Loyola University Chicago

Safety Net Coalition

Alcohol- JFRC and Loyola Vietnam Center policies

These policies apply to students studying abroad at a Loyola campus

The John Felice Rome Center (JFRC) and Loyola Vietnam Center are Loyola campuses and students are held accountable to the LUC community standards. However, as these campuses are located in countries with different alcohol and drug laws, students studying abroad adhere to different community standards when it regards alcohol use. Please see below for more information on each campus' policies.

John Felice Rome Center (JFRC) Alcohol Policy

Italian law permits consumption of alcohol for those over age sixteen, students who study at the JFRC are able to consume alcohol. Students who choose to consume alcohol are expected to do so responsibly and with maturity, whether on or off-campus. If a student demonstrates a lack of control while under the influence of alcohol, JFRC staff reserves the right to address the student’s behavior in the interest of protecting the student from harm to self or others at any time on or off-campus.

Alcohol is permitted on-campus in the residence hall, but restricted to responsible private consumption in one’s room, including the Zone Hotel rooms. Students residing at the Zone Hotel should consider the hotel terrace a public space where consuming alcohol is not permitted, unless purchased at the hotel restaurant.

Designated areas on campus have been established for the purposes of special events where alcoholic beverages may be served. Permission must be secured from the Dean for JFRC Student Life before an event that involves alcohol can occur, and specific regulations must be followed. Admission to social events is restricted to the JFRC community and those guests approved by the Dean of JFRC Student Life.

The sale of alcoholic beverages by anyone anywhere on the JFRC campus is strictly prohibited. Non-alcoholic beverages and food must be available at all events where alcohol is served and should be featured at least as prominently as alcoholic beverages. The time during which alcohol may be served at an event may be limited at the discretion of the Dean of JFRC Student Life.

Any JFRC student who engages in any form of alcohol consumption will hold harmless the JFRC, Loyola University Chicago, and its Board of Trustees from any and all claims and causes of action for

damage to or loss of property, personal illness or injury, or death arising out of activity conducted while alcohol was present.

The following conduct is expressly prohibited at the JFRC regardless of age:

a. Possessing or transporting alcohol in an open or unsealed container in public view, including calico games (A) (*an unsealed container is any container that has previously been opened).

b. Hosting or attending an unapproved party or gathering at which alcohol is present (A)

c. Public intoxication on University property or at University-sponsored events (B)

d. Manufacture or sale of alcohol on campus (B)

e. Disruptive activity due to intoxication (B)

f. Severe intoxication that requires assistance returning to or navigating the JFRC campus or that requires hospitalization (C)

Common sanctions for a first-time offense include: (for Category A) €25-50 fine, 5-10 restorative service hours, educational experience or project; (for Category B) €50-100 fine, 10-20 restorative service hours, more intensive educational experience or project; (for Category C) €200-400 fine, 20-30 restorative service hours, extensive educational experience or project, and/or JFRC dismissal.

*For JFRC students under 21 years of age, parents or guardians may be notified of any violation of this policy.

Loyola Vietnam Center Alcohol Policy

Vietnamese law permits purchase of alcohol by those eighteen years or older; there is no minimum drinking age under Vietnamese law. Therefore, most students studying at LVC are able to buy and consume alcohol legally. Students who choose to consume alcohol are expected to do so responsibly. Alcohol consumption is not permitted at the university dormitory or at the university campus. These are Bach Khoa University rules. Students are subject to the disciplinary actions of dormitory administration and the university itself if they are found to be consuming alcohol on site at the dorm, or on campus at a non-university sponsored event.

LVC staff may determine, by any means at their disposal, whether a student is engaging in excessive drinking and may take reasonable steps to ensure that the student does not cause harm to self or others while studying at the LVC program.

Any LVC student who engages in any form of alcohol consumption will hold harmless the LVC, Loyola University Chicago, and its Board of Trustees from any and all claims and causes of action for damage to or loss of property, personal illness or injury, or death arising out of activity conducted while alcohol was present.

The following conduct is expressly prohibited at the LVC regardless of age:

a. Disruptive activity due to intoxication (B)

b. Severe intoxication that requires assistance returning to or navigating the dormitory or campus, or that requires hospitalization (C)

Common sanctions include: (for Category B) $150 fine, 10-20 restorative service hours, educational experience or project; (for Category C) $400 fine, 20-30 restorative service hours, extensive educational experience or project, and/or LVC dismissal.

*For LVC students under 21 years of age, parents or guardians may be notified of any violation of this policy.

Drug Policy

Possession, use, transfer, distribution, manufacture or sale of drugs, controlled substances, narcotics or hallucinogens without a valid medical prescription or appropriate authority is prohibited at the LVC program. Students must keep a prescription for any legitimate psychotherapeutic medications and an explanatory note from their treating doctor. Students may not possess any form of drug paraphernalia.

Vietnamese law prohibits the possession, sale, or use of marijuana, narcotics, and hallucinogens, except under medical supervision. It must be clearly understood that in Vietnam the mere possession of marijuana constitutes a felony. Students should inform themselves about and understand the severity of Vietnamese laws regulating drugs and the conditions in Vietnamese prisons and govern their actions accordingly.

The U.S. Embassy and Consulates can do very little for U.S. citizens arrested on drug charges. Consular officers can typically visit detainees three or four days after their arrest to inform them of their rights, provide a list of lawyers, contact family or friends for assistance, and attempt to ensure that U.S. citizens receive the same treatment that a Vietnamese citizen would receive. Consular officers cannot act as lawyers or give legal advice, and U.S. government funds cannot be used to pay legal fees or other expenses of arrested U.S. citizens.

For the reasons stated above, all drug-related policies of Loyola University Chicago also apply at the LVC, but violations by LVC students are Category C violations and therefore may result in LVC dismissal.

*For LVC students under 21 years of age, parents or guardians may be notified of any violation of this policy.