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Our Master of Science in Marketing (MSM) degree program integrates creativity with analytics and strategy with insight. You'll have the opportunity to accelerate your career in the dynamic fields of 21st-century marketing.

In keeping with the latest career opportunities in marketing, the MSM degree offers in three tracks:

  • Digital Marketing Analytics
  • Integrated Marketing Communications
  • Supply Chain Management

Many students with undergraduate degrees in journalism, communications, advertising, and marketing have enrolled in the MSM program to advance their careers with additional credentials. Others with degrees in finance, economics, medicine, and engineering have chosen our program as a pathway to career change.

Program Highlights

 
  • Convenient: Courses and schedules can be tailored to accommodate your specific professional ambitions and your work-life commitments.
  • Distinguished faculty: Our faculty are distinguished scholars and successful marketing professionals.
  • Global perspective: Our study abroad programs help you develop the cross-cultural perspective you’ll need to lead in today’s global marketplace
  • Chicago connections: Our partnerships within Chicago’s marketing community will help propel your career.
  • STEM designation: With a national shortage of professionals trained in STEM related fields, employers are actively pursuing STEM degree holders. Two tracks—digital marketing and supply chain—are STEM-designated.
 

What You'll Learn

 

As a Quinlan MSM student, you will:

  • Develop the creative and strategic skills you need to lead and innovate in the diverse, digital, and dynamic field of marketing
  • Learn marketing strategies that deliver brand growth and a competitive advantage in a time of sweeping economic, environmental, and social change
  • Gain the technical business skills that are essential in today’s global economy
  • Learn to ask the questions that are important to humanity as you harness the power of marketing to promote positive social change

You will also build a strong foundation in:

  • Marketing finance
  • Strategic planning
  • Brand leadership
  • Digital and social content development
  • Leadership and ethics
  • Database analytics
  • Sustainable business leadership
  • Global campaign development
 

Careers

 

The demand for marketing professionals with proven skills in marketing strategy and analytics training continues to increase. This growing need translates into many career opportunities for qualified professionals.

The marketing job outlook for Chicago through 2026 is projected to grow 10% faster than the average growth rate for all occupations, according to the U.S. Department of Labor.

Over the last three years, our graduates have been hired by Deloitte, Google, Harley Davidson, Leo Burnett, McDonald's, Ogilvy One, and PepsiCo, among other corporations in the Chicago area, across the nation, and around the world. These graduates work across industry sectors in roles that range from advertising and brand managers to consumer researchers and digital analysts.

MS in Marketing (MSM) graduates are excellent candidates for careers in the following areas:

Digital Marketing Analytics Track

  • Digital Marketing Analyst
  • Data Analyst
  • Marketing Analyst
  • Marketing Research Analyst
  • Email Marketing Specialist
  • SEO Specialist

Integrated Marketing Communication (IMC) Track

  • Director of Marketing and Communications
  • Director of Integrated Communications
  • Brand Manager
  • Digital Marketing Manager
  • Social Media Manager
  • Media Buyer or Planner
  • Strategic Account Planner
  • Corporate Communication Specialist

Supply Chain Track

  • Supply Chain Planner
  • Order Management Specialist
  • Customer Supply Chain Specialist
  • Marketing Data Analyst
  • Market Risk and Operations Analyst
  • Operational Risk Analytics
  • Category Manager
  • Purchasing Manager
  • Logistics Specialist

Because Loyola is a member of the Jesuit network of 27 colleges and universities nationwide, our graduates can receive career services at Quinlan's Business Career Services, as well as at career centers at U.S. Jesuit colleges and universities.

Program Structure

 

Duration: 12-16 Months

Tracks:

  • Digital Marketing Analytics
  • Integrated Marketing Communications
  • Supply Chain

All three tracks have a 12-course curriculum with 3 prerequisite courses. Courses are offered in a 10-week quarter system. You are welcome to begin the program in any quarter.

Classes meet evenings during the week from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m., with some online or on Saturdays. Full-time and part-time students take evening classes online or in our innovative Schreiber Center at the Water Tower Campus located in the heart of Chicago.

Full-time: 3-4 courses each quarter
Part-time: 1-2 courses each quarter

Class Profile

 

A Community of Inspired Peers

A history and fine arts major from New York…a school administrator from Chicago…a finance professional from China…an advertising executive from Brazil.

These are but a few of the professionals you will meet in a Quinlan classroom. Our students bring a broad range of academic and professional experience to the Quinlan School of Business. This diversity creates an engaging and spirited class dynamic and offers many opportunities to collaborate with and learn from a community of inspired peers.

MSM Class Profile, 2018

  • Average class size: 40
  • Average age: 27
  • Internation students: 45%
  • Men: 30%
  • Women: 70% 

Undergraduate Insititutions Represented

  • Johns Hopkins University
  • Columbia University in the City of New York
  • Loyola University Chicago
  • Princeton University
  • Rutgers University
  • Universidad Argentina de la Empresa
  • University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
  • University of Maryland
  • University of Michigan

Curriculum

The Masters in Marketing (MSM) program delivers the strategic, creative curriculum ambitious professionals need to accelerate their careers in today's dynamic marketing communications industry.

As a graduate, you’ll gain the skills to build strong brands, exceed consumer expectations, and address global challenges with thoughtful, actionable innovations that meet the demands of today's marketplace.

Curriculum and Tracks

 

The Masters in Marketing (MSM) program delivers the strategic, creative curriculum ambitious professionals need to accelerate their careers in today's dynamic marketing communications industry.

As a graduate, you’ll gain the skills to build strong brands, exceed consumer expectations, and address global challenges with thoughtful, actionable innovations that meet the demands of today's marketplace.

Three tracks

MSM students choose one of the following three tracks:

  • Digital Marketing Analytics
  • Integrated Marketing Communications
  • Supply Chain

All three tracks have a 12-course curriculum with one prerequisite course.

Full-time and part-time students take evening classes housed in Quinlan's innovative Schreiber Center. Students learn from a world-class faculty and complete a comprehensive marketing curriculum that prepares next generation leaders today. 

Digital Marketing Analytics Track

The Digital Marketing Analytics track is devoted to engaging emerging capabilities built on the foundation of creative, digital, and analytical marketing skill sets.

Combining business goals with marketing decisions, this increasingly critical marketing function leverages consumer, retail, and category trend data to help marketers make informed marketing and business decisions through database models, improved sales forecasting, and data-driven tactics that enhance consumer loyalty, market share, and profitability.

Possible careers paths include digital marketing analyst, data analyst, and marketing analyst.

Track Curriculum

The Digital Marketing Analytics track has a 12-course curriculum with 1 prerequisite course. The curriculum can be completed in 12-16 months.

Prerequisites (1)

ISSCM 402 Quantitative Methods II
In ISSCM 402 – Quantitative Methods II (Statistics Primer), the fundamentals of managerial statistics are presented. Topics include descriptive statistics, probability distributions, normal distribution, central limit theorem, estimation, hypothesis testing, and regression analysis.
The ISSCM 402 Quantitative Methods II course is required of all incoming MSM students and is offered every quarter. 

Marketing Core (6)

ISSCM 402 Quantitative Methods II
In ISSCM 402 – Quantitative Methods II (Statistics Primer), the fundamentals of managerial statistics are presented. Topics include descriptive statistics, probability distributions, normal distribution, central limit theorem, estimation, hypothesis testing, and regression analysis.
The ISSCM 402 Quantitative Methods II course is required of all incoming MSM students and is offered every quarter.

MARK 460: Marketing Mangement
This course develops a broad understanding of the marketing principles that undergird successful marketing strategies and marketing plans with special attention given to international and ethical considerations.
Outcome: Students use and apply marketing principles, strategic research, consumer analysis and target marketing to either a project or to case studies.

MARK 461: Research Methods in Marketing
Prerequisites: MARK 460 and ISSCM 491
This course develops an understanding of the marketing research process and the role of survey research in this process.
Outcome: Students formulate research problems and a design research study, including the development of a questionnaire, selection of an appropriate sample, and data analysis.

MARK 464: Integrated Marketing Communications
Prerequisites: MARK 460; MARK 467 is recommended
This course develops an understanding of how advertising, sales promotion, public relations, personal selling and, in some cases, packaging decisions form a coordinated marketing communications plan.
Outcomes: Students apply the elements of integrated marketing communications and develop a coordinated marketing communications plan for a project or case study.

MARK 465: Global Marketing or Study Abroad
Prerequisite: MARK 460
This course develops an understanding of marketing problems in an international context, with particular attention given to the impact of international factors on consumers, competition, and marketing strategies.
Outcome: Students apply the principles of marketing to solve marketing problems in an international context. Students analyze cases and identify optimal solutions to international marketing problems.

MARK 467: Consumer Behavior and Insights
Prerequisite: MARK 460 (and recommended prior to MARK 464)
This course develops an understanding of consumer behavior before, during, and after the consumption process by exploring both the micro-level mental processes that have an impact on consumer decision-making, as well as macro-level cultural and social influences on consumer behavior.
Outcomes: Students apply course concepts and theories to develop a consumer analysis and marketing strategies for a firm or nonprofit organization.

MARK 468: Digital Marketing
Prerequisite: MARK 460
This course develops an understanding of the internet as part of an overall marketing strategy by considering the ways in which the internet has changed marketing and business. The course covers topics such as online consumer behavior, web analytics, online advertising, email, social media, mobile marketing, and search engine marketing (paid and organic). In addition to learning fundamental principles of digital channels, students will apply the learned principles in a class project such as creating a paid search campaign for a client, running a digital marketing simulation, writing a digital marketing plan, or conducting a social media audit.
Outcome: Students develop the power to act effectively by using technology in increasingly complex buying environments.

Ethics Requirement (1)

MGMT 441: Business Ethics, or MGMT 446: International Business Ethics
This course examines the ethical aspects of individual and corporate decision making in business and provides resources for making ethical decisions within the context of managerial practice.
Outcome: Students will be acquainted with the concepts and principles of ethical reasoning that have been developed in ethical theory; be aware of the specific ethical issues that arise in management and of the ways in which these issues are commonly analyzed; and be able to make sound ethical and managerial decisions and implement those decisions within the context of an organization in a competitive marketplace.

Track Requirements (2)

INFS 492: Database Systems*
This course uses database systems as the focus for studying concepts of data modeling and data manipulation. Procedures for creating, managing, sorting, and processing data are discussed. Concepts of relational database methods are covered as well as the issues that arise in managing information in a database and using it to support business processes.
Outcome: Understanding the development and use of business database systems.

MARK 562: Database Marketing Strategy
This course develops an understanding of the development and use of databases for marketing, retrieval of appropriate data and analysis of that data to increase marketing effectiveness.
Outcome: The student will perform database manipulation and analysis of data. Analysis includes at least univariate analysis, cross-tabulation, creation of new variables, regression analysis and recency-frequency-monetary analysis.

Track Electives (Choose 3)

MARK 661: Customer Analytics
In this course the students will study how to use data analytics to learn about customer needs and improve targeting individual consumers. The course will encourage students to apply scientific methods and models to predict and respond to customer choices. This is the key part of learning Big Data. The term Big Data is viewed in the broad sense as it relates to various aspects of the consumer behavior, which may be captured, measured, and transformed to the digital form.
Through applications of statistical models to the analysis of the real-world databases, the students will learn how firms may use customer data to serve customers better.

INFS 494: Data Mining*
Data Mining involves the search for patterns in large quantities of data. The fundamental techniques used in data mining include, but are not limited to, clustering, decision trees, neural networks, and association analysis.
Outcome: The student will be able to build models using an industry-standard package and interpret the results.

INFS 590: Strategy and Data (study abroad course)*
This course introduces the student to economic and business practices of a foreign country using the analysis of data, and on-site experiences. We will focus on business strategies, impediments, and challenges in light of the culture, politics, history and institutions of a selected country. We will interact with a variety of local people such as small business owners, firm managers, economists, journalists, and students, in order to inform our understanding and analysis.
Outcome: Students will gain knowledge and analytical skills that can assist them in facing the challenges of conducting business in global locations.

INFS 592: Data Visualization*
The amount of data that our world generates is growing at a torrid pace. Sifting through & making sense of these humongous mountains of data is crucial to ensuring business growth, success and to making scientific discoveries & advancements. Data visualization plays an important role in this process.
Outcome: Students will be able to process & visualize large amounts of data in order to enable efficient & effective analysis using industry standard software.

INFS 796: Data Warehousing*
The components and design issues related to data warehouses and business intelligence techniques for extracting meaningful information from data warehouses are emphasized. Oracle tools will be used to demonstrate design, implementation, and utilization issues.
Outcome: students will learn how data warehouses are used to help managers successfully gather, analyze, understand and act on information stored in data warehouses.

ISSCM 495: Forecasting*
Techniques of forecasting and model building are introduced. Methods covered are simple and multiple regression, introduction to time series components, exponential smoothing algorithms, and AIRMA models - Box Jenkins techniques. Business cases are demonstrated and solved using the computer.
Outcome: To be able forecast business and economic variables to enhance business decisions.

* Upon completion of INFS 492, 494, 796 and any other two starred (*) courses, the student will earn a Business Analytics Certificate.

Integrated Marketing Communications Track

The IMC track has a 12-course curriculum with 1 prerequisite course. The curriculum can be completed in 12-16 months.

Prerequisites (1)

ISSCM 402 Quantitative Methods II
In ISSCM 402 – Quantitative Methods II (Statistics Primer), the fundamentals of managerial statistics are presented. Topics include descriptive statistics, probability distributions, normal distribution, central limit theorem, estimation, hypothesis testing, and regression analysis.

The ISSCM 402 Quantitative Methods II course is required of all incoming MSM students and is offered every quarter.

Marketing Core (6)

MARK 460: Marketing Mangement
This course develops a broad understanding of the marketing principles that undergird successful marketing strategies and marketing plans with special attention given to international and ethical considerations.
Outcome: Students use and apply marketing principles, strategic research, consumer analysis and target marketing to either a project or to case studies.

MARK 461: Research Methods in Marketing
Prerequisites: MARK 460 and ISSCM 491
This course develops an understanding of the marketing research process and the role of survey research in this process.
Outcome: Students formulate research problems and a design research study, including the development of a questionnaire, selection of an appropriate sample, and data analysis.

MARK 464: Integrated Marketing Communications
Prerequisites: MARK 460; MARK 467 is recommended
This course develops an understanding of how advertising, sales promotion, public relations, personal selling and, in some cases, packaging decisions form a coordinated marketing communications plan.
Outcomes: Students apply the elements of integrated marketing communications and develop a coordinated marketing communications plan for a project or case study.

MARK 465: Global Marketing or Study Abroad
Prerequisite: MARK 460
This course develops an understanding of marketing problems in an international context, with particular attention given to the impact of international factors on consumers, competition, and marketing strategies.
Outcome: Students apply the principles of marketing to solve marketing problems in an international context. Students analyze cases and identify optimal solutions to international marketing problems.

MARK 467: Consumer Behavior and Insights
Prerequisite: MARK 460 (and recommended prior to MARK 464)
This course develops an understanding of consumer behavior before, during, and after the consumption process by exploring both the micro-level mental processes that have an impact on consumer decision-making, as well as macro-level cultural and social influences on consumer behavior.
Outcomes: Students apply course concepts and theories to develop a consumer analysis and marketing strategies for a firm or nonprofit organization.

MARK 468: Digital Marketing
Prerequisite: MARK 460
This course develops an understanding of the internet as part of an overall marketing strategy by considering the ways in which the internet has changed marketing and business. The course covers topics such as online consumer behavior, web analytics, online advertising, email, social media, mobile marketing, and search engine marketing (paid and organic). In addition to learning fundamental principles of digital channels, students will apply the learned principles in a class project such as creating a paid search campaign for a client, running a digital marketing simulation, writing a digital marketing plan, or conducting a social media audit.
Outcome: Students develop the power to act effectively by using technology in increasingly complex buying environments.

Ethics Requirement (1)

MGMT 441: Business Ethics, or MGMT 446: International Business Ethics
This course examines the ethical aspects of individual and corporate decision making in business and provides resources for making ethical decisions within the context of managerial practice.
Outcome: Students will be acquainted with the concepts and principles of ethical reasoning that have been developed in ethical theory; be aware of the specific ethical issues that arise in management and of the ways in which these issues are commonly analyzed; and be able to make sound ethical and managerial decisions and implement those decisions within the context of an organization in a competitive marketplace.

Track Electives (Choose 5)

MARK 463: Sales and Strategic Leadership
Prerequisite: MARK 460
This course develops an understanding of the tools and techniques required for developing a sales force and for managing revenue generation within organizations.
Outcome: Students apply processes for hiring and managing sales professionals; tools for successful account management; and skills in solving revenue generation problems facing profit and non-profit organizations.

MARK 475: Cross-cultural Dimensions of International Management & Marketing
Prerequisite: MARK 460
This course develops an understanding of cross-cultural management and marketing topics, both within the business organization and across the global marketplace.
Outcome: Students will be able to identify and describe how differences in national and ethnic cultures affect the behavior of employees working in organizations, managers making business decisions and consumers making product choices.

MARK 561: Comparative Consumer Behavior
Prerequisite: MARK 460
This course develops an understanding of the marketing implications of cultural differences and similarities between the people of two or more nations and considers two opposing views of marketing scholars as to whether the similarities or the differences are the more important factor.
Outcome: Students apply methods of cross-cultural analysis as well as examine frameworks for assessing multinational strategies.

MARK 562: Database Marketing Strategy
Prerequisite: MARK 460
This course develops an understanding of the development and use of databases for marketing, retrieval of appropriate data and analysis of that data to increase marketing effectiveness.
Outcome: The student will perform database manipulation and analysis of data. Analysis includes at least univariate analysis, cross-tabulation, creation of new variables, regression analysis and recency-frequency-monetary analysis.

MARK 564: Brand Equity and Marketing Strategy
Prerequisite: MARK 460
This course develops an understanding of the way firms may increase their share of market and profits by creating, building, and managing strong, unique, and favorable brand equity for their products and services.
Outcome: Students develop a Brand Plan, evaluating the contributions of traditional brand elements, and develop a framework for creating the marketing strategies required for successfully building and managing brand equity.

MARK 566: Multi-Media Planning
The course provides an overall understanding of media planning: basic media concepts, buying and selling of media, development and evaluating effective media strategies and plans, and the role that media plays in an integrated marketing and communications plan. The course is recommended for students with little or no media planning experience.

MARK 567: Customer Relationship Management
Prerequisites: MARK 460; MARK 468 is recommended.
This course develops an understanding of CRM as a business philosophy that involves acquiring new customers as well as maintaining long-term and profitable relationships with existing customers. Key concepts such as customer experience, customer satisfaction, loyalty, customer lifetime value, among others, will be explored.
Outcome: Students conduct an analysis and critique of a firm's CRM strategy and provide recommendations for improving the customer-firm/customer-brand relationship.

MARK 568: Social Media and Content Marketing
Prerequisite: Graduate School of Business student.

MARK 569: Special Topics
Prerequisite: MARK 460
Scheduled classes are offered on an ad hoc basis. Specific titles, prerequisites and content will vary.
Outcome: Students will be able to demonstrate understanding of specialized topics not otherwise covered by department regular course offerings.

MARK 661: Customer Analytics
Prerequisites: MARK 460, ISSCM 491, HRER 417, and MARK 461
Suggested Additional Prerequisites: INFS 492, INFS 791 and FINC 620
In this course the students will study how to use data analytics to learn about customer needs and improve targeting individual consumers. The course will encourage students to apply scientific methods and models to predict and respond to customer choices. This is the key part of learning Big Data. The term Big Data is viewed in the broad sense as it relates to various aspects of the consumer behavior, which may be captured, measured, and transformed to the digital form.
Outcomes: Through applications of statistical models to the analysis of the real-world databases, the students will learn how firms may use customer data to serve customers better.

MARK 662: Marketing Metrics
Prerequisites: MARK 460, ISSCM 491, HRER 417, and MARK 461
Suggested Additional Prerequisites: INFS 492, INFS 791 and FINC 620
This course is designed with marketing managers in mind. As profession marketing is evolving, it is no longer based primarily on the conceptual content. Marketers get exposed to thousand times the volume of data she(he) saw five years ago. More data cannot lead to better decision making unless managers learn how to use that data in meaningful ways. In this course, the students will be introduced to the analytical decision models that assist modern managers in making marketing decisions related to the targeting, product design, communications, etc.
Outcomes: The objectives of this course are the following: 1. To learn analytical techniques and decision models for enhancing marketing decision making in the modern organizations 2. Improve skills to viewing marketing processes and relationships systematically and analytically 3. To learn power of decision models applied in the real managerial contexts 4. To provide students with toolkit that may be used to assess and measure return on marketing investments in organizations.

MGMT 482: Entrepreneurial Marketing
Prerequisite: Graduate School of Business student
This course is about the marketing challenges in an entrepreneurial firm. Entrepreneurship is the discovery, enactment and pursuit of new business opportunities. Successful execution of an entrepreneurial idea requires a sound marketing plan. In this course, we will investigate how marketing tools can enable entrepreneurs to realize the full potential of their ideas.

Prerequisite course ISSCM 402 (Quantitative Methods II) may not be taken as an elective.
One elective may be taken from graduate business offering outside marketing for MS.

Pursuing Internet or Database Marketing

Students interested in careers in Internet or database marketing are encouraged to consider courses in e-commerce, data warehousing, or related areas from the extensive offerings in Loyola's highly respected masters’ degree program in information systems management.

Supply Chain Track

The Supply Chain track prepares you to effectively manage the execution component of marketing. The two areas of supply chain and marketing have long been intertwined, as an efficient supply chain allows for marketing strategy to be successfully implemented.

An expertise in supply chain will give you the skills to move products from materials supplier to end customer in a retail environment and manage operations in a service environment, learning the most advanced techniques in areas such as inventory management, purchasing management, global logistics, and supply chain analytics.

Possible careers paths include supply chain planner, marketing data analyst, and market risk and operations analyst.

Track Curriculum

The Supply Chain track has a 12-course curriculum with 1 prerequisite course. The curriculum can be completed in 12-16 months.

Prerequisites (1)

ISSCM 402 Quantitative Methods II
In ISSCM 402 – Quantitative Methods II (Statistics Primer), the fundamentals of managerial statistics are presented. Topics include descriptive statistics, probability distributions, normal distribution, central limit theorem, estimation, hypothesis testing, and regression analysis.

The ISSCM 402 Quantitative Methods II course is required of all incoming MSM students and is offered every quarter.

Marketing Core (6)

MARK 460: Marketing Mangement
This course develops a broad understanding of the marketing principles that undergird successful marketing strategies and marketing plans with special attention given to international and ethical considerations.
Outcome: Students use and apply marketing principles, strategic research, consumer analysis and target marketing to either a project or to case studies.

MARK 461: Research Methods in Marketing
Prerequisites: MARK 460 and ISSCM 491
This course develops an understanding of the marketing research process and the role of survey research in this process.
Outcome: Students formulate research problems and a design research study, including the development of a questionnaire, selection of an appropriate sample, and data analysis.

MARK 464: Integrated Marketing Communications
Prerequisites: MARK 460; MARK 467 is recommended
This course develops an understanding of how advertising, sales promotion, public relations, personal selling and, in some cases, packaging decisions form a coordinated marketing communications plan.
Outcomes: Students apply the elements of integrated marketing communications and develop a coordinated marketing communications plan for a project or case study.

MARK 465: Global Marketing or Study Abroad
Prerequisite: MARK 460
This course develops an understanding of marketing problems in an international context, with particular attention given to the impact of international factors on consumers, competition, and marketing strategies.
Outcome: Students apply the principles of marketing to solve marketing problems in an international context. Students analyze cases and identify optimal solutions to international marketing problems.

MARK 467: Consumer Behavior and Insights
Prerequisite: MARK 460 (and recommended prior to MARK 464)
This course develops an understanding of consumer behavior before, during, and after the consumption process by exploring both the micro-level mental processes that have an impact on consumer decision-making, as well as macro-level cultural and social influences on consumer behavior.
Outcomes: Students apply course concepts and theories to develop a consumer analysis and marketing strategies for a firm or nonprofit organization.

MARK 468: Digital Marketing
Prerequisite: MARK 460
This course develops an understanding of the internet as part of an overall marketing strategy by considering the ways in which the internet has changed marketing and business. The course covers topics such as online consumer behavior, web analytics, online advertising, email, social media, mobile marketing, and search engine marketing (paid and organic). In addition to learning fundamental principles of digital channels, students will apply the learned principles in a class project such as creating a paid search campaign for a client, running a digital marketing simulation, writing a digital marketing plan, or conducting a social media audit.
Outcome: Students develop the power to act effectively by using technology in increasingly complex buying environments.

Ethics Requirement (1)

MGMT 441: Business Ethics, or MGMT 446: International Business Ethics
This course examines the ethical aspects of individual and corporate decision making in business and provides resources for making ethical decisions within the context of managerial practice.
Outcome: Students will be acquainted with the concepts and principles of ethical reasoning that have been developed in ethical theory; be aware of the specific ethical issues that arise in management and of the ways in which these issues are commonly analyzed; and be able to make sound ethical and managerial decisions and implement those decisions within the context of an organization in a competitive marketplace.

Track Requirements (1)

SCMG 480: Intro to Operations Management*
Introduction to concepts and methods for managing operations in manufacturing and service organizations. Topics typically include forecasting, capacity and aggregate planning, material requirements planning, scheduling, facility layout and location, inventory management, just-in-time, total quality management, project planning, and logistics.
Outcome: Students will understand the basic issues and role of operations management in organizations and learn tools for problem-solving in operations management.

Track Electives (Choose 4)

ISSCM 484: Project Management
The art and science of project management as applied to a variety of business and technical projects in commercial, public, and private sectors. Covers: project life cycle and methodology; teambuilding; project organization, stakeholders and leadership; proposals and contracts; techniques for project planning, estimating, scheduling, and control; PMO.
Outcome: Understanding of the broader role of the project manager with regard to all project stakeholders, and of methods, tools, and procedures for initiating, defining, and executing projects.

ISSCM 495: Forecasting Methods
Techniques of forecasting and model building are introduced. Methods covered are simple and multiple regression, introduction to time series components, exponential smoothing algorithms, and AIRMA models - Box Jenkins techniques. Business cases are demonstrated and solved using the computer.
Outcome: To be able forecast business and economic variables to enhance business decisions.

SCMG 481: Performance Improvement in Business Processes
Focuses on process view of the organization and provides students with a formal approach to designing, monitoring and improving business processes. The course provides the tools, methods and practical examples to help managers learn how to think from a process standpoint and how to ensure critical processes are controlled and functioning efficiently and effectively in their organization.
Outcome: Understanding of the quality management concepts, performance improvement frameworks (Six Sigma, ISO, Baldridge), and process improvement practices using a step-by-step problem solving methodology.

SCMG 482: Lean Production Concepts and Practices
Methods for managing manufacturing and service operations based upon Toyota Production System. Topics include the principles of JIT and lean production, pull production, setup reduction, preventive maintenance, cellular manufacturing, standard operations, visual management, employee empowerment, and supplier partnerships.
Outcome: Understanding of concepts and tools for reducing waste and continuously improving operations based upon Toyota's success-proven approach.

SCMG 483: Management of Service Operations
This course explores the application of operations management concepts and techniques in service-sector organizations, and, in particular, how services are delivered to the customer.
Outcome: Understanding how service management requires unique tools for managing customer expectations while simultaneously delivering services that exceed those expectations.

SCMG 486: Global Logistics*
This course examines how business partners along the supply chain can work together to gain competitive advantage in moving products and services around the world to satisfy customers.
Outcome: Understanding best practices like vendor-managed inventory and category management, and the application of information technologies for sharing information.

SCMG 487: Purchasing Management*
A study of organizational procurement processes and decision making framework. Topics include in-sourcing/out-sourcing decisions based on total cost of ownership; purchasing cycle and processes; developing material and technical specifications; supplier evaluation, selection and management; supplier quality management; purchasing capital goods and services; global sourcing and e-commerce; and purchasing tools and analytics.
Outcomes: Students will have developed an understanding of fundamental and strategic issues in material planning and procurement, with the ability to source in a global marketplace.

SCMG 488: Inventory Management*
A study of the fundamental principles of effective management of inventory with emphasis on inventory costs, product stratification, performance measures, demand forecasting, periodic and continuous review, safety stock, material requirements planning, customer service and use of technology in inventory management. Issues related to storage and handling of inventory stock are also studied.
Outcomes: Students will have developed an understanding of the issues involved in planning, managing and control of inventories and materials in a supply chain.

SCMG 489: Supply Chain Analytics
A study of the design, development, and use of decision models for analysis of supply chain problems. This course provides an example-driven approach to learn about important supply chain models, problems, and solution methodologies. The objectives of this course are to develop valuable modeling skills that students can appreciate and use effectively.
Outcomes: Students will have developed an understanding of the issues involved in the use of decision support tools for analysis of supply chain problems.

*Upon completion of the starred courses (*) and one additional supply chain track elective, the student will earn a Supply Chain Fundamentals Certificate.

Admission

Whatever your academic and professional background, we understand the importance of the decision that you are about to make, and our goal is to make your application and admission process a seamless one.

Application Deadlines

All graduate programs in the Quinlan School of Business are on the quarter system. For the Next Generation MBA, flexible and one-year students can start in fall or spring. Students on the flexible, two-year track can begin in any quarter.

QUARTERAPPLICATION DEADLINEQUARTER START
Fall July 15 Late August
Winter October 1 Early November
Spring January 15 Late February
Summer April 1 Late May
      1. Application Form

        Use our free online application system to get started.
        When applying, choose the year and "Business".
        Please note, you will need to complete the “Biographical Information” section of the application first. Once that section is completed, you will be able to choose your program in the “Application Information” section.

      2. Official Transcripts

        Applicants must submit official transcripts for all undergraduate and any graduate work. To be eligible for admission, your transcript must show an earned bachelor's degree or a bachelor's degree in progress. Certified copies of transcripts are acceptable; faxed copies of transcripts are not considered official. If you attended Loyola University Chicago previously, you do not need to request transcripts; we have them on record.

      3. Professional Resume

        A professional resume may be uploaded via the online application form or you may email it to us at gradapp@luc.edu.

      4. Letter of Recommendation

        Letters of recommendation are optional. No more than one letter should be submitted.
        For applicants who may feel that one or more parts of their application are weak, letters of recommendation are strongly encouraged. If you wish to submit a letter, include your recommender's email address as part as your online application form and we will send them a personalized link to upload the letter.

      5. Statement of Purpose

        The Statement of Purpose is optional.
        For applicants who believe one or more parts of their application is weak, a personal statement is highly recommended. The statement should provide context for area(s) of weakness, accomplishments to date, and how Loyola's Quinlan School of Business graduate degree program will prepare you to achieve your career goals. Limit personal essay to 2-3 pages, double-space.

      6. Test Scores (GMAT or GRE)

        Due to the unprecedented circumstances of the COVID-19 outbreak, we are waiving the GMAT/GRE requirement for 2020 and 2021 applicants.

Non Degree Seeking Option

The non-degree-seeking option is for students who wish to sample classes before applying to a degree program, transfer credit to another institution, or obtain professional or personal enrichment.

Non-degree-seeking students may apply a maximum of 9 semester hours (3 courses) toward a degree at Quinlan.

Admission as a non-degree-seeking student does not guarantee admission to a formal program. Should you decide to pursue a degree program, a new application and all supporting materials are required.

For International Applicants

Language Test Requirements

An official TOEFL, IELTS or PTE score report is required for international applicants whose native language is not English. Copies and faxes are not accepted as official documents; we must receive test scores directly from the testing service. The minimum acceptable total score on the Internet-Based Test (IBT) of the TOEFL exam is 90. The minimum acceptable total score on the IELTS exam is 6.5. The minimum acceptable score on the PTE exam is 61.

This requirement is waived for those who have completed a four-year U.S. bachelor's degree program or those who are citizens of or have completed a bachelor's degree at a recognized institution at which the language of instruction is English in these countries: Canada, the United Kingdom, Ireland, Australia, or New Zealand.

Transcript Eval

If you have non-U.S. educational credentials, you are required to submit your official education credentials (e.g., transcripts, mark sheets, degree certificates, graduation diplomas) and evaluation fee directly to any NACES member companies including:

Please request a course-by-course evaluation report and have the official report sent to:

Graduate & Professional Enrollment Management
Loyola University Chicago
820 N. Michigan Ave., Suite 1200
Chicago, IL 60611

Please direct any questions about required credentials to the evaluation company you have selected and not to Loyola University Chicago.

Tuition and Financial Aid

The Quinlan School of Business and Loyola's Financial Aid Office are committed to helping students secure the necessary financial resources to make their graduate business education at Loyola affordable.