, we received the important news that the 36th General Congregation has elected a new Superior General of the Society of Jesus, Father Arturo Sosa Abascal, S.J.

Father Sosa comes from Venezuela and most recently served as the superior of the Interprovincial Houses and Works of the Society of Jesus, a network of international universities and residences in Rome. Our own Thomas Regan, S.J., dean of the College of Arts and Sciences, has known Father Sosa for more than a decade and describes him as a staunch supporter of higher education, a true world citizen, and a passionate promoter of the Society’s social justice initiatives.

As one of the largest Jesuit-sponsored universities in the United States, we will no doubt be influenced by his leadership. I know our community joins me in praying for the further work of the General Congregation and in thanksgiving for the election of our new Superior General.

To learn more about Father Sosa, please read the story posted today on the Loyola homepage. The piece includes comments from James Prehn, S.J., rector of the Jesuit community and vice president and special advisor to the president for mission and identity; Brian Paulson, S.J., provincial of the Chicago-Detroit Province; Mark Bosco, S.J., associate professor of English and theology and director of the Joan and Bill Hank Center for the Catholic Intellectual Heritage; and Father Regan.

Sincerely,

Jo Ann Rooney, JD, LLM, EdD
President

Organizational Announcement

September 22, 2016

Dear Loyola Community,

As I continue assimilating to Loyola University Chicago and learn more about our great University each day, I would like to announce some leadership and organizational changes to the Loyola community.

The organizational changes outlined in the following message are the result of thoughtful deliberations and discussion with members of our institutional community since my appointment in May. These changes, which are effective immediately, will help ensure that our Jesuit, Catholic mission and our institutional commitment to diversity and inclusion are properly aligned and supported in our organizational structure.

First, I would like to announce the addition of James Prehn, S.J., to my leadership team. Father Prehn serves as the rector of the Jesuit Community at Loyola and is a part-time faculty member at the University. He will join the Office of the President and serve as a member of my Cabinet as vice president and special advisor to the president for mission and identity. In this role as a special advisor, his primary focus will be on matters and strategies related to the administration of the University as they pertain to Loyola’s Jesuit mission, Catholic identity, and relationships with the Archdiocese of Chicago, as well as the Chicago-Detroit Province of the Society of Jesus. Father Prehn will also maintain his full-time role and responsibility as rector of the Jesuit Community, which will inform and benefit the work he does as vice president and special advisor for mission and identity.

Additionally, given the vital role our faculty and staff play in fulfilling our mission and educating our students, and to underscore our commitment to diversity and inclusion across all our campuses and with our community partners, I have asked Winifred L. Williams, PhD, Loyola’s vice president for human resources and chief diversity and inclusion officer, to report directly to me in the Office of the President. Dr. Williams will continue leading human resources strategy and operations, along with championing our diversity and inclusion objectives.

Lastly, I am pleased to announce that Kate Peterson, who currently serves as an executive secretary in Loyola’s Stritch School of Medicine, will join my office as my executive assistant. Kate’s eight years of experience on our Health Sciences Campus, professionalism, and collegiality will be a great asset to me and to our office team.

Please join me in welcoming Father Prehn and Kate Peterson to the Office of the President, and thank you for your continued support of Dr. Williams and our entire institutional leadership team for their service to our academic community.

Sincerely,

Jo Ann Rooney, JD, LLM, EdD
President

Welcome New Students

August 23, 2016

Dear Loyola Community,

I am delighted to have begun my tenure this month as the 24th president of Loyola University Chicago. I have had the opportunity to meet with many Loyolans, including student government leaders, members of the Jesuit community at Loyola, deans, faculty, and staff, along with some external partners. I look forward to continuing to make my way around our beautiful campuses to meet as many people as I can this semester.

This week we prepare for the arrival of more than 2,600 freshman students, the largest incoming class in our history. We also enthusiastically welcome more than 550 transfer students, 1,750 graduate and professional students, and 185 new Arrupe College students. These talented men and women are joining a dynamic university community grounded in our Jesuit, Catholic mission. With the energy of our students and the engagement of all Loyolans, we can direct our passion toward building the more just, humane, and sustainable world that we have committed ourselves to doing with our strategic plan, Plan 2020.

Everyone is cordially invited to participate in the many diverse Welcome Week events scheduled through September 2. I hope that you will join me this Friday afternoon to participate in the annual Convocation Walk and New Student Convocation at the Lake Shore Campus to give our students the same warm Loyola welcome that you have generously given me.

As we begin this new academic year, we are in a strong position to address the challenges that face us and all institutions of higher education and to solidify our position as a leader in driving sustainable change. Building on a legacy of strong leadership, the enduring commitment of our alumni and friends, and our shared passion for transformative education in the Jesuit tradition, we are able to deliver on our promise to prepare people to lead extraordinary lives.

I am proud and humbled to be among the newest Loyolans, and I look forward to our working together to redefine what is truly possible and guide our great institution to new heights.

Sincerely,

Jo Ann Rooney, JD, LLM, EdD
President